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DDR 3 1333Mhz Ram Running @ 667Mhz?

Last response: in Overclocking
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April 11, 2010 11:25:37 AM

Hello :hello: 

I am Just Wondering if this is a stupid question or not. Please don't Dump on me if it is.

My DDR 3 1333mhz Ram (1x2GB Samsung memory) is running at 667mhz.
The FSB : DRAM Ratio Is 1:2, Does that have anything to do with it? If so how do i change it to 1:1?

Thanks in advance for all your answers :) 
a b } Memory
April 11, 2010 12:20:52 PM

where does it say it's running at 667? If that's in cpuz, then it's actually double that.

a b } Memory
April 11, 2010 2:11:59 PM

DDR stands for double rate, so 667MHz = 1334 (1333)MHz.
April 11, 2010 2:47:25 PM

Hello :hello: 

(Thank God For wikipedia)
In electronic engineering, DDR3 SDRAM or double-data-rate three synchronous dynamic random access memory is a random access memory interface technology used for high bandwidth storage of the working data of a computer or other digital electronic devices. DDR3 is part of the SDRAM family of technologies and is one of the many DRAM (dynamic random access memory) implementations.

DDR3 SDRAM is an improvement over its predecessor, DDR2 SDRAM, and the two are not compatible. The primary benefit of DDR3 is the ability to transfer at twice the data rate of DDR2 (I/O at 8× the data rate of the memory cells it contains), thus enabling higher bus rates and higher peak rates than earlier memory technologies. In addition, the DDR3 standard allows for chip capacities of 512 megabits to 8 gigabits, effectively enabling a maximum memory module size of 16 gigabytes.

With data being transferred 64 bits at a time per memory module, DDR3 SDRAM gives a transfer rate of (memory clock rate) × 4 (for bus clock multiplier) × 2 (for data rate) × 64 (number of bits transferred) / 8 (number of bits/byte). Thus with a memory clock frequency of 100 MHz, DDR3 SDRAM gives a maximum transfer rate of 6400 MB/s.

DDR3 is a DRAM interface specification; the actual DRAM arrays that store the data are the same as in any other type of DRAM, and have similar performance.(Thank God For wikipedia)

Thank You For Posting...

I have been humbled.

(Yes i was using Cpu-Z)
!