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Read Speed v/s Write Speed SSD's

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April 10, 2010 12:34:26 PM

1) when running multiple applications including web apps how much does the read speeds matters as far as using solid state drives are concerned?

2) and what are the implications of write speeds , where does write speed on a SSD come into picture ?

a c 415 G Storage
April 10, 2010 5:40:41 PM

For use as a general-purpose OS and application drive, write speeds are almost irrelevant. The huge majority of accesses are read accesses.

The big advantage of an SSD is it's very fast access times (which are different than transfer rates). They allow the SSD to find lots and lots of files very quickly. This means that a system with the OS and applications on an SSD boots and starts applications much more quickly.

But once an application is up and running, whether or not an SSD helps depends entirely on the application. Some applications don't do much disk I/O as they run, and for those an SSD won't make them run any faster once they're loaded.

Web browsers do tend to deal with lots of little files because web pages usually consist of many files and because the browser caches everything on disk. So an SSD can speed it up (as long as it's using the SSD for its temporary storage).
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a b G Storage
April 10, 2010 5:58:38 PM

^^+1.

Adding to that: To be more specific, it's the 4K random read/write that really matters for an OS drive.

@OP: Read Anandtech's SSD Anthropology and the SSD Relapse.
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April 11, 2010 7:33:42 AM

sminlal said:
For use as a general-purpose OS and application drive, write speeds are almost irrelevant. The huge majority of accesses are read accesses.

The big advantage of an SSD is it's very fast access times (which are different than transfer rates). They allow the SSD to find lots and lots of files very quickly. This means that a system with the OS and applications on an SSD boots and starts applications much more quickly.

But once an application is up and running, whether or not an SSD helps depends entirely on the application. Some applications don't do much disk I/O as they run, and for those an SSD won't make them run any faster once they're loaded.

Web browsers do tend to deal with lots of little files because web pages usually consist of many files and because the browser caches everything on disk. So an SSD can speed it up (as long as it's using the SSD for its temporary storage).



what do you think about stock market .exe applications which run in real time and involve hundreds of data points refreshing every second?

will a .exe app running from a SSD speed up data refresh rate being accessed from a stock exchange server?

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a c 415 G Storage
April 11, 2010 8:01:42 AM

capital_one said:
what do you think about stock market .exe applications which run in real time and involve hundreds of data points refreshing every second?

I have no idea how that software works - the key question is whether or not it does a lot of disk I/O as it runs. If you're running Windows 7, use Resource Monitor to check the disk I/O rates of the program - if they're significant then an SSD could potentially help.
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April 11, 2010 9:40:29 AM

sminlal said:
I have no idea how that software works - the key question is whether or not it does a lot of disk I/O as it runs. If you're running Windows 7, use Resource Monitor to check the disk I/O rates of the program - if they're significant then an SSD could potentially help.



ok,

so what do you think is the role of data fetching from the SSD to the RAM sticks,?

is data fetching faster to and from the RAM if the RAM is reading from the SSD ?

isn't all the data read from the SSD loaded next into the RAM arrays for any .exe programme ?
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a c 415 G Storage
April 11, 2010 10:21:30 AM

RAM is instant compared to any drive, SSD or not. For all intents and purposes the RAM is never a bottleneck.

If your stock market program receives data over a network connection it will go into RAM first. The question then is whether it needs to access the disk drive - for example to save the data or to compare it to previous data. And if so, what kind of access is it - a simple dump to a log-like file, writing various pieces of data to separate files or database updates that may require index lookups and updates. The more disk accesses the program does, the more likely it is that an SSD would help the program run faster.
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April 11, 2010 6:40:43 PM

capital_one said:
what do you think about stock market .exe applications which run in real time and involve hundreds of data points refreshing every second?

will a .exe app running from a SSD speed up data refresh rate being accessed from a stock exchange server?

http://www.thinkpipes.com/content/desktop_shot_3_big_framed.png


That app is accessing (inputting) data from a server. It is not reading it from the HD (if anything, it is the server that is doing the I/O), and it has no reason to write the data to the HD. Anything it would save to the HD would be so small that there would be no noticeable difference between a SSD and HD.
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April 12, 2010 10:16:33 AM

DXRick said:
That app is accessing (inputting) data from a server. It is not reading it from the HD (if anything, it is the server that is doing the I/O), and it has no reason to write the data to the HD. Anything it would save to the HD would be so small that there would be no noticeable difference between a SSD and HD.



what i feel is there are two aspects

a) the data coming in from the stock exchange server, refreshing every second ..the price and volume data and related columns,

b) the .exe programme residing on the SSD and running from the SSD and showing that server data and giving multiple options of working around that data, like various order windows, financial calculations windows , i think since these are part of the .exe programme, therefore they all must be being read from the SSD only, and in this meantime the .exe programme is accessing all its executibles from the ssd only. while (I) it works around the data which is filling in from the stock exchange server, in the form of tickers directly into the RAM sticks


http://www.ftindia.com/solutions/brokerageSolutions/odi...

http://www.interactivebrokers.co.in/en/p.php?f=tws&ib_e...
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April 12, 2010 3:14:36 PM

Yes! SSDs are faster at reading data and launching programs.
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