Can you imagine.....?

Archived from groups: alt.games.the-sims (More info?)

I found this article on the BBC (uk) news pages today.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/4182023.stm
"God games in which players must control virtual people and societies could
be educational, says research.
A US researcher has suggested that games such as The Sims could be a good
way to teach languages.

Ravi Purushotma believes that the world of The Sims can do a better job of
teaching vocabulary and grammar than traditional
methods........................"


Considering some of the things that people in this group do with their Sims,
I think some of the language could be quite interesting. ;-))

Skeatsan''co
12 answers Last reply
More about imagine
  1. Archived from groups: alt.games.the-sims (More info?)

    "Skeatsan''co" <overthemoon@overthemoonagain.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:oPbHd.13097$GG1.2632@text.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    >I found this article on the BBC (uk) news pages today.
    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/4182023.stm
    > "God games in which players must control virtual people and societies
    > could be educational, says research.
    > A US researcher has suggested that games such as The Sims could be a good
    > way to teach languages.
    >
    > Ravi Purushotma believes that the world of The Sims can do a better job of
    > teaching vocabulary and grammar than traditional
    > methods........................"
    >
    >
    >
    > Considering some of the things that people in this group do with their
    > Sims, I think some of the language could be quite interesting. ;-))
    >
    > Skeatsan''co
    >

    BTW Mr Ravi Purushotma's paper about using the Sims is at ...........
    http://llt.msu.edu/vol9num1/purushotma/default.html

    Skeatsan''co
  2. Archived from groups: alt.games.the-sims (More info?)

    "Skeatsan''co" <overthemoon@overthemoonagain.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:oPbHd.13097$GG1.2632@text.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
    >I found this article on the BBC (uk) news pages today.
    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/4182023.stm
    > "God games in which players must control virtual people and societies
    > could be educational, says research.
    > A US researcher has suggested that games such as The Sims could be a good
    > way to teach languages.
    >
    > Ravi Purushotma believes that the world of The Sims can do a better job of
    > teaching vocabulary and grammar than traditional
    > methods........................"
    >
    >
    >
    > Considering some of the things that people in this group do with their
    > Sims, I think some of the language could be quite interesting. ;-))
    >
    > Skeatsan''co
    >
    >

    As funny as it sounds, my 9 year old son's psychologist recommended it for
    him! My boy has passive autism ~ which presents quite differently to
    atypicial autism or aspergers syndrome. He appears completely normal, has
    no oddities or in your face differences. He even 'passively' approaches
    obsessive behaviour, weird I know! However, he is still on the retarded
    level in social situations and that is why the doc suggested the sims. He
    claims that it helps to teach these kids how to interact as well as all the
    other basic needs that keeps you in the green! Funny thing is, my other 2
    kids love sims and he can take it or leave it :)

    ~ jo

    http://thesims2.ea.com/mysimpage/mysimpage.php?user_id=223269
  3. Archived from groups: alt.games.the-sims (More info?)

    Skeatsan''co waved a magic wand at the 'puter, changed into a moose
    (OOPS!) - tried again and came up with:
    > I found this article on the BBC (uk) news pages today.
    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/4182023.stm
    > "God games in which players must control virtual people and societies
    > could be educational, says research.
    > A US researcher has suggested that games such as The Sims could be a
    > good way to teach languages.
    >
    > Ravi Purushotma believes that the world of The Sims can do a better
    > job of teaching vocabulary and grammar than traditional
    > methods........................"

    Comas Nala? Dis graw is fredashay! Hootin Burwatty! Hootin Burwatty!

    Dag dag,

    --
    --- Mike --- http://www.livin-it-up.net
    Member of eKoOK (evil Kult of Object Kreators)
    "The ultimate goal is load time of 24 hours!"
    "The ultimate goal is filling every hard drive in the world!"
    Mwahahaha!
  4. Archived from groups: alt.games.the-sims (More info?)

    "hangover_girl" <hangovergirl@dodo.com.au> wrote in message >>

    > As funny as it sounds, my 9 year old son's psychologist recommended it for
    > him! My boy has passive autism ~ which presents quite differently to
    > atypicial autism or aspergers syndrome. He appears completely normal, has
    > no oddities or in your face differences. He even 'passively' approaches
    > obsessive behaviour, weird I know! However, he is still on the retarded
    > level in social situations and that is why the doc suggested the sims. He
    > claims that it helps to teach these kids how to interact as well as all
    > the other basic needs that keeps you in the green! Funny thing is, my
    > other 2 kids love sims and he can take it or leave it :)

    I am 27 and I have high functioning autism. I recently learned about the 3
    categories of autism and wonder if mine is also passive. Can you tell me
    more about that type or have any links discussing it?

    At one point, I realized that playing The Sims has actually helped me
    socially in some major ways. The fact that they have the pluses and minuses
    above their heads after conversations and interactions has taught me *how*
    to think about other people's feelings about my behavior. Being literal, I
    always think about whether my behavior caused a plus or minus above
    someone's head. It has really helped me guide my behavior and what I will
    say (such as whether being honest would be more harmful than helpful).

    Playing it has also showed me that being too forward (in the sims it would
    mean advanced kissing or teasing before warm up interactions) such as asking
    a personal question without small talk first will cause them to have a minus
    above their head, yet they may still interact with me anyway even though
    their mood is lowered. I have learned *how* to imagine what way my behavior
    affected them, even though they may not directly show me or tell me they
    have been affected.

    Fawnhawk
  5. Archived from groups: alt.games.the-sims (More info?)

    "Fawnhawk" wrote in message
    >
    > I am 27 and I have high functioning autism. I recently learned about the
    > 3 categories of autism and wonder if mine is also passive. Can you tell
    > me more about that type or have any links discussing it?
    >
    > At one point, I realized that playing The Sims has actually helped me
    > socially in some major ways. The fact that they have the pluses and
    > minuses above their heads after conversations and interactions has taught
    > me *how* to think about other people's feelings about my behavior. Being
    > literal, I always think about whether my behavior caused a plus or minus
    > above someone's head. It has really helped me guide my behavior and what
    > I will say (such as whether being honest would be more harmful than
    > helpful).
    >
    > Playing it has also showed me that being too forward (in the sims it would
    > mean advanced kissing or teasing before warm up interactions) such as
    > asking a personal question without small talk first will cause them to
    > have a minus above their head, yet they may still interact with me anyway
    > even though their mood is lowered. I have learned *how* to imagine what
    > way my behavior affected them, even though they may not directly show me
    > or tell me they have been affected.
    >
    > Fawnhawk
    >

    Wow thanks for that, it's helped me understand how exactly the social
    interactions part could help Hunter out :)

    My take on Passive Autism (which Hunter's specialist said only accounts for
    3% of all diagnosed on the ASD), is that it has both good and bad
    repercussions.

    It's fantastic that Hunter can appear totally normal, no one ever suspects
    that there is anything wrong with him until they have known him for a number
    of months. Subsequently, the bullying that these kids often endure,
    generally by passes him ~ for a while at least.

    The negative side of it is for the very same reasons. People's expectations
    of him are much higher. People, including teachers, have a hard time
    *remembering* that this is a little boy who doesn't function like everyone
    else.

    If he was in the classroom all day then I think his life would be hunky
    dory. He's fine in one on one's and even in groups of 3 or 4. He is able
    to make friends, although they are never the most popular kids. It's once
    he's in that jungle of a playground that his life gets tough :( He doesn't
    understand the social nuances and has a hard time understanding the rules
    kids tend to make up in their games. And as like a lot of kids on the
    autism scale, will lash out violently when his lack of ability to understand
    pushes him into a panic attack scenario. It's really sad. Here in
    Australia we don't have funding for kids with autism unless they are really
    low on the scale. They need to be *mentally* deficient or have a physical
    disability in order to be recognised within the school system. And as you
    will know, these people are among the smartest of them all. It's so not
    fair. I often question how a child who may have a slight physical
    disability, but who can play happily and without problem along side an able
    bodied child, qualifies for an aid in the playground, but my child who is
    socially retarded is supposed to fend for himself. It saddens me....

    Apparently Bill Gates fits into the passive autism subgroup...so it's not
    all bad news :)

    Feel free to contact me privately if you want :)

    jo
  6. Archived from groups: alt.games.the-sims (More info?)

    Fawnhawk wrote:

    > I am 27 and I have high functioning autism. I recently
    > learned about the 3 categories of autism and wonder if
    > mine is also passive. Can you tell me more about that
    > type or have any links discussing it?

    This is fascinating. Do you mind if I ask some questions? Well,
    I'll ask anyway and feel free to not answer them :-)

    > Being literal, I always think about whether my behavior
    > caused a plus or minus above someone's head. It has
    > really helped me guide my behavior and what I will say
    > (such as whether being honest would be more harmful than
    > helpful).

    But how do you know in advance whether it will be a plus or a
    minus?

    > I have learned *how* to imagine what way my behavior affected
    them, even
    > though they may not directly show me or tell me they have
    > been affected.

    Which is what empathic people do automatically, of course. A neat
    trick, I must say. But how does it work? Does it remind you to
    imagine their reactions or something?

    T (unsatiable curious).
  7. Archived from groups: alt.games.the-sims (More info?)

    "Taemon" <Taemon@zonnet.nl> wrote in message
    news:35cnfrF4l37rdU1@individual.net...
    > Fawnhawk wrote:

    >> Being literal, I always think about whether my behavior
    >> caused a plus or minus above someone's head. It has
    >> really helped me guide my behavior and what I will say
    >> (such as whether being honest would be more harmful than
    >> helpful).
    >
    > But how do you know in advance whether it will be a plus or a
    > minus?

    My mom and I would discuss how my behavior affected her after I did
    something undesirable, but it never really sunk in because I had no literal
    key to relate it to, no guide I could follow. Once I obtained these visual
    cues, the puzzle of it all came together instantly.

    I am learning to recognize that there is a combined energy or mood when two
    or more people are together in a room. It is not just my mood or just the
    other person's mood. This awareness probably also came about from playing
    The Sims and seeing how they behaved when other people did things in the
    room. Now that is even more helpful with The Sims 2, having the sims be
    aware of things happening around them.

    I am aware that if I say something (usually a fact such as correcting
    someone or a truth about something) that will affect their mood as well as
    the overall combined mood. The really difficult part that I didn't realize
    was that while their personal mood might go back to normal, the combined
    mood will stay lower because of the undesired behavior I did.

    Depending on what I say or do and how strong it was, that combined mood can
    stay lower for hours, days or months, so I am learning to *see* what it is I
    did to this mood and how I can fix it. Using the pluses and minuses as a
    visual and literal guide helps me see what is going on better. I have also
    had the mood bar display in my mind (about the other person) while I was
    doing something undesireable and watch it go down from green to red. It is
    amusing to me that I can now understand what I am doing by these visual
    cues. I will never see how I affect people by looking their nonverbal
    behavior (because I can't integrate the behavior that I observe and have it
    mean something useful to me), so these visual cues are a good substitute.

    I don't know in advance what will happen, so I still end up saying or doing
    things that are undesireable, but afterwards I recognize what I did and can
    fix it and not do it as much. An example is that I used to be rigid about
    people picking me up right at the time they said they would. There is
    absolutely no reason to be late unless something unexpected happens. When
    my mom would be late and I would get into the car, I would be upset and ask
    her why she was late and discuss why I needed her to be on time and why she
    saw it as unimportant to be on time. This lowered the combined mood, even
    though it is something important to me.

    Eventually, I realized that the focus of my being with her, was to enjoy our
    time together and just be together. When I saw that and saw (using the
    pluses and minuses) what I was doing to it by being rigid, I stopped acting
    rigid about the time. I also realized that life isn't about being so rigid,
    life changes. Since my focus is on being with her and not the time, I was
    able to see past her being late and get into the car with a good mood
    instead of an upset one. I will still prefer people be on time (my mind is
    still rigid about it), but if they are only a couple minutes late, I don't
    need to say anything (behavior is not rigid)because I understand that the
    mood is more important; I am more socially aware in that aspect.

    What is difficult is that while people might think I am now acting more
    normal, I am only compensating by using my intellect and visual cues. I
    will still have the literal thoughts about people's behavior and confusion
    and feelings about those behaviors, but now understand why not to say
    anything. So I am not less autistic, I just compensate and behave better.


    >> I have learned *how* to imagine what way my behavior affected
    >> them, even though they may not directly show me or tell me they have
    >> been affected.
    >
    > Which is what empathic people do automatically, of course. A neat
    > trick, I must say. But how does it work? Does it remind you to
    > imagine their reactions or something?

    By seeing the plus, it tells me they are likely enjoying themselves (just
    like in the sims) and the minus tells me they are likely negatively affected
    by my behavior and thus unhappy or uncomfortable. The signs help me put the
    situation into a organized pattern that I can understand. The mood bar
    display is a pattern I can understand and respond to. A frown, folded arms,
    turning away, etc is not a pattern I can understand and so I can't respond
    appropriately to it.

    I basically have to learn what behaviors will coincide with the pluses and
    minuses. Yelling usually would cause a minus sign, acting rigidly causes a
    minus sign, saying "you look beautiful" to my mom causes a plus sign, etc.
    I learned to compliment my mother sometimes, using this pattern, which is
    great. I don't understand compliments, but I understand the pattern.
    Again, I may appear to be acting more normal, when I am just compensating by
    using my intellect and the patterns I created and understand.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.games.the-sims (More info?)

    This would make a much better article
    if some journalist is reading this...

    I mean it's more interesting than the
    corrupt hacks...at least in my opinion!

    ;)

    --
    - D

    "Fawnhawk" <fawnhawk4375@no.earthlink.net> wrote in message
    news:Q9bId.1762$YD5.1658@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    >
    > "Taemon" <Taemon@zonnet.nl> wrote in message
    > news:35cnfrF4l37rdU1@individual.net...
    >> Fawnhawk wrote:
  9. Archived from groups: alt.games.the-sims (More info?)

    Fawnhawk wrote:

    > "Taemon" <Taemon@zonnet.nl> wrote in message
    > news:35cnfrF4l37rdU1@individual.net...
    > > Fawnhawk wrote:
    > > > Being literal, I always think about whether my
    > > > behavior caused a plus or minus above someone's head. It
    has
    > > > really helped me guide my behavior and what I will say
    > > > (such as whether being honest would be more harmful
    > > > than helpful).
    > > But how do you know in advance whether it will be a
    > > plus or a minus?
    <snip>
    > I am learning to recognize that there is a combined
    > energy or mood when two or more people are together in a
    > room. It is not just my mood or just the other person's
    > mood. This awareness probably also came about from
    > playing The Sims and seeing how they behaved when other
    > people did things in the room.

    Is this what in the game would be the relationship score?

    > So I am not less autistic, I
    > just compensate and behave better.

    Fascinating. I don't have much to say about it, expect thanks for
    sharing. Is non-verbal communication like this easier for you?

    T.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.games.the-sims (More info?)

    Skeatsan''co wrote:
    > I found this article on the BBC (uk) news pages today.
    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/4182023.stm
    > "God games in which players must control virtual people and societies could
    > be educational, says research.
    > A US researcher has suggested that games such as The Sims could be a good
    > way to teach languages.
    >
    > Ravi Purushotma believes that the world of The Sims can do a better job of
    > teaching vocabulary and grammar than traditional
    > methods........................"

    It worked for me. I didn't know how to talk or write until I got the
    Sims for my computer. Until then, I would indicate my desires by
    looking up at the ceiling and going "Woohoo!"

    --
    --Cuth
  11. Archived from groups: alt.games.the-sims (More info?)

    On 1/20/05 1:41 PM, in article
    HXSHd.967$YD5.589@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net, "Fawnhawk"
    <fawnhawk4375@no.earthlink.net> wrote:

    >
    > "hangover_girl" <hangovergirl@dodo.com.au> wrote in message >>
    >
    >> As funny as it sounds, my 9 year old son's psychologist recommended it for
    >> him! My boy has passive autism ~ which presents quite differently to
    >> atypicial autism or aspergers syndrome. He appears completely normal, has
    >> no oddities or in your face differences. He even 'passively' approaches
    >> obsessive behaviour, weird I know! However, he is still on the retarded
    >> level in social situations and that is why the doc suggested the sims. He
    >> claims that it helps to teach these kids how to interact as well as all
    >> the other basic needs that keeps you in the green! Funny thing is, my
    >> other 2 kids love sims and he can take it or leave it :)
    >
    > I am 27 and I have high functioning autism. I recently learned about the 3
    > categories of autism and wonder if mine is also passive. Can you tell me
    > more about that type or have any links discussing it?
    >
    > At one point, I realized that playing The Sims has actually helped me
    > socially in some major ways. The fact that they have the pluses and minuses
    > above their heads after conversations and interactions has taught me *how*
    > to think about other people's feelings about my behavior. Being literal, I
    > always think about whether my behavior caused a plus or minus above
    > someone's head. It has really helped me guide my behavior and what I will
    > say (such as whether being honest would be more harmful than helpful).
    >
    > Playing it has also showed me that being too forward (in the sims it would
    > mean advanced kissing or teasing before warm up interactions) such as asking
    > a personal question without small talk first will cause them to have a minus
    > above their head, yet they may still interact with me anyway even though
    > their mood is lowered. I have learned *how* to imagine what way my behavior
    > affected them, even though they may not directly show me or tell me they
    > have been affected.
    >
    > Fawnhawk
    >
    >
    I work with kids with several different kinds of autism. One thing they all
    have in common is that they all love the computer. I'm going to suggest
    trying the Sims out with them and see what happens. Thanks for the input!
    Barb
  12. Archived from groups: alt.games.the-sims (More info?)

    "Barb_H" wrote in message and "Fawnhawk" wrote after responding to
    "hangover_girl" who wrote in message >>
    >>
    >>> As funny as it sounds, my 9 year old son's psychologist recommended it
    >>> for
    >>> him! My boy has passive autism ~ which presents quite differently to
    >>> atypicial autism or aspergers syndrome. He appears completely normal,
    >>> has
    >>> no oddities or in your face differences. He even 'passively' approaches
    >>> obsessive behaviour, weird I know! However, he is still on the retarded
    >>> level in social situations and that is why the doc suggested the sims.
    >>> He
    >>> claims that it helps to teach these kids how to interact as well as all
    >>> the other basic needs that keeps you in the green! Funny thing is, my
    >>> other 2 kids love sims and he can take it or leave it :)
    >>
    >> I am 27 and I have high functioning autism. I recently learned about the
    >> 3
    >> categories of autism and wonder if mine is also passive. Can you tell me
    >> more about that type or have any links discussing it?
    >>
    >> At one point, I realized that playing The Sims has actually helped me
    >> socially in some major ways. The fact that they have the pluses and
    >> minuses
    >> above their heads after conversations and interactions has taught me
    >> *how*
    >> to think about other people's feelings about my behavior. Being literal,
    >> I
    >> always think about whether my behavior caused a plus or minus above
    >> someone's head. It has really helped me guide my behavior and what I
    >> will
    >> say (such as whether being honest would be more harmful than helpful).
    >>
    >> Playing it has also showed me that being too forward (in the sims it
    >> would
    >> mean advanced kissing or teasing before warm up interactions) such as
    >> asking
    >> a personal question without small talk first will cause them to have a
    >> minus
    >> above their head, yet they may still interact with me anyway even though
    >> their mood is lowered. I have learned *how* to imagine what way my
    >> behavior
    >> affected them, even though they may not directly show me or tell me they
    >> have been affected.
    >>
    >> Fawnhawk
    >>
    >>
    > I work with kids with several different kinds of autism. One thing they
    > all
    > have in common is that they all love the computer. I'm going to suggest
    > trying the Sims out with them and see what happens. Thanks for the input!
    > Barb
    >

    You're welcome Barb... I just hope you have enough computers for all of them
    :)) I know how addicted we all are!

    ~ jo

    http://thesims2.ea.com/mysimpage/mysimpage.php?user_id=223269
Ask a new question

Read More

Sims Games Video Games