Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Upgrading Motherboard on Compaq Presario SR5350F case

Last response: in Motherboards
Share
February 21, 2009 5:11:10 PM

Hi guys, new member here after much lurking. I am afflicted by a certain problem which I wish to resolve and hoping someone here can give me some insight into it. Just got a Compaq Presario SR5350F which is basically a POS computer. The only thing good about it is that it has an E2160 processor and 2GB of RAM. I've bought a new Thermaltake 430W power supply with a 4670 Sapphire video card to push graphics.

Would like to be able to edit HD videos etc. The factory motherboard is horrible. Cannot put anymore than 2GB of RAM. So I am thinking of upgrading to a better motherboard.

My question is this,

Can this be done? or has someone done it?

Will the new motherboard come with its own I/O back panel? Will I need to cut out the panel on the Compaq Case?

All I need to do is take out the Mobo, put in a new one with 4GB of RAM minimum, and a Core 2 Duo processor. Need serious advice. I do like the case and would like to keep this case.

Model: Compaq Presario SR5350F

Factory Mobo: Asus IPILP-LC, http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01...

Mid Tower Compaq Case

MicroATX Motherboard.

I have looked all over the net and have not found any help so far so I am hoping this great community can help with some info.

Thank you and have a wonderful day!

a c 435 V Motherboard
February 22, 2009 11:03:14 AM

I upgraded my compaq presario recently with an ecs g33 motherboard with 4 memory slots. It was closeout at fry's for $19.99. The g33 boards are micro-atx, and cost about $65-80 new at places like newegg. New boards come with their own backplate. The old presario backplate is easily removed. Only problem is the motherboard cpu backplate is taped on to the underside of the board. You have to carefully remove it by gently pressing a flathead screwdriver around the plate until the backing is loose enough to remove the plate without damaging the board circuitry. My avc heatsink was the screw-on variety, which required the special backplate to reuse the heatsink. Or, you can order an Intel heatsink for $15-20 that doesn't need the plate, but has it's own special problem of pressing on firmly to seat all 4 corners to make proper contact with the cpu. Either way it's not too difficult; just reserve some time to do it without rushing. Save the old compaq motherboard; they go for a good price used on ebay. For windows, I used a dell oem vista dvd and had to format the hardrive first. Your old compaq widows version only works with hp motherboards ( I made my own backup dvd's which didn't work on the ecs board). After installing vista with the dell dvd, I used the compaq microsoft coa sticker number on the side of the case to reactivate windows. I did not need any of the other hp software; most of which was only a free trial version. The dell oem cd's or dvd's are available at software venders like 9software or others listed on pricewatch under "operating system". They cost about $16 shipped. My ecs g33 board won't overclock the cpu, but I don't need to. It has onboard video, but I don't recall if it has memory voltage adjustments in the bios. All the compaq case connections worked on the ecs board, even the power led and hardrive led work. You have to decide if it's worth the effort. If you've never installed a motherboard before and your system is still under warranty, I don't recommend it. I have been building systems for 16 years, and don't need the warranty. I have changed to a better power supply, faster dual core e4500 cpu, and the ecs board. Now I have some spare parts. But you could end up with a system that doesn't work and no warranty if you can't fix it yourself. So, think about it before ordering. Also, I noticed that your board has an ide port, which my g33 board doesn't. So, you would need an ide board if your optical or hardrives were ide. Check the new board specs carefully for an ide port. My ecs board doesn't have it; all my stuff is sata. You can download the motherboard manual off the manufacturer's website and check it out before ordering, including the bios adjustments. It only takes a few minutes.
February 22, 2009 2:18:15 PM

Dear o1die,

If my memory serves me right, I may have stumbled upon one of your posts somewhere while I was lurking. I just can't recall where! Maybe you are also on another forum. Anyways, I could be imagining things. Here's a long and detailed response to yours. Please take your time.

Certainly appreciate such a long and detailed response. Thank you very much!

I live in Montreal, Canada, so I am not sure whawt "fry's" is...I'm presuming its an electronics hardware store. I do not need IDE in this computer. I have all my IDE drives in my other PCs. I believe the hybrids are no longer needed thanks to networking.

I would like to stick purely to a SATA/+eSATA board that can handle upto 8GB+ of RAM, preferrably 2 PCIeX16 slots but not absolutely necessary since my Thermaltake 430W is not actually a 430W PSU and puts out just enough voltage for 1 video card, and 2+ PCI/PCIex1 slots for sound/extra device, though a good quality onboard sound controller would suffice, and MicroATX sizing ofcourse.

Except for the last 12 years or so, and not having kept up with hardware trends and prices, I do have quite a bit of experience with PCs, and my experience taking the SR5350F apart last night were a little different than yours. Granted I didnt spend much more than 10 minutes on it. I took the motherboard apart, I believe there are 6 screws holding it to the side of the case. I can see now how limited this case is, as one side cannot/Will not come off. I did not experience the motherboard to be taped down to its aluminum base. It came off easily.

The only problem I can foresee is where the I/O connections of the motherboard are. The Panel with the little slots for where all the Motherboard's I/O connections go seems to be solidly put into place. That will need to be taken out. I only spent about 10 minutes with it so that is something I will need to look into, however any of your input on how to remove this nasty I/O plate so I can use the one that comes with the motherboard will be of great help.

My goal is this:

1) Get a motherboard that can overclock this CPU and meet the above mentioned requirements.

2) Get atleast 4GB of RAM for this motherboard.

3) Find the best possible price/performance ratio.

This is where I would need your advice. With so many names, so many prices around, one can start pulling out hair. Would like to discuss the eBay fact you threw out there as well after my initial issue gets resolved. This computer will be used for work/partially some entertainment as well.

Thanks again for your reply, and hope to get in touch with you about this soon.
Related resources
February 22, 2009 2:19:19 PM

Sorry I am having a bit of trouble posting. I hope my last message went through. Please confirm, and thank you for your last message o1die.

o1die said:
I upgraded my compaq presario recently with an ecs g33 motherboard with 4 memory slots. It was closeout at fry's for $19.99. The g33 boards are micro-atx, and cost about $65-80 new at places like newegg. New boards come with their own backplate. The old presario backplate is easily removed. Only problem is the motherboard cpu backplate is taped on to the underside of the board. You have to carefully remove it by gently pressing a flathead screwdriver around the plate until the backing is loose enough to remove the plate without damaging the board circuitry. My avc heatsink was the screw-on variety, which required the special backplate to reuse the heatsink. Or, you can order an Intel heatsink for $15-20 that doesn't need the plate, but has it's own special problem of pressing on firmly to seat all 4 corners to make proper contact with the cpu. Either way it's not too difficult; just reserve some time to do it without rushing. Save the old compaq motherboard; they go for a good price used on ebay. For windows, I used a dell oem vista dvd and had to format the hardrive first. Your old compaq widows version only works with hp motherboards ( I made my own backup dvd's which didn't work on the ecs board). After installing vista with the dell dvd, I used the compaq microsoft coa sticker number on the side of the case to reactivate windows. I did not need any of the other hp software; most of which was only a free trial version. The dell oem cd's or dvd's are available at software venders like 9software or others listed on pricewatch under "operating system". They cost about $16 shipped. My ecs g33 board won't overclock the cpu, but I don't need to. It has onboard video, but I don't recall if it has memory voltage adjustments in the bios. All the compaq case connections worked on the ecs board, even the power led and hardrive led work. You have to decide if it's worth the effort. If you've never installed a motherboard before and your system is still under warranty, I don't recommend it. I have been building systems for 16 years, and don't need the warranty. I have changed to a better power supply, faster dual core e4500 cpu, and the ecs board. Now I have some spare parts. But you could end up with a system that doesn't work and no warranty if you can't fix it yourself. So, think about it before ordering. Also, I noticed that your board has an ide port, which my g33 board doesn't. So, you would need an ide board if your optical or hardrives were ide. Check the new board specs carefully for an ide port. My ecs board doesn't have it; all my stuff is sata. You can download the motherboard manual off the manufacturer's website and check it out before ordering, including the bios adjustments. It only takes a few minutes.

February 22, 2009 2:30:57 PM

Just a side note, overclocking is not necessary. It is just something I have been wanting to fiddle with. But again, just like you, I may go with a higher rate processor than fiddle with overclocking because a lot of other variables ie. heat, power, and other risks come into play. So again, I am thinking that you might say something about this, so I'm just putting it out there that its not required. Just something I wanted to play with. A good solid motherboard that will work with the e2160 processor, and later allow me to add another one (6-8 months down the line) would be perfect along with 4GB of RAM.

I will need a copy of Windows Vista for sure. I do have the original OEM Activation Serial number on the side of my case so I can definitely use my own.
a c 435 V Motherboard
February 22, 2009 3:59:38 PM

Have a look at some g41 and g43 boards at newegg. Select these by chipset category and "lowest price". Then read some reviews and decide on a board model number. You don't have to buy from the egg, but their customer reviews are as good as any. Decide if you want a dual video port connection, or hdmi support for 1080p playback with the right blueray setup. Then go shopping in canada if desired.
February 22, 2009 5:01:21 PM

Will look at the motherboards today. Will probably keep the e2160 until core2quad drops in price. Is eBay the only place to let the old motherboard go? What would I expect to fetch for this board?

Had a look at the back I/O panel again today and in better light. It looks like it is firmly in place. Any ideas on the safest way to take it out without damaging the case? This would be my first attempt at this and though I can improvise, I think it is always best to ask someone who knows before hand. How did you take the back panel out?

Have a wonderful Sunday.

Cheers mate.


o1die said:
Have a look at some g41 and g43 boards at newegg. Select these by chipset category and "lowest price". Then read some reviews and decide on a board model number. You don't have to buy from the egg, but their customer reviews are as good as any. Decide if you want a dual video port connection, or hdmi support for 1080p playback with the right blueray setup. Then go shopping in canada if desired.

!