Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Burnt out external hard drive

Last response: in Storage
Share
March 24, 2010 10:59:31 PM

I was on the phone with my internet provider's tech support person who was trying to get my internet up and running. The first tech had me power my computer on and off for 6-7 times during a one hour time frame. Then one hour later another tech support had me do the same thing and I started to hear a buzzing noise come from my external hard drive. I have since found out that the heads crashed and I have lost all my data. Was the powering on and off of the computer what caused this to happen or was it a coincidence?
March 24, 2010 11:20:28 PM

could of been either but in a case like this should have disconnected a device such as that when your powering a computer off and on like that. its like how you can damage an internal hard drive by shutting down your computer by using the switch on your PSU all the time
m
0
l
a b G Storage
March 25, 2010 12:21:05 AM

If you turned off the computer by pulling the plug then you can damage the hard drive, however if you shut down properly by using the shutdown icon then it was either coincidence or you had a bad hard drive that could have failed at any time.
m
0
l
Related resources
a c 415 G Storage
March 25, 2010 1:16:39 AM

Older hard drives had heads which physically contacted the disk surface when they were spun down - they were typically rated for about 50,000 start/stop cycles. That equates to about 13 years if you did 10 power cycles a day. Another 6 or 7 power cycles wouldn't make any significant difference.

More modern drives have loading ramps and the head is retracted beyond the edge of the disk surface when the drive spins down. Those drives typically don't have a start/stop rating, only a MTBF (mean time between failure).
m
0
l
March 25, 2010 11:46:06 AM

sminlal said:
Older hard drives had heads which physically contacted the disk surface when they were spun down - they were typically rated for about 50,000 start/stop cycles. That equates to about 13 years if you did 10 power cycles a day. Another 6 or 7 power cycles wouldn't make any significant difference.

More modern drives have loading ramps and the head is retracted beyond the edge of the disk surface when the drive spins down. Those drives typically don't have a start/stop rating, only a MTBF (mean time between failure).


So you feel it is purely a coincidence?
m
0
l
March 25, 2010 11:46:40 AM

So was it a coincidence or did it cause the crash?
m
0
l
a c 415 G Storage
March 25, 2010 9:52:47 PM

Well if the drive was marginal then a lot of power cycling could have contributed to it's demise. But if it was that marginal then it probably wouldn't have lasted much longer anyway.

So basically, yeah - I think it's pretty much coincidence.
m
0
l
April 1, 2010 12:12:02 AM

Okay, thanks for you insight.
m
0
l
!