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using PCI-E card on AGP slot

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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December 6, 2008 6:06:59 PM

Hi,
Is it possible to insert a PCI Express graphic card into an AGP slot? I have Radeon 9200 (8x AGP) and I want to replace it with a new one. I noticed that new graphic cards are produced in PCI-E model.

Can I use them or I have to buy an old adapter (but newer than mine)?

More about : pci card agp slot

December 6, 2008 6:17:42 PM

AGP and PCI-E dont play together. You will have to either get an AGP card, or a new motherboard that has PCI-E slot(s).
December 6, 2008 6:19:23 PM

you cannot use a PCIE card in an AGP slot. There are some inexpensive AGP cards out there that are really good and include new features as found in pcie cards (dx10, shader 4, etc..). Take a look at the best graphics cards for the money on this site or look on newegg.com.
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December 6, 2008 6:30:34 PM

lol, using a converter for pcie to agp. that article is from 2005 and I bet the demand has been huge as of late. Doubtful you will find one, but even so i would make darn sure i knew all the info about it before i go that route. there are plenty of great AGP cards around should you choose to keep the board you have. this is probably the last of them so beyond that you will probably have to finally upgrade.
a c 106 U Graphics card
December 6, 2008 6:49:51 PM

NO.

Buy a new motherboard (which will probably mean you CPU and RAM as well), or get an AGP card online.
December 7, 2008 3:08:16 AM

But I saw some ATI cards that says: AGP configuration is supported by bridge. How about them? What does this bridge mean?

I think that bridge is the same as woshitudou said.
December 8, 2008 1:00:49 AM

mahmood said:
But I saw some ATI cards that says: AGP configuration is supported by bridge. How about them? What does this bridge mean?

I think that bridge is the same as woshitudou said.


No. This is referring to a chip that's on the PCB of all new ATI AGP boards that enables the PCI-e native processing core of the graphics card to be scaled for use on the AGP bus. The fact that they're both called bridges is coincidental.

EDIT: If you're looking for a new GPU, I suggest you get a x1650. For most AGP-era CPUs, the x1650 is overkill.
December 8, 2008 4:25:30 AM

rolli59 said:
Instead of looking for an adapter why not a new agp card.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=E...


Yes, x1650 is a good one as frozenlead said.

frozenlead said:
No. This is referring to a chip that's on the PCB of all new ATI AGP boards that enables the PCI-e native processing core of the graphics card to be scaled for use on the AGP bus. The fact that they're both called bridges is coincidental.

I am not convinced....
If a card is PCI-E, and the slots of PCI-E and AGP are different, then why should they put a bridge on it to work in AGP mode

OR

If they put a bridge on PCI-E card to work in AGP mode, then logically it could be used in AGP slot.
a b U Graphics card
December 8, 2008 2:08:23 PM

You don't understand what is menat by bridge.

The "bridge" is a chip on the card that allows the PCIx CORE to communicate with an AGP bus. This is rewuired as it effectively "slows" the communication of the GPU with the bus. The bridge is an integrated chip on the card, you cant just slap one on. The GPU core on the newest agp card and their brother pcix versions are the same (roughly). The bridge allows the pcix chips to work on an AGP board as you cant just slap a chip to an AGP board and expect it to work if it is designed for PCIx.

Cheers
a b U Graphics card
December 8, 2008 3:10:44 PM

I am reminded of a fellow that thought that by going at his card with a cutting tool to make it fit in the slot it would work... as who needs all those extra pins. I mean no offence by being reminded of that, it was just funny. and started with a similar question.

Simply put PCIx cards do not and will never work in an AGP slot, you need an agp card, period. However there are those smart guys out there that made an agp card work in a PCIx slot. But dont let that trick you into thinking it can go the other way.. if a card needs x bandwidth and the slot only provides half that its not the same as if the card needs x/2 bandwidth but the bus provides x. A pcix card must be stepped down to communicate on an AGP bus, hence the need for a bridge chip.

I hope that sort of clears up what a bridge chip is for and why its not something that you can simply do yourself (unless you have a masters in semiconductor engineering and a pretty sweat lab).
December 9, 2008 10:18:58 AM

ok thanks
a c 271 U Graphics card
April 26, 2011 6:04:22 PM

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