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How to Fix Usable Memory the Correct Way???

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March 11, 2010 1:36:22 PM

I've been reading some information and now I have 8GB of memory in my system on a 32bit Windows 7 Ultimate
Even before I was running 4GB of memory and it said 3.50GB Usable, Not it has to do with some with dedicated shard memory with the video card.
Now How can I have full gain control over my memory. The onboard has to be disable???? or is it fine how I have it now?

The Specs are

Intel i5 750 Quad Core
Zalman 9700
Gigabyte GA P55 USB3 (mobo)
ATI Radeon 5850 1GB GDDR5
Crucial Ballistix Tracers 8GB 1333 memory
Windows 7 Ultimate 32bit
March 11, 2010 2:16:02 PM

Yes I was reading that today and been looking at the resource monitor

Hardware Reserved is 517MB
In Use is 1037MB
Modified is 105MB
standby is 952MB
Free 5581
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Related resources
a b } Memory
a b $ Windows 7
a b K Overclocking
March 11, 2010 2:48:45 PM

Only way would be to change to the 64 bit version ! - All 32 bit Oses can only address 4GB of memory (4gb = 2^32 which is the max number of storage spaces they can address ) to be able to address more from within the OS you need to change to a 64 bit OS which then can address 2^64 address spaces (7TB) since the system needs to have a specific address space that it can access for each memory bit in order to keep track of it. So currently you have 4GB of memory that you can not use until you change to a 64 bit OS ! - so unless you plan to upgrade to a 64 bit version you'd be better off returning those memory modules.
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March 11, 2010 3:15:09 PM

JDFan said:
Only way would be to change to the 64 bit version ! - All 32 bit Oses can only address 4GB of memory (4gb = 2^32 which is the max number of storage spaces they can address ) to be able to address more from within the OS you need to change to a 64 bit OS which then can address 2^64 address spaces (7TB) since the system needs to have a specific address space that it can access for each memory bit in order to keep track of it. So currently you have 4GB of memory that you can not use until you change to a 64 bit OS ! - so unless you plan to upgrade to a 64 bit version you'd be better off returning those memory modules.

Why return them when I have to pay a 15% open box/restock fee/??
What you are saying about 64bit is a good idea but I always have W7U and I am happy with what I have.
I Just keep them to sell them to someone. Luck for me when I open a package i don't going crazy and just cut it out like a wild person.
I cut the ends from right to left just in case.
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Best solution

a b } Memory
a b $ Windows 7
a b K Overclocking
March 11, 2010 3:37:30 PM

TLDR version: Install a 64 bit version of the OS.


Long Version:

In a computer all bytes in the memory system need a unique name. This is called an address. For example, if you have 2 GB of main memory, then there are 2147483648 bytes of RAM in your machine, each of which require an address for the operating system to communicate to it. To give these all an address you need 31 bits to do it. Now, if/when you have 32 bits, you can name 4 GB (2 bytes to the 32nd power = 4GB).

This is why the total addressable space available in a 32 bit OS is 4GB – the OS runs out of addresses and cannot communicate/locate any more bytes of memory because of that.

You may think ”Hey, 4GB of address space… 4GB of RAM… What’s the problem” The problem is that memory isn’t the only thing needing an address. If you install a total of 4GB worth of RAM, the system will detect/use/display less than 4GB of total memory because of address space allocation for other critical functions, such as:

- System BIOS (including motherboard, add-on cards, etc..)
- Motherboards resources
- Memory mapped I/O
- Configuration for AGP/PCI-Ex/PCI
- Other memory allocations for PCI devices

Different onboard devices and different add-on cards (devices) will result of different total memory size. e.g. more PCI cards installed will require more memory resources, resulting of less memory free for other uses.

This limitation applies to most chipsets & Windows XP/Vista 32-bit version operating systems. Again, this is a limitation of the Operating System not having enough address space to allocate to the system *and* the RAM. Not allocating address space to devices renders them inoperable. Not allocating addresses to RAM simply results in the unaddressed section not being used in an otherwise fully functional computer. Therefore the OS designers assign RAM last.


If you install a Windows operating system, and if more than 3GB memory is required for your system, then the below conditions must be met:

1. A memory controller which supports memory swap functionality is used. The latest chipsets like Intel 975X, 955X, Nvidia NF4 SLI Intel Edition, Nvidia NF4 SLI X16, AMD K8 and newer architectures can support the memory swap function.

2. Installation of Windows XP Pro X64 Ed. (64-bit), Windows Vista 64, or other OS which can provide more than 4GB worth of address space.



Note: Windows Vista 32bit SP1 and newer will display the installed amount of RAM. This is a display change only.



MSFT’s Page stating XP is 4GB of RAM and 4GB Only
http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/system/platform/server/PA...

Technet on Superfetch/Readyboost
http://blogs.technet.com/askperf/archive/2007/03/29/win...

Great Article on the Where’s Why’s and Benefits of a 64 bit OS and Memory:
http://www.gamasutra.com/view/feature/3602/sponsored_fe...

Who Ate My Memory
http://blogs.msdn.com/dcook/archive/2007/03/25/who-ate-...

How to get around it?!?!?!
http://www.geoffchappell.com/viewer.htm?doc=notes/windo...

Phoronix comparison of 32 bit, 32 bit PAE, and 64 bit kernels
http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=ubun...



Official MSDN page on memory limits
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa366778(VS.85).aspx

Mark Russinovich on Physical Memory
http://blogs.technet.com/markrussinovich/archive/2008/0...

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March 11, 2010 7:47:59 PM

Best answer selected by Keiki646.
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a b K Overclocking
March 11, 2010 9:37:11 PM

The link I posted in your first response included this: pretty self explanatory.
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March 12, 2010 12:18:00 AM

Keiki646 said:
Why return them when I have to pay a 15% open box/restock fee/??
What you are saying about 64bit is a good idea but I always have W7U and I am happy with what I have.
I Just keep them to sell them to someone. Luck for me when I open a package i don't going crazy and just cut it out like a wild person.
I cut the ends from right to left just in case.


Do you have reatail disks, if so you can just reinstall Windows as a 64-bit install. If its OEM you may be able to order the 64-bit restore CD's. That does involve a bit of work (have to backup, reinstall programs, etc) but if you paln on suing this PC for a while it may be worth it.
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March 12, 2010 9:20:53 AM

kamel5547 said:
Do you have reatail disks, if so you can just reinstall Windows as a 64-bit install. If its OEM you may be able to order the 64-bit restore CD's. That does involve a bit of work (have to backup, reinstall programs, etc) but if you paln on suing this PC for a while it may be worth it.



Yes I have retail disk, but I have a lot of work on my computer as we speak and I am not going to reinstalled 64 bit right now.
RJR and Scotteq gave me an idea about it already but maybe in the future for my future Build that I am planning in 6 months.
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April 29, 2010 2:34:03 AM

hey... ask RJR to give you the link to the free ram website, it helps better than all that techno-babble crappola... really
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