Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

RAID w/ motherboard RAID controller

Last response: in Storage
Share
May 19, 2010 3:51:03 PM

I'm getting ready to put together a new system. I am leaning toward this MB:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

My plan is to have one system drive (leaning toward the crucial Sata III) for my OS
and then 3 1-2TB drives set up in RAID 5. All my data goes here. I'll be using this
for a lot of A/V editing so I'll have many big files.

I want RAID for two reasons: I can have a "big drive" and not worry so much about
splitting my data across multiple drives and for failover. If a drive goes out, I can
rebuild the RAID.

Here's my question: I've read that not all RAID controllers build the RAID in the same way.
If my MB dies on me in 3 years, I can't assume that I can drop these three drives into
a new system and the RAID controller there will recognize them as 3 drives in a RAID.

Since it's likely that this MB won't be available anymore, am I then compelled to try to find
a compatible Intel Raid controller to read this? My only other option would be to build
a NAS and do frequent backups of the RAID, which will get even more expensive.

Best solution

a b V Motherboard
a c 359 G Storage
May 19, 2010 6:32:47 PM

Read very carefully in descriptions of the mobos you consider exactly which northbridge and southbridge chips are used on the mobo. Then go to the chipset manufacturers' websites, particularly the southbrige chip that controls hard drives. SOME mobo chipset makers will give guarantees that they will NOT change the way their chips handle RAID systems. In those cases they claim that any later chipset they make that is built into a new mobo will always be able to handle hard drives from a RAID set originally written by an earleir chipset from the same maker. This would make your job in the future (replacing a dead mobo) somewhat easier. Of course, you would want a large well-known and stable chipset manufacturer for this.

I did this once already. I deliberately chose a mobo that used an nVidia chipset because they made such statements on their website. Less than two years later the mobo failed and I bought one but a different manufacturer but with a newer nVidia chipset, and it just worked perfectly! So, one success story from a sample of one situation.
Share
May 19, 2010 9:19:41 PM

The marvell controllers can only do RAID 1 and 0. RAID 5 is possible on the intel ICH10R but that is only software raid. The Intel controller is better than the marvell controller in RAID 0.

SATA 6gb/s doesn't matter since hard drives can hardly break 150mb/s not to mention 300mb/s from sata 3gb/s

If I were you, I wouldn't do raid 5 since software raid sucks. Either get a real system or use RAID 0 or 1 or 1+0. RAID 0 would have best write/read performance but higher chance of failure. RAID 1 would be faster read performance but no gain in write and has a lot of redundant data. RAID 1+0 on the intel controller is your best bet. The Marvell controller only has 2 SATA 6GB/s ports anyway.

You can do RAID 0 and use a non raid drive to back up.
m
0
l
Related resources
May 19, 2010 9:36:52 PM

rofl_my_waffle said:
The marvell controllers can only do RAID 1 and 0. RAID 5 is possible on the intel ICH10R but that is only software raid. The Intel controller is better than the marvell controller in RAID 0.

SATA 6gb/s doesn't matter since hard drives can hardly break 150mb/s not to mention 300mb/s from sata 3gb/s

If I were you, I wouldn't do raid 5 since software raid sucks. Either get a real system or use RAID 0 or 1 or 1+0. RAID 0 would have best write/read performance but higher chance of failure. RAID 1 would be faster read performance but no gain in write and has a lot of redundant data. RAID 1+0 on the intel controller is your best bet. The Marvell controller only has 2 SATA 6GB/s ports anyway.

You can do RAID 0 and use a non raid drive to back up.


The motherboard manual for this says it's using the Intel Matrix Technology. The Marvell is used for the LAN ports. This made me feel a little more comfortable because of what Paperdoc said. Intel will probably be around for a while. I'm just checking to see if they guarantee that future RAID controllers they put out will handle RAID in the same way.
m
0
l
May 26, 2010 12:01:07 AM

Best answer selected by flavius64.
m
0
l
!