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December 24, 2008 2:02:46 AM

(If this has already been attended to in another thread, please inform me.)

I believe that for X-mas, one of my relatives will get me a 9800 GT, which, while being a good card, is a bit low for my upgrading quota. I've settled on having my rig getting an EVGA GTX 260 or Sapphire HD4870 by '09, but this relative throws a wrench into the works. I've told him that if he is getting me a GT, I'd like it to be EVGA, so I can step-up to the 260, but the more I read about it, the more I like the 4870.

The idea is for me to be able to future-proof my computer for a bit with a high-end card, and the GT probably won't for as long as I want. The question itself is: do I want to step-up to a GTX 260, or RMA it for a 4870.

I'm also wondering if either option would make me look like a dick to my relative.

More about : resolved

December 24, 2008 2:04:38 AM

Getting rid of it will probably come with some relative backlash.

Anyways, if you have an SLi board you can just get another GT. Two of them beat a GTX 260 anyways.
December 24, 2008 2:07:45 AM

Alright, I know this must be said somewhere else, but what can I do to figure out if my Rig can support SLI? Does Nvidia have a scanner for it?

Any ballpark about how much better two GTs are vs. a 260? Because I don't really want to mess with SLI if I don't have to.
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December 24, 2008 2:28:54 AM

Whats your motherboard?

As far as the differences go, I think a 8800GT/9800GT SLi setup actually beats even a GTX 280, youll have to look up some benches as im not entirely sure. Now as far as SLi itself goes, I feel you on not wanting to deal with it, a single card solution is always the best way to go, simple, easy, dont have to worry about compatibility issues or your PSU being too weak...it was just a susgestion that would lead you to not having to ditch that 9800GT
a c 123 U Graphics card
December 24, 2008 2:39:42 AM

sli or no sli, 2 - 256bit memory interfaces don't equal 512......... I have a 4870/512 card and UPGRADED to a GTX260 oc card. That's the way to go.
December 24, 2008 2:41:45 AM

Not entirely sure what it is, but it's still the stock one from dell. I CPU-Zed it, but I'm not getting anything conclusive.

Wow, I knew that SLI was pretty badass, but I didn't figure it was that powerful. I'll definitely take it into consideration, but I'm not 100% sure I'd like to deal with all the possible expenses, and fiddle-ness.

Still a bit curious about the 260 vs. 4870 thing. Both will work, I mean, I really want to future-proof my rig for while (19 in. monitor FTW). I know that the 4870 has better overclocking capability, but I'm nice and comfortable with the Nvidia control panel and such.
December 24, 2008 2:53:20 AM

two 9800GT's will absolutely rape a 260 if that's what you are asking. like two 4830's in crossfire... obviously they are going to own any single GPU...
December 24, 2008 2:59:44 AM

What I'm asking is the age old question: GTX 260 or 4870. The catch is I can step-up to a 260, or RMA the GT for the cash to get a 4870. The 260 would probably be easier to do (my rig is currently Nvidia), but the 4870 has better overclocking.
December 24, 2008 3:09:09 AM

EVGA now has the 55nm version of GTX 260 Core 216 available through the step up program. Should overclock like mad.
December 24, 2008 3:12:47 AM

Step up. New GTX 260 216 is competitive in its price bracket.
December 24, 2008 3:14:48 AM

Alright. I was already leaning toward the GTX, I just needed other peoples opinions to make sure my research was correct.
December 24, 2008 6:31:00 AM

Kommee said:
Not entirely sure what it is, but it's still the stock one from dell. I CPU-Zed it, but I'm not getting anything conclusive..


If you have a Dell, you most likely don't have an SLI board. One way of doing dual GPU with only one PCIe is with a dual GPU card. I went that route ten months ago. The 4870x2 is powerful, as is the upcoming GTX295 Nvidia card. The ATI card has two GPU's on one PCB and the Nvidia card has 2 PCB's together operating as one card. I doubt that you'll have a power supply that supports it if you have a Dell.


Kommee said:

Wow, I knew that SLI was pretty badass, but I didn't figure it was that powerful. I'll definitely take it into consideration, but I'm not 100% sure I'd like to deal with all the possible expenses, and fiddle-ness..


The drawback with both Crossfire and SLI is that a game has to support it. I only get the benefits of two 3870 GPU's in some games, and in others it's just one GPU supported. Driver issues can wreak havok with both Crossfire and SLI. So, they're powerful, but not perfect.

Kommee said:

Still a bit curious about the 260 vs. 4870 thing. Both will work, I mean, I really want to future-proof my rig for while (19 in. monitor FTW). I know that the 4870 has better overclocking capability, but I'm nice and comfortable with the Nvidia control panel and such.


I'd get a 4870 over a GTX260, but I'm biased in liking a total AMD platform. The more recent GTX260 is actually a good card and beats a 4870 by a smidgen, depending on the game.

Can you give us information on your power supply? You'll probably have to open the case and read the information off the PSU. What's really important with GTX260 and 4870 class cards is how many amps are supported on your 12 volt rails. Some PSU's have multiple rails and others have only one. If you need to contact Dell about your model, then do it. Using a card that requires more amps than the 12 volt rail of the PSU can supply will end up causing problems like BSOD's.
December 24, 2008 7:53:31 AM

LOOK. on their own, performance wise YOU WILL NOT SEE A DIFFERENCE. can you tell 30 fps from 31? i cant.

if you are rootin for the stepup, get the 260. if you have an nvidia board, get the 260.

if you don't want the stepup/want to crossfire the 4870 later, get an intel board.
a c 123 U Graphics card
December 24, 2008 12:52:49 PM

One, even though this is for the i7 processor and associated hardware, it will show you a good example of how some cards work at different resolutions and settings.

http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/2008/12/17/xmas-2008-g...


Two, the last poster said something to the effect of noticing the difference between 30 and 31 fps. I don't look at it that way. I own these two cards and there is a noticeable difference in how games play and at what settings between the two cards. Stuff that equal fps garbage. And when you shop for a card you have to take into account what games you are going to play, and for me, what the minimum fps are. That's where the difference is going to lie.

As far as over clocking goes, it's hit or miss. Some do and do it well.... ( just a few extra fps vs stressing the card don't make much sense to me ) some fall flat and cause more problems than it's worth. You toss away your warranty and might do damage if you're not careful. Over clocking your processor will do more for the performance of your system than over clocking the video card.

!