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Overclocking a E5200

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February 11, 2010 10:11:12 PM

I'm having some trouble to overclocking a E5200 as I am new to this type of thing. I want to overclock a E5200 on a GA-31MX-S2 with 2 GB of 667 MHz Ram. Could anybody show me the right settings so I can keep my ram at 667 MHz?

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a c 197 K Overclocking
February 13, 2010 4:49:29 PM

You do not want to keep your RAM at DDR2-667.

This should be your first stop.
HOWTO: Overclock C2Q (Quads) and C2D (Duals) - Guide v1.6.1
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/240001-29-howto-overc...

Shadow's Gigabyte motherboard OC guide:
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/page-245679_11_0.ht...
It's for an EP35-DS3L but all the Gigabyte Core2 BIOS's are similar.

For a serious overclock, you will need better than stock cooling. Here are three under $50 heatsinks that are pretty popular:
Sunbeam
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Xigmatec Dark Knight
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I've added this one, because it is starting to get really popular:
COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 Plus
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

They all require a somewhat different approach to applying thermal compound.
Suggestions for applying thermal compound:
http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...

And they are pretty large, so they might not fit inside your case.

Go through the guides. Then go into the BIOS and change the System Memory Multiplier (or whatever your BIOS calls it) from AUTO to 2.00, 2.00B, or 2.00D - whichever you need to set the Memory Frequency to twice the FSB. Then when you increase the FSB, the memory clock will rise in step with it. If your FSB is at 300 MHz, your memory clock should be at 600 MHz.

Download CPU-Z to check your FSB:RAM ratio.

Warning - confusion factor between what the BIOS calls things and what CPUZ calls things. What the BIOS calls "memory frequency" is actually the memory clock. What CPUZ calls "memory frequency" is half the memory clock - DDR2 RAM, remember? It transfers two chunks of data each bus cycle. What you want in CPUZ is a 1:1 FSB:RAM ratio.

Overclocking memory doesn't accomplish much besides limiting your CPU overclock where the real speed comes from.

Don't go over 1.3625 volts on your vcore and do not exceed load temps of 70 C.
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