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Can my motherboard handle 4-4-4-12 CAS Latency?

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  • Motherboards
  • Overclocking
  • RAM
  • Computer
Last response: in Motherboards
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April 1, 2009 6:49:07 PM

Hello. I was wondering if my motherboard can run pc2-6400 4-4-4-12 RAM?

This is the RAM.
http://newgskill.web-bi.net/bbs/view.php?id=g_ddr2&page...

It comes defaulted at 5-5-5-15 and I am running my computer on them now, but I wan't to overclock them to the 4-4-4-12 CL speed they are designed to run at...
My BIOS doesn't give me the "Advanced Chipset" option, so I was talking with HP support about how to overclock my RAM and I was told my computer isn't capable of running at that speed. I think they are wrong and just wanted other peoples opinions.

I have a HP Pavillion a6200n. Here is link to my computer information.
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01...

Also any information on how I can overclock my RAM would be awsome also... My BIOS only gives me my computer information and my RAM information is greyed out.

Any help or opinions would be greatly appreciated...

Thanks in advance.

More about : motherboard handle cas latency

a b V Motherboard
April 1, 2009 9:10:55 PM

Quote:
My BIOS doesn't give me the "Advanced Chipset" option, so I was talking with HP support about how to overclock my RAM


So, you have no control over any potential Ocing options from the BIOS HP has supplied the system with.

Quote:
My BIOS only gives me my computer information and my RAM information is greyed out.


So, there is no way to adjust the CAS latency timings.


Since your G. Skill PC26400 is rated at 4-4-4-12, you might try this program to set the timings. You have no adjustmet on the RAM voltage, so that may be a problem getting a stable 4-4-4-12 timings. You will probably crash and burn, but what the hey, your're asking. :lol:  Adjusting the RAM timings is not overclocking the RAM in the pure sense. You would need to adjust the speed, or data transfer rate to OC the RAM.

http://www.tweakers.fr/memset.html





April 1, 2009 10:19:30 PM

Thanks for the help. I read that I could change my CMOS battery on my motherboard and that might allow me to set the timings. I am kinda a nub at this stuff, so IDK if that would work and even if it did I wouldn't wanna mess up my motherboard if it cannot handle the CAS latency speed my RAM is suppose to be at.

Thx for the link. Is there anyway to check what voltage my RAM is currently running at?

If I use the memset, what type of things could happen to my computer? lol I wouldn't want it to crash and not be able to load back up because it cannot support the timings. Since I can't change the timings from my BIOS I wouldn't be able to run my comp at all right? Wouldn't want something to fry either... lol idk like i said I'm a nub at this stuff.
a b V Motherboard
April 1, 2009 11:06:56 PM

Quote:
I read that I could change my CMOS battery on my motherboard and that might allow me to set the timings.


Nope. Removing or changing the battery will reset the system BIOS to default values.

Quote:
I am kinda a nub at this stuff, so IDK if that would work and even if it did I wouldn't wanna mess up my motherboard if it cannot handle the CAS latency speed my RAM is suppose to be at.


Actually the RAM Mfg. has a set of specifications incuding the timings, voltage and speed the RAM is rated at. Your MB has nothing to do with what the RAM Mfg. specs require other than to provide a BIOS that would allow adjustments for the speed, timings and voltage of any RAM used in the system. Your HP does not provide a BIOS capable of adjusting the RAM. probably due to a warranty constraint that came with the system when you bought it from HP.


Quote:
Is there anyway to check what voltage my RAM is currently running at?


The voltage applied to the RAM is normally monitored as well as adjusted by the system BIOS. Mfg.'s like ASUS and Gigabyte have a full array of enthusiast OCing features in their premium MBs.

Quote:
If I use the memset, what type of things could happen to my computer?


The CAS latency timings could be changed. The system could lock up and you would have to remove the battery and reset the CMOS jumper to default the BIOS and get back to desktop. HP would probably say something like, "you just voided your warranty, we will make a note and contact a supervisor at Level 22." My wife is at level 22 BTW. :lol:  :lol: 

Quote:
lol I wouldn't want it to crash and not be able to load back up because it cannot support the timings. Since I can't change the timings from my BIOS I wouldn't be able to run my comp at all right? Wouldn't want something to fry either... lol idk like i said I'm a nub at this stuff.


Adjusting the timings will not 'fry' anything. Messing with the voltage may.

!