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Can Palms read common file formats yet?

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Anonymous
May 29, 2005 3:29:33 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

I've got a Palm III. Every now and then I think about upgrading,
but I don't want to get a new Palm if it cannot read common file
formats such as TXT and HTML. Has the Palm OS progressed far
enough that it is able to read TXT files yet? Or do they still
need to be translated?
Anonymous
May 29, 2005 4:13:07 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

Al Smith wrote:
> I've got a Palm III. Every now and then I think about upgrading, but I
> don't want to get a new Palm if it cannot read common file formats such
> as TXT and HTML. Has the Palm OS progressed far enough that it is able
> to read TXT files yet? Or do they still need to be translated?

These file formats are supported by third party apps - Palm Fiction
http://palmfiction.sourceforge.net/ is free, open source, and will open
a heap of common formats including txt, ztxt and some html with no
conversion necessary. Video and audio formats don't require conversion,
either.

For html, though, I prefer to use sunrise/plucker combination which does
require conversion. There is a sunrise plugin for Firefox that makes
getting converted documents onto your Palm really easy.

For other weird formats vikao will handle lots of stuff but isn't as
convenient to use as conversion is necessary.

I had a Palm IIIxe for a while, and have never regretted upgrading to a
T3 as I'm continually finding more filetypes and applications are usable
with it; for example, TCPMP handles many common types of media files
effortlessly, I don't even have to convert files to a lower size or
bitrate before playing them, with slight overclocking TCPMP will play
VCD quality files without skipping frames.

I'd say that most common formats are supported, often not requiring any
conversion at all, and the remainder have good tools to deal with
conversion if necessary.
Anonymous
May 29, 2005 9:23:14 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

>> I've got a Palm III. Every now and then I think about upgrading, but I don't want to get a new Palm if it cannot read common file formats such as TXT and HTML. Has the Palm OS progressed far enough that it is able to read TXT files yet? Or do they still need to be translated?
>
>
> These file formats are supported by third party apps - Palm Fiction http://palmfiction.sourceforge.net/ is free, open source, and will open a heap of common formats including txt, ztxt and some html with no conversion necessary. Video and audio formats don't require conversion, either.
>
> For html, though, I prefer to use sunrise/plucker combination which does require conversion. There is a sunrise plugin for Firefox that makes getting converted documents onto your Palm really easy.
>
> For other weird formats vikao will handle lots of stuff but isn't as convenient to use as conversion is necessary.
>
> I had a Palm IIIxe for a while, and have never regretted upgrading to a T3 as I'm continually finding more filetypes and applications are usable with it; for example, TCPMP handles many common types of media files effortlessly, I don't even have to convert files to a lower size or bitrate before playing them, with slight overclocking TCPMP will play VCD quality files without skipping frames.
>
> I'd say that most common formats are supported, often not requiring any conversion at all, and the remainder have good tools to deal with conversion if necessary.

Thanks for the response. It probably won't be long before I
upgrade, so the question is whether it should be a Palm or a
Windows version. I've always liked the simplicity of the Palm
interface, but its inability to simply load a TXT file and open it
with any reader has been one of its biggest drawbacks, since I use
my Palm mostly for reading e-books.
Related resources
Anonymous
May 29, 2005 9:23:15 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

Al Smith wrote:
> Thanks for the response. It probably won't be long before I upgrade, so
> the question is whether it should be a Palm or a Windows version. I've
> always liked the simplicity of the Palm interface, but its inability to
> simply load a TXT file and open it with any reader has been one of its
> biggest drawbacks, since I use my Palm mostly for reading e-books.

I was on the same page as you when I decided to ditch my palmIIIxe and
go for the Ipaq. "For crying out loud?!? Why wouldn't a palm open a
standard format like txt," I wailed. I'll show them! I'll jump ship and
go to the more sensible Ipaq which does everything the palm does and
more... including reading standard MS formats as well as .txt.

Within a month I'd quit carrying my palmtop. What had once been a major
part of my work life had become slow, cumbersome, and the battery life
was laughable. I was disillusioned with the whole palmtop experience
then and it was a year or so before I put my toe in the waters again and
I went the palm route because I had better memories of it. It's back to
being indispensable again.

If you know someone that's gotta wince type device try and borrow it for
a week or so and see if you can get accustomed to just how SLOW it is
compared to the palm, and can stand being chained to an outlet because
the battery life just doesn't compare IMO.

Seriously, the palm to wince street is really crowded on the way back to
palm in my experience.

--
http://www.simplerich.com/blog

Read my book!!!
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1411617576/
Anonymous
May 29, 2005 9:37:24 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

Al Smith <invalid@address.com> wrote:

> I've always liked the simplicity of the Palm
>interface, but its inability to simply load a TXT file and open it
>with any reader has been one of its biggest drawbacks, since I use
>my Palm mostly for reading e-books.

There are Palm readers that open txt files directly from the SD card that work
quite well. I use TiBR Pro. Another is ISilo. Also mentioned is the free
PalmFiction, but I have found a search function problem in it so don't use it
regularly. However one nice feature of PalmFiction is that it will convert a txt
file on the card to a pdb file in memory in seconds if you want to read it on
the Palm and remove the card.

I prefer to keep my books on one 1GB card (1000+ novels) and that way I can just
transfer the card when I change machines, and the books are still available. If
I transfer the reader history file my open books are all ready to go on the new
machine. Very handy...
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 4:07:04 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

>> Thanks for the response. It probably won't be long before I upgrade, so the question is whether it should be a Palm or a Windows version. I've always liked the simplicity of the Palm interface, but its inability to simply load a TXT file and open it with any reader has been one of its biggest drawbacks, since I use my Palm mostly for reading e-books.
>
>
> I was on the same page as you when I decided to ditch my palmIIIxe and go for the Ipaq. "For crying out loud?!? Why wouldn't a palm open a standard format like txt," I wailed. I'll show them! I'll jump ship and go to the more sensible Ipaq which does everything the palm does and more... including reading standard MS formats as well as .txt.
>
> Within a month I'd quit carrying my palmtop. What had once been a major part of my work life had become slow, cumbersome, and the battery life was laughable. I was disillusioned with the whole palmtop experience then and it was a year or so before I put my toe in the waters again and I went the palm route because I had better memories of it. It's back to being indispensable again.

Battery life is important to me, also. Right now I'm on
rechargeable AAA batteries. I've got two sets, charge up set two
when I install set one, then there's always a charged set ready. I
wouldn't really want a built in rechargeable battery that only
lasts an hour and a half. That's another big consideration.
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 4:07:05 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

Al Smith wrote:
> Battery life is important to me, also. Right now I'm on rechargeable
AAA
> batteries. I've got two sets, charge up set two when I install set one,
> then there's always a charged set ready. I wouldn't really want a built
> in rechargeable battery that only lasts an hour and a half. That's
> another big consideration.

A friend of mine had one of the wince types (not sure which one) and he
built an add on battery pack for it that took AA's and he'd use that
velcroed to the back... if he were I real man I told him he'd've used
duct tape, but that's not the point.

I considered it, but then remembered I fly a lot and didn't really think
I wanted some homemade wire and battery contraption floating around in
my luggage going through security lol.

--
http://www.simplerich.com/blog

Read my book!!!
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1411617576/
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 10:35:16 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

Al Smith <invalid@address.com> wrote:

>Battery life is important to me, also. Right now I'm on
>rechargeable AAA batteries...
>I wouldn't really want a built in rechargeable battery that only
>lasts an hour and a half.

Most modern Palms last around 4 hours unless you're doing some very heavy stuff
that your AAA model likely couldn't handle anyway...
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 5:55:00 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

Al Smith wrote:
>>> Thanks for the response. It probably won't be long before I upgrade,
>>> so the question is whether it should be a Palm or a Windows version.
>>> I've always liked the simplicity of the Palm interface, but its
>>> inability to simply load a TXT file and open it with any reader has
>>> been one of its biggest drawbacks, since I use my Palm mostly for
>>> reading e-books.
>>
>>
>>
>> I was on the same page as you when I decided to ditch my palmIIIxe and
>> go for the Ipaq. "For crying out loud?!? Why wouldn't a palm open a
>> standard format like txt," I wailed. I'll show them! I'll jump ship
>> and go to the more sensible Ipaq which does everything the palm does
>> and more... including reading standard MS formats as well as .txt.
>>
>> Within a month I'd quit carrying my palmtop. What had once been a
>> major part of my work life had become slow, cumbersome, and the
>> battery life was laughable. I was disillusioned with the whole palmtop
>> experience then and it was a year or so before I put my toe in the
>> waters again and I went the palm route because I had better memories
>> of it. It's back to being indispensable again.
>
>
> Battery life is important to me, also. Right now I'm on rechargeable AAA
> batteries. I've got two sets, charge up set two when I install set one,
> then there's always a charged set ready. I wouldn't really want a built
> in rechargeable battery that only lasts an hour and a half. That's
> another big consideration.

That, for me, was a real disincentive to upgrade from a IIIxe - I really
thought that replaceable NiMH batteries were the way to go, and almost
all recent devices use built in cells.

However, the T3 (and other modern Palms) offer so many advantages - many
of them will change the way you use your Palm - that in the end, it
really didn't matter. The T3's capabilities are astounding; a huge leap
ahead of earlier Palms (T1 and T2 included).

Having said that, battery life on my T3 is appalling, pretty much
requiring a recharge every one or two days, more often under heavy use
(especially multimedia; ebooks aren't so bad) and after 18 months the
battery capacity has deteriorated to about 50% of what benchmarks
measured when the T3 was new. I notice some others with T3s of similar
age to mine have commented on this.

I'll have to replace the onboard battery eventually, but to counteract
this meantime I've just bought a couple of Palm Power To Go sleds, and
I'm quite impressed with them so far. They seem to be a little hard to
find (especially here in NZ) but eXpansys have some pretty sharp pricing
on Palm stuff, and they ship worldwide. I figured that now will be the
best time to buy PTGs as Palm no longer seem to list them online, and
with the move away from the univeral connector, supplies of lots of UC
accesories are going to dry up.
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 1:23:00 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

AaronJ wrote:
> -=rjh=- <usually@mail.com> wrote:
>
>
>>I'll have to replace the onboard [T3] battery eventually...
>
>
> Why put up with a bad battery when a new one is only $30?
>
> http://www.gethightech.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen...

As I said, I'll replace it eventually, but in the meantime, there are
warranty issues to resolve.
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 1:23:01 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

-=rjh=- <usually@mail.com> wrote:

>AaronJ wrote:
>> -=rjh=- <usually@mail.com> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>I'll have to replace the onboard [T3] battery eventually...
>>
>>
>> Why put up with a bad battery when a new one is only $30?
>>
>> http://www.gethightech.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen...
>
>As I said, I'll replace it eventually, but in the meantime, there are
>warranty issues to resolve.

A T3 still under warranty? I didn't realize that was possible or I wouldn't have
bothered with the suggestion. Sorry.
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 5:51:48 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

>>Battery life is important to me, also. Right now I'm on
>>>rechargeable AAA batteries...
>>>I wouldn't really want a built in rechargeable battery that only
>>>lasts an hour and a half.
>
>
> Most modern Palms last around 4 hours unless you're doing some very heavy stuff
> that your AAA model likely couldn't handle anyway...

Yes, but for me the trouble would be downtime. If I'm reading a
novel (as I usually do on my Palm -- I seldom read paper books
anymore) and I'm in the middle and the built-in battery runs out,
I don't want to have to wait an hour or whatever until it charges
up again. I wonder if the latest Palms have transformers you can
plug into the wall? I must do some research on the Palm site.
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 9:31:02 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

Al Smith <invalid@address.com> wrote:

>Yes, but for me the trouble would be downtime. If I'm reading a
>novel (as I usually do on my Palm -- I seldom read paper books
>anymore)

I've now logged over a 100 novels on the small screen. I'm also hooked.

>and I'm in the middle and the built-in battery runs out,
>I don't want to have to wait an hour or whatever until it charges
>up again.

That would take pretty poor planning. If you leave the Palm on the charger
overnight you will have a full charge in the morning. That's about 4 hours
reading. I usually read about 2 hours a day so never even come close to a
battery problem. BTW having read a large percentage of those novels on a mono
screen I can tell you that a high resolution (320x320 or better) color screen is
a fantastic improvement. Your eyes will thank you.

> I wonder if the latest Palms have transformers you can
>plug into the wall?

Get a model that comes without a cradle. My Tungsten E and Zire 72 are such
models. With these the charger cord plugs directly into the Palm. This set up
allows you to read while you charge (that is if your battery planning is that
poor... ;) 
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 3:55:41 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

AaronJ wrote:
> -=rjh=- <usually@mail.com> wrote:
>
>
>>AaronJ wrote:
>>
>>>-=rjh=- <usually@mail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>I'll have to replace the onboard [T3] battery eventually...
>>>
>>>
>>>Why put up with a bad battery when a new one is only $30?
>>>
>>>http://www.gethightech.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen...
>>
>>As I said, I'll replace it eventually, but in the meantime, there are
>>warranty issues to resolve.
>
>
> A T3 still under warranty? I didn't realize that was possible or I wouldn't have
> bothered with the suggestion. Sorry.

The unit has an extended warranty (3rd party, to 3 years) but I have to
resolve a couple of issues - is the battery covered? (I doubt it, but it
might be). If *I* replace the battery, is the unit still covered? (I
doubt it, too).

The PTG gives me a continuous running time of about 8.5 hours, so is
worthwhile in itself, aside from the T3 battery issues.

Some retailers here are still selling T3s new, as clearance products;
they are a good deal.
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 9:59:30 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

Al Smith wrote:
>>> Battery life is important to me, also. Right now I'm on
>>>
>>>> rechargeable AAA batteries... I wouldn't really want a built in
>>>> rechargeable battery that only lasts an hour and a half.
>>
>>
>>
>> Most modern Palms last around 4 hours unless you're doing some very
>> heavy stuff
>> that your AAA model likely couldn't handle anyway...
>
>
> Yes, but for me the trouble would be downtime. If I'm reading a novel
> (as I usually do on my Palm -- I seldom read paper books anymore) and
> I'm in the middle and the built-in battery runs out, I don't want to
> have to wait an hour or whatever until it charges up again. I wonder if
> the latest Palms have transformers you can plug into the wall? I must do
> some research on the Palm site.

If you are spending any significant time reading a Palm, you really
should upgrade to a later model - the difference in readability in
almost any lighting conditions is *huge*. And, having a 480x320 screen
doesn't hurt, either. I read a lot - mostly Plucker - and I just
couldn't go back to reading on a monochrome Palm now.

As far as charging options are concerned, there are many Palm1 and 3rd
party accessories available, I have 2 powered cradles, 1 mains charging
cable, 2 USB sync/charging cables - 1 of these has a automotive 12v->USB
adapter, and 2 PTG sleds. And an emergency charger, which is pretty well
useless. Have a look at http://www.expansys.com to get a good overview
of what is available.
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 12:33:43 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

>>Yes, but for me the trouble would be downtime. If I'm reading a
>>>novel (as I usually do on my Palm -- I seldom read paper books
>>>anymore)
>
>
> I've now logged over a 100 novels on the small screen. I'm also hooked.
>
>
>>>and I'm in the middle and the built-in battery runs out,
>>>I don't want to have to wait an hour or whatever until it charges
>>>up again.
>
>
> That would take pretty poor planning. If you leave the Palm on the charger
> overnight you will have a full charge in the morning. That's about 4 hours
> reading. I usually read about 2 hours a day so never even come close to a
> battery problem. BTW having read a large percentage of those novels on a mono
> screen I can tell you that a high resolution (320x320 or better) color screen is
> a fantastic improvement. Your eyes will thank you.
>

I often read longer than four hours at a stretch. If I'm into a
good novel, I might read eight or ten hours, but usually not more
than five or six hours a day. Two charges of my AAA batteries will
do a novel for me.

>
>>> I wonder if the latest Palms have transformers you can
>>>plug into the wall?
>
>
> Get a model that comes without a cradle. My Tungsten E and Zire 72 are such
> models. With these the charger cord plugs directly into the Palm. This set up
> allows you to read while you charge (that is if your battery planning is that
> poor... ;) 

I was on the palm site and checked out all the models. The Zires
seem the best since they don't have wireless, which I don't need.
If I can charge and read at the same time, that would work.
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 12:43:01 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

>> Yes, but for me the trouble would be downtime. If I'm reading a novel (as I usually do on my Palm -- I seldom read paper books anymore) and I'm in the middle and the built-in battery runs out, I don't want to have to wait an hour or whatever until it charges up again. I wonder if the latest Palms have transformers you can plug into the wall? I must do some research on the Palm site.
>
>
> If you are spending any significant time reading a Palm, you really should upgrade to a later model - the difference in readability in almost any lighting conditions is *huge*. And, having a 480x320 screen doesn't hurt, either. I read a lot - mostly Plucker - and I just couldn't go back to reading on a monochrome Palm now.

Reading without the backlight in some lighting conditions on the
Palm III is tough, I admit. I've got nothing against color,
either. Pretty. I'm sort of leaning toward the Zire 31. It has a
160X160 color screen, takes a standard stereo headphone plug
(which is good), and expansion cards. I don't really see a reason
to go up to the Zire 72, which is $170 US more money. I really
don't want a camera, wireless, and a sound recorder on my Palm. To
be honest, all I really want is a decent book reader.
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 2:18:32 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

Al Smith <invalid@address.com> wrote in
news:HS3ne.39941$Ph4.891023@ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca:

> I often read longer than four hours at a stretch. If I'm into a
> good novel, I might read eight or ten hours, but usually not more
> than five or six hours a day. Two charges of my AAA batteries will
> do a novel for me.

You can just plug the charge cable into whatever is handy - a computer,
AC, etc, and continue to read. I do that all the time with my T3 when
reading or playing games. Reading requires relatively little power,
since the CPU is just idling. Simply displaying characters doesn't take
much processor power.

> I was on the palm site and checked out all the models. The Zires
> seem the best since they don't have wireless, which I don't need.
> If I can charge and read at the same time, that would work.

I would recommend a Tungsten T|E rather than a Zire. The high-resolution
display is really worth it if you're going to be reading for hours at a
time. You'll be glad you paid a little more after you look at it for
long periods.

--
Regards,

Stan

"They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." B. Franklin
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 2:20:33 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

AaronJ <noemail@noemail.com> wrote in
news:e1kp91tecgib11tu563dqnmt2a9999oodd@4ax.com:

> Go for a Tungsten E.
> They're being discontinued and getting into the US$169 range.

I agree completely. 160x160 can be really tiring after hours of staring
at it. 320x320 makes a world of difference. A Zire 71 is nice, too, if
you find one.

--
Regards,

Stan

"They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." B. Franklin
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 5:21:30 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

>>I don't really see a reason to go up to the Zire 72,
>>>which is $170 US more money.
>
>
> Go for a Tungsten E.
> They're being discontinued and getting into the US$169 range.

I'll look into it.
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 5:22:59 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

>>I was on the palm site and checked out all the models. The Zires
>>> seem the best since they don't have wireless, which I don't need.
>>> If I can charge and read at the same time, that would work.
>
>
> I would recommend a Tungsten T|E rather than a Zire. The high-resolution
> display is really worth it if you're going to be reading for hours at a
> time. You'll be glad you paid a little more after you look at it for
> long periods.

Thanks for the comment. I'll check out the prices on the Tungsten
E around here.
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 9:00:04 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

Check into the battery rechargers for a Palm. There are different kinds but
they take either AA or 9Volts and will recharge the Palm when you're away
from a power source. You can use rechargeables too.

TC

"Al Smith" <invalid@address.com> wrote in message
news:T58ne.40111$Ph4.898698@ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca...
>>>I was on the palm site and checked out all the models. The Zires
>>>> seem the best since they don't have wireless, which I don't need. If I
>>>> can charge and read at the same time, that would work.
>>
>> I would recommend a Tungsten T|E rather than a Zire. The
>> high-resolution display is really worth it if you're going to be reading
>> for hours at a time. You'll be glad you paid a little more after you
>> look at it for long periods.
>
> Thanks for the comment. I'll check out the prices on the Tungsten E around
> here.
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 10:00:12 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

Tony Clark wrote:
> Check into the battery rechargers for a Palm. There are different kinds but
> they take either AA or 9Volts and will recharge the Palm when you're away
> from a power source. You can use rechargeables too.
>

Can anybody here clarify the position wrt to 9v emergency chargers?
AFAIK these devices are totally passive, and dump 9v directly into the
Palm device they are charging.

AFAIK VCHG on the Palm is specified as being 5.0v +- 5% (which seems a
little tight) but still way less than 9v. Are these emergency chargers safe?

4xNiMH cells should be fine; 4xalkalines will being getting a bit
excessive but probably acceptable. I guess.

The PTG sled gives the most integrated approach to backup power, and for
not much more expense, once you add the cost of 4 NiMH cells into the
equation. Plus, it will charge off the standard Palm chargers (not USB
cable, though, as they draw more than 500mA)
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 10:00:13 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

-=rjh=- <usually@mail.com> wrote:

>AFAIK these devices [9V chargers] are totally passive,
>and dump 9v directly into the Palm

The 9V chargers have a 5V regulator in them and are designed to give the Palm
the correct voltage.

>CHG on the Palm is specified as being 5.0v +- 5% (which seems a little tight)

Palms have overvoltage protection, I suppose to protect against the wrong wall
wart being used accidentally. I've measured the Tungsten E overvoltage at about
6.5V and the Zire 72 at about 6.0v. Up to those voltages there was normal
charging current. Exceed those voltages and the unit would take no current. Also
I dropped the charge voltage to 4.5V and still had charging current. So for
practical purposes that 5% seems to be able to be exceeded a bit.

>Are these emergency [9V] chargers safe?

If the regulator failed and put 9V into the Palm I'm not sure if the overvoltage
protection would work at that high a voltage or not. My *guess* is that it
*probably* would, and that it's *probably* pretty unlikely that the regulator
would fail, and even if it did it *probably* wouldn't put 9V into the Palm. Lots
of 'probably's though, huh... ;) 
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 4:37:35 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

"-=rjh=-" <usually@mail.com> wrote in message
news:429d4f17@news.orcon.net.nz...
> Tony Clark wrote:
>> Check into the battery rechargers for a Palm. There are different kinds
>> but they take either AA or 9Volts and will recharge the Palm when you're
>> away from a power source. You can use rechargeables too.
>>
>
SNIP

>
> The PTG sled gives the most integrated approach to backup power, and for
> not much more expense, once you add the cost of 4 NiMH cells into the
> equation. Plus, it will charge off the standard Palm chargers (not USB
> cable, though, as they draw more than 500mA)

As far as I know the PTG sleds have been discontinued. I cannot find anyone
selling them, except perhaps on ebay. The PTG is nice but is not as
convenient as readily available AA alkalines.

TC
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 4:41:26 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

AaronJ wrote:
> -=rjh=- <usually@mail.com> wrote:
>
>
>>AFAIK these devices [9V chargers] are totally passive,
>>and dump 9v directly into the Palm
>
>
> The 9V chargers have a 5V regulator in them and are designed to give the Palm
> the correct voltage.
>
>

You'd think so, but the one I have is definitely passive - no regulator
at all. For that reason, I'm really hesitant to use it with my T3;
still, it is one way of obtaining a niversal connector to play with :-)
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 4:41:27 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

-=rjh=- <usually@mail.com> wrote:

>[The 9V battery extender] I have is definitely passive -
> no regulator at all.

Weird. Never messed with a T3. Perhaps a different charging setup.

>For that reason, I'm really hesitant to use it with my T3;

Don't blame you. Is that extender actually *designed* for the T3?

>it is one way of obtaining a universal connector to play with :-)

For buying spare chargers *not* having a Universal Connector is a good thing.
Off the shelf cell phone chargers work fine for both my TungE and Zire72. So I
got my travel charger (US$9.99) and my car charger (US$14.95) at my local Target
store. Imagine what they would have cost if they had a Palm1 logo on them... ;) 
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 8:23:15 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

Toby <google@asktoby.com> wrote:

>The 'time' button doesn't work properly unless you press it in hard and
>wiggle it

I think this is the first I've heard a time (center?) button complaint. On my
Tungsten E the down button has always been hard to push. This was a common
complaint from the first batch. Newer ones worked ok.

>The speaker doesn't work any more

Another common complaint. You can fix this by taking it apart and bending the
speaker springs out so they make better contact with the board.

>The flip cover is coming off, torn at the edge

It can be cheaply replaced. Some of the more expensive models such as the Zire72
don't even come with a flip cover.

>The flip cover is missing the 'time' window of my m105

Easily remedied. (1) cut a hole in it. (2) Carry your m105 (3) get a watch... ;) 

>The screen wails at me and disturbs those around me

A common complaint here. There were a few reported fixes but I don't remember
what they were. Google might help.

>The headphone plug snapped and needed reparing

That sounds like an abuse problem. The Tungsten line is supposed to be a
business line and not designed for jogging as an mp3 player would be.

>The power button snapped and needed repairing

Another common complaint here. I avoid using the power button on mine (which is
easily done) so when do I have to have it (such as a hard reset) it will work.

>I can't recommend a T|E.

Fortunately I've had none of those problems. My TungE has been very reliable.
They are the best selling model so apparently millions of others think they're
ok also.

>I've had mine for a year now, and the hardware build quality is terrible.

This is the *cheapest* model high resolution color model made. If you really
want quality you can easily spend $500+ on a PDA. But I would still recommend
this unit (and guess I just did in the last post). Mine is approaching 2 years
old now and works fine. I'm sorry you've had problems though...
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 8:36:09 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

Tony Clark wrote:
> "-=rjh=-" <usually@mail.com> wrote in message
> news:429d4f17@news.orcon.net.nz...
>
>>Tony Clark wrote:
>>
>>>Check into the battery rechargers for a Palm. There are different kinds
>>>but they take either AA or 9Volts and will recharge the Palm when you're
>>>away from a power source. You can use rechargeables too.
>>>
>>
> SNIP
>
>
>>The PTG sled gives the most integrated approach to backup power, and for
>>not much more expense, once you add the cost of 4 NiMH cells into the
>>equation. Plus, it will charge off the standard Palm chargers (not USB
>>cable, though, as they draw more than 500mA)
>
>
> As far as I know the PTG sleds have been discontinued. I cannot find anyone
> selling them, except perhaps on ebay. The PTG is nice but is not as
> convenient as readily available AA alkalines.

Yes, I'm fairly sure PTGs have been discontinued, which is why I decided
to buy a couple while they are still available. In terms of convenience,
I prefer the PTG as when it is clipped to the Palm they become one unit,
you carry on using it as normal while charging - probably really useful
if you use wifi a lot. You aren't supposed to leave the PTG attached
longer than necessary as the Palm led drains both batteries and you
could lose data.

(BTW - does anybody know of an app that will switch the led off in this
situation?)

The downside is, you have to remove your Palm from most cases to use the
PTG, and you can't even use the original flip cover. The combined unit
will squeeze into a PalmGlove case, though.

A few weeks ago, expansys.com.hk claimed to have about 450 PTGs in
stock, but they don't have very many now. I have seen them on ebay, but
at higher than retail prices and with shipping issues (many vendors
won't ship overseas) I decided to buy from expansys. In retrospect, I'm
glad I did, as signs point toward these units becoming scarce for a
while, until secondhand ones come on the market as people upgrade their
Palms.

I expect the PalmOne wifi card will be discontinued soon as the next
generation of Palm will have wifi built in. Hopefully :-)
June 3, 2005 12:49:39 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

On 2005-06-02, AaronJ <noemail@noemail.com> wrote:
> Toby <google@asktoby.com> wrote:
>
>>The 'time' button doesn't work properly unless you press it in hard and
>>wiggle it
> I think this is the first I've heard a time (center?) button complaint. On my
> Tungsten E the down button has always been hard to push. This was a common
> complaint from the first batch. Newer ones worked ok.

Yes, the center button.

>>The speaker doesn't work any more
> Another common complaint. You can fix this by taking it apart and bending the
> speaker springs out so they make better contact with the board.

I have done this, twice! It's just a bad design - the constant jiggle of
being in a pocket means that the metal speaker spring has worn the metal
contact away. Next time I open my Palm, I am going to solder a short
wire between the two I think.

>>The screen wails at me and disturbs those around me
> A common complaint here. There were a few reported fixes but I don't remember
> what they were. Google might help.

There is a documented fix, but it is tricky, and not without risk. You
have to strip the screen right down, and put a layer of perspex like
material inside it. I haven't got the courage to do it,
yet.

>>The headphone plug snapped and needed reparing
> That sounds like an abuse problem. The Tungsten line is supposed to be a
> business line and not designed for jogging as an mp3 player would be.

The solder joint that held the jack socket in place was tiny - it took
very little force to snap it.

>>I've had mine for a year now, and the hardware build quality is terrible.
> This is the *cheapest* model high resolution color model made.

A fair point! Although my M105 survived daily use and many drop-tests :) 
and the only fault it suffered was the dead capacitor fault.

--
Toby.
Add the word afiduluminag to the subject
field to circumvent my email filters.
Ignore any mail delivery error.
Anonymous
June 3, 2005 12:55:27 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

Toby <google@asktoby.com> wrote:

>It's just a bad design - the constant jiggle of being in a pocket means
>that the metal speaker spring has worn the metal contact away.

I agree the press fit speaker springs in the TE is not a great design. It's
probably done to save on cost. But this spring contact design had worked in
several earlier models including your m105 with few problems.

>Although my M105 survived daily use and many drop-tests :) 

Surprised? Yes, your *reliable* m105 has spring contacts that connect the
battery box to the main board... ;) 

>The solder joint that held the jack socket in place was tiny - it took
>very little force to snap it.

That usually happens when the socket is stressed sideways as when an inserted
plug is forced sideways. It could be stress when in a pocket or when the unit is
dropped and lands against the inserted plug. As I said I don't think the TE was
meant to be a jogging mp3 player even though it can be used that way. However an
earlier model of a dedicated mp3 player (the Creative Zen Xtra jukebox) had this
same problem big time so you can never tell. The fix BTW was to reinforce the
socket internally with a silicone seal supported brace. Maybe you could try
something like that when you have the TE apart fixing the speaker.
Anonymous
June 5, 2005 8:09:48 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

Aaron Lake wrote:
> Al Smith <invalid@address.com> wrote:
>
>
>>Yes, but for me the trouble would be downtime. If I'm reading a
>>novel (as I usually do on my Palm -- I seldom read paper books
>>anymore)
>
>
> I've now logged over a 100 novels on the small screen. I'm also hooked.
>
>
>>and I'm in the middle and the built-in battery runs out,
>>I don't want to have to wait an hour or whatever until it charges
>>up again.
>
>
> That would take pretty poor planning. If you leave the Palm on the charger
> overnight you will have a full charge in the morning. That's about 4 hours
> reading. I usually read about 2 hours a day so never even come close to a
> battery problem. BTW having read a large percentage of those novels on a mono
> screen I can tell you that a high resolution (320x320 or better) color screen is
> a fantastic improvement. Your eyes will thank you.
>
>
>>I wonder if the latest Palms have transformers you can
>>plug into the wall?
>
>
> Get a model that comes without a cradle. My Tungsten E and Zire 72 are such
> models. With these the charger cord plugs directly into the Palm. This set up
> allows you to read while you charge (that is if your battery planning is that
> poor... ;) 

On a road trip, it was my turn away from the wheel, so I grabbed the
Palm. I did some reading while my TE was plugged into the cigarette
lighter. The lighter-charger and my other auxiliary power supply is a
battery pack. Neither came from Palm, but from ebay vendors. I was
worried about overcharging at first until I found out that Palm devices
protect themselves.
Anonymous
June 5, 2005 8:11:35 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

Stan Gosnell wrote:
> Al Smith <invalid@address.com> wrote in
> news:HS3ne.39941$Ph4.891023@ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca:
>
>
>>I often read longer than four hours at a stretch. If I'm into a
>>good novel, I might read eight or ten hours, but usually not more
>>than five or six hours a day. Two charges of my AAA batteries will
>>do a novel for me.
>
>
> You can just plug the charge cable into whatever is handy - a computer,
> AC, etc, and continue to read. I do that all the time with my T3 when
> reading or playing games. Reading requires relatively little power,
> since the CPU is just idling. Simply displaying characters doesn't take
> much processor power.
>
>
>>I was on the palm site and checked out all the models. The Zires
>>seem the best since they don't have wireless, which I don't need.
>>If I can charge and read at the same time, that would work.
>
>
> I would recommend a Tungsten T|E rather than a Zire. The high-resolution
> display is really worth it if you're going to be reading for hours at a
> time. You'll be glad you paid a little more after you look at it for
> long periods.
>
And indispensable while on the treadmill at the gym. (I think the guy on
the next machine was reading along.)
Anonymous
June 5, 2005 8:13:38 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

AaronJ wrote:
> -=rjh=- <usually@mail.com> wrote:
>
>
>>AFAIK these devices [9V chargers] are totally passive,
>>and dump 9v directly into the Palm
>
>
> The 9V chargers have a 5V regulator in them and are designed to give the Palm
> the correct voltage.
>
>
>>CHG on the Palm is specified as being 5.0v +- 5% (which seems a little tight)
>
>
> Palms have overvoltage protection, I suppose to protect against the wrong wall
> wart being used accidentally. I've measured the Tungsten E overvoltage at about
> 6.5V and the Zire 72 at about 6.0v. Up to those voltages there was normal
> charging current. Exceed those voltages and the unit would take no current. Also
> I dropped the charge voltage to 4.5V and still had charging current. So for
> practical purposes that 5% seems to be able to be exceeded a bit.
>
>
>>Are these emergency [9V] chargers safe?
>
>
> If the regulator failed and put 9V into the Palm I'm not sure if the overvoltage
> protection would work at that high a voltage or not. My *guess* is that it
> *probably* would, and that it's *probably* pretty unlikely that the regulator
> would fail, and even if it did it *probably* wouldn't put 9V into the Palm. Lots
> of 'probably's though, huh... ;) 

Mine still makes me nervous, and I watch it carefully. Also, the battery
gets hot. That makes me think that the Palm regulator is working, but
I'm just guessing.
Anonymous
June 5, 2005 8:16:13 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

Tony Clark wrote:
> "-=rjh=-" <usually@mail.com> wrote in message
> news:429d4f17@news.orcon.net.nz...
>
>>Tony Clark wrote:
>>
>>>Check into the battery rechargers for a Palm. There are different kinds
>>>but they take either AA or 9Volts and will recharge the Palm when you're
>>>away from a power source. You can use rechargeables too.
>>>
>>
> SNIP
>
>
>>The PTG sled gives the most integrated approach to backup power, and for
>>not much more expense, once you add the cost of 4 NiMH cells into the
>>equation. Plus, it will charge off the standard Palm chargers (not USB
>>cable, though, as they draw more than 500mA)
>
>
> As far as I know the PTG sleds have been discontinued. I cannot find anyone
> selling them, except perhaps on ebay. The PTG is nice but is not as
> convenient as readily available AA alkalines.
>
> TC
>

My search yielded them at Amazon.com, but I didn't check to see if they
were new or used. With other power supply options for my TE (and the
fact that the sled won't work on TE), I lost interest.
Anonymous
June 5, 2005 8:21:57 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

AaronJ wrote:
> Toby <google@asktoby.com> wrote:
>
>
>>The 'time' button doesn't work properly unless you press it in hard and
>>wiggle it
>
>
> I think this is the first I've heard a time (center?) button complaint. On my
> Tungsten E the down button has always been hard to push. This was a common
> complaint from the first batch. Newer ones worked ok.
>
>
>>The speaker doesn't work any more
>
>
> Another common complaint. You can fix this by taking it apart and bending the
> speaker springs out so they make better contact with the board.
>
>
>>The flip cover is coming off, torn at the edge
>
>
> It can be cheaply replaced. Some of the more expensive models such as the Zire72
> don't even come with a flip cover.
>
>
>>The flip cover is missing the 'time' window of my m105
>
>
> Easily remedied. (1) cut a hole in it. (2) Carry your m105 (3) get a watch... ;) 
>
>
>>The screen wails at me and disturbs those around me
>
>
> A common complaint here. There were a few reported fixes but I don't remember
> what they were. Google might help.
>
>
>>The headphone plug snapped and needed reparing
>
>
> That sounds like an abuse problem. The Tungsten line is supposed to be a
> business line and not designed for jogging as an mp3 player would be.
>
>
>>The power button snapped and needed repairing
>
>
> Another common complaint here. I avoid using the power button on mine (which is
> easily done) so when do I have to have it (such as a hard reset) it will work.
>
>
>>I can't recommend a T|E.
>
>
> Fortunately I've had none of those problems. My TungE has been very reliable.
> They are the best selling model so apparently millions of others think they're
> ok also.
>
>
>>I've had mine for a year now, and the hardware build quality is terrible.
>
>
> This is the *cheapest* model high resolution color model made. If you really
> want quality you can easily spend $500+ on a PDA. But I would still recommend
> this unit (and guess I just did in the last post). Mine is approaching 2 years
> old now and works fine. I'm sorry you've had problems though...

After seeing the remark that the TE is being discontinued and
discounted, I considered keeping an eye out for a great sale so I can
have a spare. Mine is about six months old. Yes, I have the loud screen,
but not to disturb anyone around me. My biggest complaint is VersaMail,
and that's simply a software disagreement.
Anonymous
June 5, 2005 8:24:50 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

AaronJ wrote:
> Toby <google@asktoby.com> wrote:
>
>
>>It's just a bad design - the constant jiggle of being in a pocket means
>>that the metal speaker spring has worn the metal contact away.
>
>
> I agree the press fit speaker springs in the TE is not a great design. It's
> probably done to save on cost. But this spring contact design had worked in
> several earlier models including your m105 with few problems.
>
>
>>Although my M105 survived daily use and many drop-tests :) 
>
>
> Surprised? Yes, your *reliable* m105 has spring contacts that connect the
> battery box to the main board... ;) 
>
>
>>The solder joint that held the jack socket in place was tiny - it took
>>very little force to snap it.
>
>
> That usually happens when the socket is stressed sideways as when an inserted
> plug is forced sideways. It could be stress when in a pocket or when the unit is
> dropped and lands against the inserted plug. As I said I don't think the TE was
> meant to be a jogging mp3 player even though it can be used that way. However an
> earlier model of a dedicated mp3 player (the Creative Zen Xtra jukebox) had this
> same problem big time so you can never tell. The fix BTW was to reinforce the
> socket internally with a silicone seal supported brace. Maybe you could try
> something like that when you have the TE apart fixing the speaker.

Could my good fortune so far be attributed to my use of a hardshell
case? It was a package deal.

BTW, I didn't like having the power and hotsync plugs covered up, so I
filed them away so I can close the unit and still charge it. No adverse
effects.
!