Difference in Sharp LCD TVs

Archived from groups: alt.video.digital-tv (More info?)

I noticed that Sharp offers several different widescreen LCD models with the
same picture size, for example, at the 26" level, there's the LC-26GA5U, and
then, for about $500 more, they offer the LC-26D5U. For the extra 500 beans
you get a built-in HDTV tuner with a CableCARD slot. Now, could someone
explain to me why anyone would buy the more expensive model with a built-in
HD tuner when seemingly all U.S. cable companies that offer HDTV do so with
a free external cable box that has the HDTV tuner built into it? Is there
something that I'm missing here, like would it be an advantage for satellite
customers? Also, would the built-in HD tuner work right out of the box with
many U.S. cable providers? Help me satisfy my curiosity here. THanks.
6 answers Last reply
More about difference sharp
  1. Archived from groups: alt.video.digital-tv (More info?)

    John wrote:
    > I noticed that Sharp offers several different widescreen LCD models with the
    > same picture size, for example, at the 26" level, there's the LC-26GA5U, and
    > then, for about $500 more, they offer the LC-26D5U. For the extra 500 beans
    > you get a built-in HDTV tuner with a CableCARD slot. Now, could someone
    > explain to me why anyone would buy the more expensive model with a built-in
    > HD tuner when seemingly all U.S. cable companies that offer HDTV do so with
    > a free external cable box that has the HDTV tuner built into it?

    For $500, it's not clear. At the reasonable price of say $100 more,
    it's clear: many people are not interested in cable. At $100 more
    you get the convenient built in tuner, so you can watch HDTV
    for free.

    A plain over the air HD tuner should add no more than $75 to
    the price.

    Doug McDonald
  2. Archived from groups: alt.video.digital-tv (More info?)

    Doug McDonald wrote:
    > John wrote:
    >
    >> I noticed that Sharp offers several different widescreen LCD models
    >> with the same picture size, for example, at the 26" level, there's the
    >> LC-26GA5U, and then, for about $500 more, they offer the LC-26D5U.
    >> For the extra 500 beans you get a built-in HDTV tuner with a CableCARD
    >> slot. Now, could someone explain to me why anyone would buy the more
    >> expensive model with a built-in HD tuner when seemingly all U.S. cable
    >> companies that offer HDTV do so with a free external cable box that
    >> has the HDTV tuner built into it?
    >
    >
    > For $500, it's not clear. At the reasonable price of say $100 more,
    > it's clear: many people are not interested in cable. At $100 more
    > you get the convenient built in tuner, so you can watch HDTV
    > for free.
    >
    > A plain over the air HD tuner should add no more than $75 to
    > the price.
    >
    > Doug McDonald

    It may be possible theoretically to offer an integrated set for $75. But
    most manufacturers who are STILL in business have learned to factor in
    all the cost associated with each thing they sell.

    When they include the 8-VSB receiver in the HDTV set they incur the the
    added cost of RETURNS when a percentage of buyers actually try to use
    these integrated receivers and attach an antenna. Horrors! The added
    cost of returning sets makes retailers steer CORRECTLY most customers
    who will be attaching their sets to cable to those with NO receiver, a
    monitor. This eliminates the WASTED cost of the OTA receiver while
    allowing the retailer to compete with the competition that is doing
    likewise.

    The higher cost than Doug thinks is "necessary" is also a way to make
    sure that few buy integrated sets with their increased HIDDEN cost of
    returns. A return of a large HDTV set is more costly than the return of
    STB's that weigh a lot less for one thing. Also the hit a retailer takes
    in open box specials on integrated HD sets is greater than on an STB
    based just on the higher total cost.

    If I were a retailer with current 8-VSB receiver tech I would jack the
    price as high as it takes to discourage any sales. With the exception of
    the latest LG integrated sets with 5th gen chips if indeed they have the
    same tech that we tested last summer. We will hopefully test one next
    week to see if it is so.

    I am worried because two receivers we tested with 5th gen LG chips have
    failed. These 5th gen chips were implanted in the latest LG Innotech
    tuners. If those same tuners are in these new HD sets all bets are off.

    But one dealer has stated that he believes that these new HD sets are
    indeed the real thing. He is loaning us one to test. If they are the
    real thing I'll sell them.

    Bob Miller

    Bob Miller
  3. Archived from groups: alt.video.digital-tv (More info?)

    "Bob Miller" <robmx@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    news:uUJhe.1930$Ri4.1299@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    > Doug McDonald wrote:
    >> John wrote:
    >>
    >>> I noticed that Sharp offers several different widescreen LCD models with
    >>> the same picture size, for example, at the 26" level, there's the
    >>> LC-26GA5U, and then, for about $500 more, they offer the LC-26D5U. For
    >>> the extra 500 beans you get a built-in HDTV tuner with a CableCARD slot.
    >>> Now, could someone explain to me why anyone would buy the more expensive
    >>> model with a built-in HD tuner when seemingly all U.S. cable companies
    >>> that offer HDTV do so with a free external cable box that has the HDTV
    >>> tuner built into it?
    >>
    >>
    >> For $500, it's not clear. At the reasonable price of say $100 more,
    >> it's clear: many people are not interested in cable. At $100 more
    >> you get the convenient built in tuner, so you can watch HDTV
    >> for free.
    >>
    >> A plain over the air HD tuner should add no more than $75 to
    >> the price.
    >>
    >> Doug McDonald
    >
    > It may be possible theoretically to offer an integrated set for $75. But
    > most manufacturers who are STILL in business have learned to factor in all
    > the cost associated with each thing they sell.
    >
    > When they include the 8-VSB receiver in the HDTV set they incur the the
    > added cost of RETURNS when a percentage of buyers actually try to use
    > these integrated receivers and attach an antenna. Horrors! The added cost
    > of returning sets makes retailers steer CORRECTLY most customers who will
    > be attaching their sets to cable to those with NO receiver, a monitor.
    > This eliminates the WASTED cost of the OTA receiver while allowing the
    > retailer to compete with the competition that is doing likewise.
    >
    > The higher cost than Doug thinks is "necessary" is also a way to make sure
    > that few buy integrated sets with their increased HIDDEN cost of returns.
    > A return of a large HDTV set is more costly than the return of STB's that
    > weigh a lot less for one thing. Also the hit a retailer takes in open box
    > specials on integrated HD sets is greater than on an STB based just on the
    > higher total cost.
    >
    > If I were a retailer with current 8-VSB receiver tech I would jack the
    > price as high as it takes to discourage any sales. With the exception of
    > the latest LG integrated sets with 5th gen chips if indeed they have the
    > same tech that we tested last summer. We will hopefully test one next week
    > to see if it is so.
    >
    > I am worried because two receivers we tested with 5th gen LG chips have
    > failed. These 5th gen chips were implanted in the latest LG Innotech
    > tuners. If those same tuners are in these new HD sets all bets are off.
    >
    > But one dealer has stated that he believes that these new HD sets are
    > indeed the real thing. He is loaning us one to test. If they are the real
    > thing I'll sell them.
    >
    > Bob Miller
    >
    > Bob Miller

    Bob,

    Your crazy insistance to make everything an 8-VSB vs COFDM argument is
    tiring.

    The Sharp w/ tuner has both 8-VSB and 256 QAM: Most people will probably
    hook it up to cable TV, where having an integrated tuner is nice, since you
    don't need an external HD cable box.

    It's much more likely the $500 difference is because the set without tuner
    is the older model, which they are dumping at a discounted price, since they
    are mandated to have ATSC tuners in any new sets that can receive
    over-the-air TV of any kind.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.video.digital-tv (More info?)

    "Charles F McDevitt" <Chuck_McDevitt@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:dbydnYn9dZCfORXfRVn-rw@comcast.com...
    >
    > It's much more likely the $500 difference is because the set without tuner
    > is the older model, which they are dumping at a discounted price, since
    > they are mandated to have ATSC tuners in any new sets that can receive
    > over-the-air TV of any kind.
    >

    Well, I doubt that part. I googled this and the tuner-less model was
    released in January of 2005 (not too long ago). All the other Sharp TVs
    that do come with tuners were either released within three months before or
    after that one.

    So, saying that I did have a TV with the HD tuner built-in, with Time Warner
    cable service... would I just be able to plug the cable wire into the set
    and get all channels of digital cable as I did before? Would there be a
    program guide of any sort? I would definitely miss the DVR.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.video.digital-tv (More info?)

    "John" <ijh.abtaerstpoasm@verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:zW5ie.5290$_f7.4136@trndny01...
    > "Charles F McDevitt" <Chuck_McDevitt@comcast.net> wrote in message
    > news:dbydnYn9dZCfORXfRVn-rw@comcast.com...
    >
    > So, saying that I did have a TV with the HD tuner built-in, with Time
    > Warner cable service... would I just be able to plug the cable wire into
    > the set and get all channels of digital cable as I did before? Would
    > there be a program guide of any sort? I would definitely miss the DVR.
    >
    >

    Assuming the tuner is QAM (cable digital) capable, you would probably be
    able to get any local HD channels on your cable system, and possibly the
    music channels. Most cable companies encrypt their other digital
    programming, as they charge extra for it. It would require a box from them
    to get those channels or the program guide.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.video.digital-tv (More info?)

    Mike Rush wrote:
    > "John" <ijh.abtaerstpoasm@verizon.net> wrote in message
    > news:zW5ie.5290$_f7.4136@trndny01...
    >
    >>"Charles F McDevitt" <Chuck_McDevitt@comcast.net> wrote in message
    >>news:dbydnYn9dZCfORXfRVn-rw@comcast.com...
    >>
    >>So, saying that I did have a TV with the HD tuner built-in, with Time
    >>Warner cable service... would I just be able to plug the cable wire into
    >>the set and get all channels of digital cable as I did before? Would
    >>there be a program guide of any sort? I would definitely miss the DVR.
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    > Assuming the tuner is QAM (cable digital) capable, you would probably be
    > able to get any local HD channels on your cable system, and possibly the
    > music channels. Most cable companies encrypt their other digital
    > programming, as they charge extra for it. It would require a box from them
    > to get those channels or the program guide.
    >
    >

    If the TV has a cablecard slot, all you need from the
    cable complany is the card. The card enables decryption.
    Program guide is a different matter at the moment.

    Doug McDonald
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