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Cant get mobo to run ata100

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  • DFI
  • Startup Screen
  • Motherboards
Last response: in Motherboards
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February 19, 2009 1:13:26 AM

I hava a dfi ca64ec with a p3 800eb and 512m - xp pro -sp3 I have a maxtor 6eo4olo 40gig ata133 hard disk. the mobo specs say it supports ata100. the startup screen says the ide speed is ata66 I have changed the 80 pin cable and no difference. I have upgraded the bios to latest no diff.. I have taken the drive to another pc which runs ata100 and that startup screen reports ata100 , I have taken a drive from a p4 machine which is running at ata100 and fitted it to my problem machine and it reports ata66 . all settings on the dfi board are auto.
can anyone shed a bit of light here thanks..

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February 19, 2009 8:45:00 AM

It's not unusual for MB spec lists to have errors. Perhaps your MB has the VT82C686A south bridge, which only supports ATA66, instead of the VT82C686B south bridge? In any case, I wouldn't expect your hard drive to be able to saturate the bandwidth of even ATA66, so you shouldn't see any practical difference.
a b V Motherboard
February 19, 2009 10:42:30 AM

Agree here, you have spent a lot of time and trouble for nothing.
I would expect your disk to have around 10-20mbs of sustained throughput, with bursts maybe as high as 35-40. In other words yeah, like Mondoman said, the ATA66 interface is already faster than your drive will ever be able to use.
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February 19, 2009 2:50:05 PM

Mondoman said:
It's not unusual for MB spec lists to have errors. Perhaps your MB has the VT82C686A south bridge, which only supports ATA66, instead of the VT82C686B south bridge? In any case, I wouldn't expect your hard drive to be able to saturate the bandwidth of even ATA66, so you shouldn't see any practical difference.



Thanks for the prompt reply. Perhaps the MB does have VT82C686A south bridge . The manual says VIA® 82C694X/82C686B AGPset . I will have a look at the chip numbers and see if I can ID it. Yes I have wasted a lot of time on this irrelevant problem but it would be great to solve it. As I am no expert I will ask you to explain
what you mean by "able to saturate the bandwidth of ATA66 " . I thaught that a HD which supports ATA133 or less connected to an interface which supports ATA100
would normally transfer data at this speed if the demand was there. I also don't understand what is meant by the "ATA66 interface is already faster than your drive will ever be able to use" which is quoted from jitpublishers reply to my post. The drive specs say it supports all data transfer rates up to UDMA6. Now I know this gear is old and way outdated but I would like to understand why an interface is capable of ATA100 but not able to operate at anywhere near this speed. Also the saying "if it's not broke don't fix it" is relevant here. The machine is used on my network to run a couple of printers which it does with ease and is very reliable. It just bugs me to think that I have perhaps done something wrong when I built/configured the machine.. once again thanks for your reply :pt1cable: 
February 19, 2009 3:00:11 PM

jitpublisher said:
Agree here, you have spent a lot of time and trouble for nothing.
I would expect your disk to have around 10-20mbs of sustained throughput, with bursts maybe as high as 35-40. In other words yeah, like Mondoman said, the ATA66 interface is already faster than your drive will ever be able to use.


Thanks for the prompt reply, I have replied to Mondoman and asked him a couple of questions. As you can see what I asked him I will not repaeat myself and
would appreciate your input to my irrelevant problem . I understand that I have spent a lot of time and although the HD transfer rate hasn;t changed. I have sure learned a lot. ;) 
a b V Motherboard
February 22, 2009 1:12:35 PM

Hi again, sorry for late posting...
The interface speed that the drive controller is able work at has progressed much faster over the years than harddrive speed has. What we meant was even though you may be able to get the drive to work at a faster interface speed, the drive its self simply cannot move data that fast.
Notice that the standard today it pretty much SATA 2, or 300. The interface is capable of 300mb/s speed, but if you test a drive plugged in, the fastest of them will only approach speeds of 150mb/s. A few will do more, most will do considerable less. So even though the drives are on a much faster interface, that does not mean the drive can actually work that fast.
The old IDE drives....it is was generally considered that the ATA 66 interface was fast enough for all but the most expensive, very fastest drives you could buy at the time, like the Raptors. If you had an old Raptor, then going to the ATA100 interface would have some benefit....small but you would get a little as these drives were able to approach ATA100 speeds. But there were very few other drives of the day that could do it.
February 23, 2009 1:19:56 AM

Hi Jitpublisher,
Thanks for the explaination. Given this info could I assume that if I had a HD and wanted to measure its transfer speed , I could connect it to an interface which at least supports its stated TXF speed and run a program like performance test which I think tests disk transfer in MB/sec . And that result would be a fairly close indication of its capabilities...
!