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Overheating/possibly damage e2180

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January 16, 2009 7:02:02 PM

CPU: Intel e2180 dual-core, MB: Abit IP35-E (2mhz), GFX: ATI 1950x Pro

About 3 months ago I removed the stock heatsink/fan from my cpu to clean a thick layer of dust away - at the time I didn't realise I had to remove the existing pad/grease and add some new paste, which I hadn't done till a few days ago.

I found if I turned the CPU frequency all the way down (to 12x6 - 1200 mhz), it would run reasonably stably in idle (often getting warnings/shutting down while playing games); though it went up to 60-80C with load: rendering (video) was impossible and I had issues playing large movie files (e.g. h.264). Obviously letting it run like this for 3 months = very bad idea, I finally bought some new paste (Arctic Silver 5) a few days ago.

After applying it, Idle temperatures seem to be better than before (down from 50+C to about 32-40C), but running anything cpu intensive pushes it all the way back up to 70-80C). I followed the instructions from Arctic Silver (http://www.arcticsilver.com/pdf/appi..._dual_wcap.pdf - thin line on the heatspreader across where the two cores are) and I'm fairly sure I've done it correctly. I used a CPU heatsink cleaner, non-lint computer wipes etc. to clean it fully - although part of the heatspreader did look sort of dark/faded.

The stock heatsink was extremely stubborn to put back in, and although each corner was fully engaged/twisted the right direction/pushed down, I'm wondering if it might not have made contact properly or if one corner is slightly off level. http://ie.youtube.com/watch?v=OFEOd7nQbuQ

This particular CPU is supposed to run completely stable with stock cooler/heatsink; and I have seen people suggest they can overclock it to 3.0ghz easily without upgrading the cooler/heatsink.


Anyway, I'll try cleaning off the thermal paste and applying it again to see if it makes a difference, though I'm doubtful any difference would be enough since load temperatures are hitting 80C.

- Is it likely that the CPU is damaged and will always have heat issues from now on? e.g. core > heatspreader not transferring heat properly anymore.
- Should I try buying a new heatsink/cooler to see if that improves it; or would it be better to simply buy a new CPU?
- What would be a budget CPU for upgrading - since I'd rather not upgrade everything else at once, unless there's a reasonable chance that there might be damage to the Motherboard socket as well?

Thanks for any help you can give me. :) 

*I have a case fan and 'System' temperature is at 30-32C - which I assume is fine.
*Since adding the thermal paste I've been checking the temperature with Core Temp. The frequency in BIOS is currently set at 200x6, however I've noticed the frequency listed in core temp is flickering between 200x6 and 200x10 (stock speed, 2000mhz).
January 16, 2009 7:42:10 PM

Hi :D 

I would check to ensure that you cleaned the bottom of the heat sink and the cpu thoroughly b4 applying the new paste. I use arctic silver 5 as well, and it's best to use something with a hard edge like a credit card to spread the paste so that there is a very thin coating spread evenly across the whole the top surface of the heat spreader. If the problem persists, then it would appear to be damage to the cpu, in which case a reasonably cheap upgrade is the E2200

http://www.overclockers.co.uk/showproduct.php?prodid=CP...

Hope this helps ;) 
a c 117 à CPUs
January 16, 2009 8:03:07 PM

If not already done, clean it up properly and then apply a nice thin layer (like a sheet of paper) on the base of the heatsink and reinstall it. I doubt your CPU has been damaged. They normally shutdown or throttle before being damaged.

Quote:
The frequency in BIOS is currently set at 200x6, however I've noticed the frequency listed in core temp is flickering between 200x6 and 200x10 (stock speed, 2000mhz).


There's a nice sticky about it and I strongly recommend that you read it. All Core 2 CPUs behave that way.

a b à CPUs
January 16, 2009 8:55:53 PM

2mhz ey?

Intel cpus are next to imposible to burn out, it will be fine!

The stock cooler you gotta know how to fit them correctly - as the box says, to be installed by professional etc

Theres a million guides on overclocking it so scope around
January 17, 2009 9:51:37 AM

Take some alchohol and a bath cloth and wipe both the heatsink and processor completely clean. Anything between is going to cause problems. Then put about half a pea size dab directly onto the processor, and spread it around the top of the processor completely with your thumb, after washing your hands. Be sure to keep it on the processor top, because the thermal paste you purchased is conductive. If you do get it on the 'pin' side of the processor, be sure to ground yourself by touching the bare metal in your case, then use a cotton swab dipped in alchohol to remove any on the pin side of the procc. When everything is done, be sure to correctly seat the heatsink, and to be completely safe, it's best to remove the motherboard so you know for sure that the pins are latched correctly.

Good luck.
January 17, 2009 3:12:54 PM

Draw a diagram of the push pins and their lock/unlock directions. Sounds stupid but it makes pin installation MUCH easier. Once I have made sure all the pins are turned to unlock position, I can usually get the cooler in correctly on the first try. Other than "no" paste, improper cooler installation is the biggest cause of heat problems.

Good luck!
January 17, 2009 4:51:45 PM

Quote:
Take some alchohol and a bath cloth and wipe both the heatsink and processor completely clean. Anything between is going to cause problems. Then put about half a pea size dab directly onto the processor, and spread it around the top of the processor completely with your thumb, after washing your hands.

For the sake of perfection in technique:

1) Any lint-free cloth or paper would work. I use paper towels to get the bulk of compound off, then finish with Q-tips. Good luck cleaning a bath towel of thermal grease. Also use >90% isopropyl. Don't want residual water seeping into the crevices around the heatsink.

2) Green peas? That's way too much compound. Half a grain of rice each, on both the CPU and heatsink, is an oft-cited amount. I'd use more only after confirming that the surfaces are not flat, although the true remedy is to sand the surfaces (but that will void the CPU warranty). I'd also use a little more if during application I find that the grease just doesn't cover the area, i.e., the heatsink area is large.

3) Bare thumb?? At least use a plastic bag to separate your skin from the compound. Better yet, use the edge of a plastic card. Ideally, edge of a razor blade. You want an even, thin application, not ridges and blots.

AS5 may be more tolerant of sloppy application because it is relatively thin so that you can push down on the heatsink, but low-pressure fits and viscous thermal grease will demand more rigorous procedures.


For the OP:

I'd buy a new heatsink/fan. I realized with a recent Q9550 purchase that the stock cooler is absolutely anemic. Intel also makes much bigger stock coolers; obviously an e2180 could go farther on a stock x6800 heatsink, which is twice as big but still arguably "stock".

I'd also fully reset the BIOS - clear CMOS/battery.

Lastly, if one method of AS5 application produces poor results, try another, like the one I outline above. You could also try blob-in-the-middle. Different techniques compensate for sample variations such as uneven surfaces and unusual heat distribution.
January 17, 2009 5:06:06 PM

Never touch the surfaces of your heatsink and CPU after cleaning with alchaol, oils from you skin can cause the thermal paste to break down. I always just place a rice sized spot in the center of the CPU, attach the heatsink, and allow the pressure between the two to do the spreading for me. Also, I would avoid Q-Tips as cotton is far from lint-free. Coffee filters or camera lens cleaning paper are the two most reccomended.
January 17, 2009 6:56:23 PM

Looks like a bad intalled cpucooler to me, i have an e2180 g31 motherboard from gigabyte and i only can reach 2.925 Ghz stable speed(cuz i have a ich7 southbridge not like you ich9 sb...u can go higher on air like 3200), the heat problem is probably cuz the cpu cooler is not well inserted u have to ensure to hear 4 clicks from the cpucooler base...

Good luck... :) 
a b à CPUs
January 18, 2009 6:36:11 AM

ooo said:
Looks like a bad intalled cpucooler to me, i have an e2180 g31 motherboard from gigabyte and i only can reach 2.925 Ghz stable speed(cuz i have a ich7 southbridge not like you ich9 sb...u can go higher on air like 3200), the heat problem is probably cuz the cpu cooler is not well inserted u have to ensure to hear 4 clicks from the cpucooler base...

Good luck... :) 


For intels, that southbridge means nothing for overclocking, as long as its locked (SRC etc) then its of no consequence.
January 21, 2009 8:30:45 PM

Thanks for the replies!

I had read half-a-dozen guides about applying the paste; and I'm fairly sure I got that side of things correct. I used a citrus-based cleaner though ( http://www.sidewindercomputers.com/akticpuhecl.html ), as well as disposable lint-free wipes (apparently suitable for 'computer heatsinks' among other things). From what I've read some types of solvents could have accounted for 1-5 Celsius at most versus using 99% alcohol - but not the extra 20C I'm seeing.

In regards to spreading the paste thinly with a credit card: I've read that it can improve temperatures, but only 1-3C at most, and that it is supposedly much more difficult & hit/miss than putting a single lump in the middle or a short line across where the two cores are situated.

Removing the Motherboard seems like a good idea to make sure I get the processor in properly (although placing every single cable again is going to be frustrating, lol!): I definitely haven't heard a click when I've put the very first pin in, I also had the impression that it *might* be broken (though I couldn't spot anywhere on the plastic pins that looked damaged). It's good to know that Intel CPUs are sturdy though. ;) 

I'll try removing & installing the heatsink/fan another two times; and if that doesn't show an improvement I'll try a new cooler; then I can try a new CPU if I still have issues.
!