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USB Header to Internal SATA Drive Connector Cable?

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April 22, 2010 12:18:04 AM

External USB to SATA connectors and enclosures are common. Is there a cable to connect a motherboard USB header to an internal SATA drive? The drive would be powered the usual way rather than though the USB header. I understand that bandwidth would suffer.
April 22, 2010 2:15:47 AM

dealcorn said:
External USB to SATA connectors and enclosures are common. Is there a cable to connect a motherboard USB header to an internal SATA drive? The drive would be powered the usual way rather than though the USB header. I understand that bandwidth would suffer.


No. First of all, it's not just a cable but a cable with a controller. Second, the front-panel ports are low-power, so you'd need a low-power drive to make it work. If you can live with that, buy the external part and use an internal-to-external USB breakout cable, internally, to connect the USB port to the USB header.
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April 22, 2010 9:41:03 AM

The controller is a problem. However, if the internal SATA drive is plugged into the computers main power supply, I am surprised that a low power drive is required.
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April 22, 2010 10:14:08 AM

dealcorn said:
The controller is a problem. However, if the internal SATA drive is plugged into the computers main power supply, I am surprised that a low power drive is required.

You asked about powering the drive through USB, and I believe the port has overload protection. USB 2.0 is rated at 500mA, and I have several drives that will run only from the rear ports (not the front ports) which might be due to resistance among the extra connections siphoning away a few mA. Basically, you're limited to "most" 2.5" drives or SSD drives, while a few "high performance" 2.5" mechanical drives (several Seagate Momentus) models won't get enough "startup current".

Now, if you connect the drive directly to the power supply, you can get around that problem.
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April 22, 2010 3:42:40 PM

The question is why? You have a SATA drive that you will be installing internally. If you are out of SATA ports, just get an add-on SATA card. USB is slower so I don't see the gain in running an internal SATA drive via a USB header.
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April 23, 2010 1:18:31 AM

An add-on SATA card generally requires an available PCI or PCIE slot.
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May 3, 2010 8:01:41 PM

I have the same question. An Antec 200 case, with 6 internal 3.5 drive bays that have drives. This case also includes an external front-loaded hot swap 3.5" SATA hard drive caddy. My Gigabyte GA-MA785G-UD3H has only 6 sata connectors on the MB. The caddy is powered by an internal connector. I just want to be able to attach the caddy's sata connector to the usb header. OS is Windows Home Server. Really don't want to add any more SATA ports, as it's just the caddy. I'm not concerned about the speed as any disk in the caddy would not be used "full" time.


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January 4, 2011 6:17:27 AM

How about one of THESE?

Just thought I might add something useful for those like me who stumble across this little thread. it's a mini board with sata/satapower connections, as well as an internal usb connection and sp4 power connection. in my opinion its the best way to do something like the original poster was looking for, with the least amount of clutter.
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January 4, 2011 6:27:19 AM

ergohack said:
How about one of THESE?

Just thought I might add something useful for those like me who stumble across this little thread. it's a mini board with sata/satapower connections, as well as an internal usb connection and sp4 power connection. in my opinion its the best way to do something like the original poster was looking for, with the least amount of clutter.
It's made to snap onto the custom header of an mini-SATA optical drive? I think he's looking for something for his hard drive? I guess the thing could be modified to support it...
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