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Software Oc'ing my OEM PC?

So I've done a bit of upgrades to this OEM PC in the past 2 years, and I'm planning to overclock the CPU via software to give it a slight boost in performance. I'm not planning to do a major OC; 200Mhz or so more would be great. The PC is an Acer Aspire M1100- (M1100-1304A...to be exact).

I probably won't be making a new rig till late summer as I'm saving up for cash right now...might wait for a Phenom II 6-core, and the price of 5870's to go down a bit.

Here are my specs from CPU-Z and GPU-Z

CPU-Z:
- AMD Athlon 64 X2 4400+ (Brishane) Brand 4, AM2
coreV. 1.296, Family: F Model: B (6B), Stepping: 2, Rev: BH-G2
2.29Ghz (11.5 x 199.5) -STOCK-
HT Link: 997.4 Mhz

Mobo: Acer, F690GVM (RS690/RS690M) Rev:00
Southbridge: SB600
BIOS: Phoenix Technologies ltd
Ver: 6.00 PG
Date: 10/10/2007

Memory: 2 X 2GB DDR2 in dual channel (PC-6400 800MHz [Corsair XMS2])
DRAM frequency: 382.3Mhz
CAS# Latency (CL): 5
RAS# to CAS# delay: (tRCD): 5
RAS# orecharge (tRP): 5
Cycle Time (tRAS): 18
Bank Cycle Time (tRC): 23
Command Rate (CR): 2T

Timings Table (for the RAM):
JEDEC#1:
Freq: 270Mhz
Case Lat: 4
RAS# to CAS#: 4
RAS# Precharge: 4
tRAS: 13
tRC: 15

JEDEC #2:
400Mhz
5
5
5
18
22


GPU-Z:
Sapphire ATi Radeon HD 4850 512MB
Overclocked to: 700Mhz/1070Mhz
Release Date: Jun 19, 2008
BIOS version: VER011.003.000.000.029117

Hardware:
-Acer mobo...
- AMD Athlon 64 X2 4400+ @ stock
- 2 X 2GB of Corsair PC-6400 800Mhz RAM (they have heatsinks)
- 320GB hard drive
- Sapphire 4850 512MB
- SD/memory card reader
- Antec True Power Trio 430W
- 3 case fans

I've looked around the web and it seems some are getting decent OC's with their Acer M1100 (with X2 4000+'s) with the use of Clockgen, or SetFSB.

*Note do I have to lower the RAM frequency if I raise the FSB frequency?
Example: let's say I bring the FSB freq up 10MHz from OC, do I have to somehow lower the RAM frequency so it's around 800MHz...in my situation?

Sorry for this...long post, but I'd be really pleased to be able to OC my CPU to maybe 2.4..2.5..2.6 or even 2.7GHz from the stock 2.29GHz.

Thanks in advance!! :D
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  1. Best answer
    SetFSB or Clockgen will only work if it can read your pll. You should be able to overclock your FSB at least 23mhz no problem your ram is rated at 800mhz so it can handle a base clock of 400mhz with no problem at all and most likely you can go at least to 450mhz on the base clock without having RAM instability issues. From your cpu-z numbers it is only at 387mhz so you can go up 13mhz with out problem. There is no way you can change your RAM's frequency on a prebuilt system so dont even worry yourself with that.

    My suggestion is go up 20 mhz at a time and run Prime95 for atleast 30 minutes in between raises for stability once you become unstable it will either report a fatal error or you will get blue screen dont worry since this is normal for overclocking. Once you hit a clock speed that is unstable back it off til you can run Prime95 for at least 8 hours straight.

    Get Prime95 here
    http://files.extremeoverclocking.com/file.php?f=103

    Run the blend test each time you raise clock for 30 minutes an hour is better though.
  2. saaiello said:
    SetFSB or Clockgen will only work if it can read your pll. You should be able to overclock your FSB at least 23mhz no problem your ram is rated at 800mhz so it can handle a base clock of 400mhz with no problem at all and most likely you can go at least to 450mhz on the base clock without having RAM instability issues. From your cpu-z numbers it is only at 387mhz so you can go up 13mhz with out problem. There is no way you can change your RAM's frequency on a prebuilt system so dont even worry yourself with that.

    My suggestion is go up 20 mhz at a time and run Prime95 for atleast 30 minutes in between raises for stability once you become unstable it will either report a fatal error or you will get blue screen dont worry since this is normal for overclocking. Once you hit a clock speed that is unstable back it off til you can run Prime95 for at least 8 hours straight.

    Get Prime95 here
    http://files.extremeoverclocking.com/file.php?f=103

    Run the blend test each time you raise clock for 30 minutes an hour is better though.


    Alright! I got it to 2404Mhz stable so far.
    The highest temperature it's ever got was 51-52 C @ 100% full load. Is that a little high, or is it okay...and I can bring it up maybe to 55C?
    60C might be pushing it a bit i think...
  3. 60 C is a safe temperature. Remember, these are temps at 100% loads.You will not be operation at 100% load for sustained periods.
  4. Actually, at stock settings your system was slightly under-clocked. 2400mhz cpu and 800mhz memory would be nominal settings. I think you might be able to get it even higher than 2404. Be aware though, there are risks with over-clocking! You might end up having to do a Windows reinstall if your system crashes (or worse!). A much safer route would be to replace the cpu with a faster one like the low power 5600 Brisbane that New egg was selling for less than $60. (I just checked and it is currently out of stock.)
  5. People told me to keep the HT Link at 1000 Mhz or lower...and mine's currently at 1045 mhz. How does having the HT link higher then 1000 mhz affect the overclock? CPU?

    Others say AM2's can run up to atleast 1250 mhz.

    I need some help with this... :??:
  6. I tend to start seeing issues with the HT link at around 1070 to 1080. I've yet to get one over that. On an OEM system that you can't adjust the HT speed (via the 5x/4x/etc setting) you'll probably hit that wall well before you hit the processors limit on stock voltage (which you probably can't adjust via software either...though I could be wrong).
  7. dkapke said:
    I tend to start seeing issues with the HT link at around 1070 to 1080. I've yet to get one over that. On an OEM system that you can't adjust the HT speed (via the 5x/4x/etc setting) you'll probably hit that wall well before you hit the processors limit on stock voltage (which you probably can't adjust via software either...though I could be wrong).


    Well I'm using setFSB and when I OC the core-voltage also increases...atleast it says on CPU-Z. At stock its around 1.29v, and when its at 2404Mhz it goes up a little to 1.33v ish.

    Yeah i cant adjust the HT speed which kinda sucks (the board suck in general lol).

    My RAM is slightly over 800Mhz...will it cause RAM issues if i bring it up higher?
    *I have Corsair XMS2 DDR2 PC-6400 800Mhz RAM sticks...and there were running at around 780mhz before i did the overclocking...if it helps*

    Anyways, I'm gonna try and see if i can get the CPU to 2500 mhz...or even 2600 mhz (running like a 5000+ would be pretty nice :wahoo: )

    I might exchange my 80mm side fan for a 120mm...and a slim chance that ill spend $40 for a thermaltake tower heatsink (on a 64 X2).
  8. I don't think setFSB is what's handling the overvoltage. What you're probably seeing is simply processor volting up as it needs it. It's default voltage was 1.35v.

    XMS2 is pretty good memory, but even with that I doubt you'll be able to get much higher than 825-835 since you can't overvolt it. Maybe 840. I suspect the most you can get out of it via a software overclock is about 2.5 to 2.55. At that point, you'll start running into too much OC on the HT link and not enough voltage to keep the processor or memory happy.

    Do NOT spend anymore money on a heatsink or an extra fan - it won't do you any good and you'll be out $50 - $50 that could buy you an x2 240. With another $50 you can buy a cheap 770 chipset mATX motherboard (that will fit in your case) and use your existing ram and you'd have a PC that would blow away what you have now. Well, okay, not blow away, but it would be quite a bit faster and have much over flexibility in what you can do with it. I've upgraded Acer (and Compaq and HP) mATX boards several times with well known, overclock friendly boards fairly easily. I've got an x2 240 OC'd to 3.5GHz listed on eBay right now with a Hyper 212+ cooler. Cost me $140 with a combo discount and the 212+, and I can promise it's about twice as fast as your 4400+. It just doesn't make sense to put a high-end cooler on a processor that you can't really overclock all that well as you'll never get it hot enough to justify the cost.

    Just my 2¢. :D
  9. dkapke said:
    I don't think setFSB is what's handling the overvoltage. What you're probably seeing is simply processor volting up as it needs it. It's default voltage was 1.35v.

    XMS2 is pretty good memory, but even with that I doubt you'll be able to get much higher than 825-835 since you can't overvolt it. Maybe 840. I suspect the most you can get out of it via a software overclock is about 2.5 to 2.55. At that point, you'll start running into too much OC on the HT link and not enough voltage to keep the processor or memory happy.

    Do NOT spend anymore money on a heatsink or an extra fan - it won't do you any good and you'll be out $50 - $50 that could buy you an x2 240. With another $50 you can buy a cheap 770 chipset mATX motherboard (that will fit in your case) and use your existing ram and you'd have a PC that would blow away what you have now. Well, okay, not blow away, but it would be quite a bit faster and have much over flexibility in what you can do with it. I've upgraded Acer (and Compaq and HP) mATX boards several times with well known, overclock friendly boards fairly easily. I've got an x2 240 OC'd to 3.5GHz listed on eBay right now with a Hyper 212+ cooler. Cost me $140 with a combo discount and the 212+, and I can promise it's about twice as fast as your 4400+. It just doesn't make sense to put a high-end cooler on a processor that you can't really overclock all that well as you'll never get it hot enough to justify the cost.

    Just my 2¢. :D


    Yeah, thought buying another CPU cooler would not be worth it. But the fan upgrade might be useful though since the 80mm fan i have run now is blowing directly at my single slot 4850 (stock design :??: ) My CPU cooler sucks in cool air from the side panel, so I thought having a 120mm fan blow in, and moving the 80mm above the CPU heatsink will improve overall airflow.

    I currently have one 80mm fan at the front of the case (blowing thru my 4850, and out the back of my case), one 80mm for exhaust (top-left of case), 80mm side panel intake...and a 120mm fan from PSU that suck air in and out the back.
  10. You could certainly try it - it isn't like case fans are expensive. I just don't think you're going to get the 4400+ to a point where heat becomes an issue when you're only using a software overclock. You'll exceed memory or HT link speeds and not boot well before you reach any temperature issues.
  11. Best answer selected by vic_.
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