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How much heat (and time) does it take to destroy a processor?

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February 2, 2009 7:54:27 PM

I have HP DV2500 laptop with a C2D T7300 processor and a Geforce 8400M GS graphics card. It gets very hot. I had another thread a few months ago about this, but none of the cooling solutions helped that much. My cores idol at ~50C and the GPU at ~55C. The CPU and GPU both get up to the 70's and 80's under load. My computer has been like this for the 1.5 years that I've owned it. Last night my computer messed up and somehow stayed at full load all night. This resulted in the CPU being at about 94C for ten straight hours. My computer

How will these high temperatures affect the life of the laptop? Will it eventually destroy the CPU or any other crucial part of the computer? How long do you think the CPU will last at these temperatures? Does Intel's warranty include processors bought in a pre-made laptop?

(That's right, 94C. I can almost boil water with my laptop.)
a b à CPUs
February 2, 2009 10:31:00 PM

That is hot but expected in a laptop. Also, mobile processors use high grade silicon capable of taking more heat than your average desktop chip (they also throttle at a higher temp). Other components will probably fail from the heat before the CPU.
a b à CPUs
February 2, 2009 11:58:24 PM

Laptops are meant to run hotter, and I've had mine up to well over 80C many times. I wouldn't worry with laptops until 100C+
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February 3, 2009 1:25:58 AM

Umm it takes 121-131C to melt a cpu.
a b à CPUs
February 3, 2009 1:29:40 AM

shiftstealth said:
Umm it takes 121-131C to melt a cpu.

More than that. Thermal shutdown occurs around this temperature range. It also depends on what part of the CPU you mean. Silicon melts over 1400C, and I'm pretty sure the rest of the laptop would have warped a little by then.
February 3, 2009 1:31:19 AM

Regardless of the quality of the silicon, ~94c for 10 straight hours is more than likely semi-disastrous. However its probably safe to assume you will be buying a new laptop due to age before that CPU "begins to die".
February 3, 2009 2:00:24 AM

Quote:
Other components will probably fail from the heat before the CPU.

That really doesn't make me feel much better. Any one component dies, the entire laptop is pretty much ruined.

Quote:
Silicon melts over 1400C

Silicon may not melt, but other things in my laptop will melt before then. I guess I'm more concerned about my other components. At least I can replace a burnt out processor.

Quote:
Regardless of the quality of the silicon, ~94c for 10 straight hours is more than likely semi-disastrous. However its probably safe to assume you will be buying a new laptop due to age before that CPU "begins to die".

I was planning on keeping this laptop for another 2.5 years. That's why I ask. If my computer is likely to die soon, I'd like to sell it while it's actually worth something. Is there an actual chance of the laptop dying? Or do you think I'm just being paranoid?
February 3, 2009 2:17:57 AM

Honestly it might be a toss up, 50/50. Ive rarely encountered Intel/AMD/Windows based laptops that hold up against the test of time, even my wifes DV6863 which is less than a year old runs like pure **** now. Ive also encountered a 5 year old Apple iBook with a 700mhz G3 and 640MB of RAM that ran smoother and faster than a 2.0ghz C2D laptop with 2GB of RAM.

Im not trying to enhance youre paranoia sorry, I think youll be fine as long as you dont let those temps get like that again.
a b à CPUs
February 3, 2009 2:19:36 AM

There's little change of the CPU dieing before the laptop becomes obsolete, however I'd look at trying to get some air around it while it's working hard. Propping it up to allow airflow around the vents underneath (if there are some) can help with temps.

The motherboard and battery are more suceptible to heat than the CPU. I have a friend whose 12" Dell XPS burned out 3 mobos from playing games. The battery won't bomb all of a sudden, but higher temperatures increase Lithium Ion battery aging whether it's being used or not. It's the maximum capacity that is affected.
a b à CPUs
February 3, 2009 4:56:38 AM

spathotan said:
Regardless of the quality of the silicon, ~94c for 10 straight hours is more than likely semi-disastrous. However its probably safe to assume you will be buying a new laptop due to age before that CPU "begins to die".

Semi disastrous?

Not likely - according to the intel spec, it's rated to 100C.
a b à CPUs
February 3, 2009 5:01:52 AM

C'mon just stick a fan under the laptop... I remember when I used to have a Macbook, how it used to burn my lap.
a b à CPUs
February 3, 2009 6:58:04 AM

I'm agreeing with having it propped up, or something similar or you can get those little wedges that have extra fans to help keep cool if it worries you but it should be fine.
a b à CPUs
February 3, 2009 11:23:59 AM

...I could make a case for 80C, but 94 is simply too hot. Try an underside fan...

Seriously though, someone needs to figure a way to keep laptops cool, before someone burns something down...
February 3, 2009 2:06:36 PM

Quote:
Seriously though, someone needs to figure a way to keep laptops cool, before someone burns something down...

I've tried a cooling pad, a rear cooling fan, propping it up several different ways, and just about every other possible cooling technique. Together, all my ideas and money did less than 5C of good. I think that the graphics card is too much for this laptop, and the fan was made to be quiet not efficient.

Quote:
Semi disastrous? Not likely - according to the intel spec, it's rated to 100C.

Even if the processor is rated at 100C, I doubt it's good to be constantly in the high 70-80-90C. Plus if the motherboard or GPU burns out then I might as well sell it for parts.

Quote:
Honestly it might be a toss up, 50/50. Ive rarely encountered Intel/AMD/Windows based laptops that hold up against the test of time.

50/50? That really scares me. I don't mind selling my laptop now and buying a new computer, but if I completely lose my investment it'll really suck. Does anyone else agree that this is a realistic chance of something failing soon?
a b à CPUs
February 3, 2009 4:18:40 PM

I meant a diffrent way entirly of cooling laptops, as current methods simply do not work well enough...
a b à CPUs
February 3, 2009 5:01:43 PM

I would say it's fine. Intel rates their maximum temperatures extraordinarily conservatively, and if they say it can take 100C, they tend to mean that it can take 100C at max voltage for 7 years straight, or something like that.
February 3, 2009 5:45:40 PM

^^ Agree.
February 3, 2009 8:36:56 PM

Like I said earlier I wasnt trying to scare you Doug or put you in denial. Im sure youre machine will be fine.
February 4, 2009 6:47:23 AM

JESUS CHRIST MONKEYBALLS!!!! Yea, 94 for 10 hours straight is not good! But this is wierd and shouldn't happen. Don't C2D start to throtle after 90 degrees?
February 4, 2009 4:44:05 PM

Yep, 94C for 10 straight hours. According to the task manager, it was firefox that was taking up 100% of both cores. I guess it was just a fluke, but it still happened. I don't know how it was so stable, but it let me open the task manager easily.
a b à CPUs
February 4, 2009 6:14:13 PM

blashyrkh said:
JESUS CHRIST MONKEYBALLS!!!! Yea, 94 for 10 hours straight is not good! But this is wierd and shouldn't happen. Don't C2D start to throtle after 90 degrees?

Nope. Laptops will run happily at that temp.

You should really look at the spec - Intel rates their desktop CPUs for 72-75C typically, and people here wouldn't be freaking out over a temperature 6 degrees below that (66-69C). The laptop CPUs are designed and rated for up to 100C, specifically because LAPTOPS RUN HOTTER. It isn't that hard to understand. My T7600G has run at 85+C for hours on end before. It is still running fine. I have no concerns.

Don't worry. It is absolutely fine.
June 3, 2009 1:34:20 AM

Quote:
Don't worry. It is absolutely fine.


For all those wondering, it takes just under two years.
!