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Stripped Torx screws

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Anonymous
July 5, 2005 6:57:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

I'm trying to deal with small Torx screws on a drive case. They're
about T8, maybe T7. Tough to tell cause the screws are
'pre-stripped.' In other words, there's not much edge for a Torx
driver to grip them. They almost look like rounded allen-head screws.
I'm trying to figure out how to deal with them.

These are not the tamper-proof variety, so I don't need a hollow-point
Torx driver (if they even make them that small).

The first thing that occurred to me was to place a small Torx driver
in the holes and tap the end lightly with a mallet. That could do
more harm than good though, as this looks like very soft metal. It's
also a working disk drive case, so I don't want to damage the drive.

I could try a tiny screw extractor, but the risk is that it wouldn't
work and then the remainder of the screw would really jam things up.

Any other ideas?

More about : stripped torx screws

Anonymous
July 5, 2005 8:09:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

_ZZ wrote:
> I'm trying to deal with small Torx screws on a drive case. They're
> about T8, maybe T7. Tough to tell cause the screws are
> 'pre-stripped.'

I frequently use a soldering iron on the offending screw to loosen it
before attempting to turn it with a screw extractor
July 5, 2005 1:49:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

Small drill bit or grinding bit in a Dremel (other small drills are
available) should allow you to take the head off. If it's a drive, chances
are that once you've taken the head off the screw, the actual shank will
unscrew without any trouble because there won't be any pressure on it any
more. It's not as if it will be rusted in place, or if it is, you're
probably wasting your time anyway.

HTH
Mike.

"_ZZ" <_ZZ@nomail.org> wrote in message
news:0abkc1herd90ds26egdb80olmodm9n0dr7@4ax.com...
> I'm trying to deal with small Torx screws on a drive case. They're
> about T8, maybe T7. Tough to tell cause the screws are
> 'pre-stripped.' In other words, there's not much edge for a Torx
> driver to grip them. They almost look like rounded allen-head screws.
> I'm trying to figure out how to deal with them.
>
> These are not the tamper-proof variety, so I don't need a hollow-point
> Torx driver (if they even make them that small).
>
> The first thing that occurred to me was to place a small Torx driver
> in the holes and tap the end lightly with a mallet. That could do
> more harm than good though, as this looks like very soft metal. It's
> also a working disk drive case, so I don't want to damage the drive.
>
> I could try a tiny screw extractor, but the risk is that it wouldn't
> work and then the remainder of the screw would really jam things up.
>
> Any other ideas?
>
Related resources
Anonymous
July 5, 2005 2:28:45 PM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

_ZZ wrote:
> I'm trying to deal with small Torx screws on a drive case. They're
> about T8, maybe T7. Tough to tell cause the screws are
> 'pre-stripped.' In other words, there's not much edge for a Torx
> driver to grip them. They almost look like rounded allen-head screws.
> I'm trying to figure out how to deal with them.
>
> These are not the tamper-proof variety, so I don't need a hollow-point
> Torx driver (if they even make them that small).
>
> The first thing that occurred to me was to place a small Torx driver
> in the holes and tap the end lightly with a mallet. That could do
> more harm than good though, as this looks like very soft metal. It's
> also a working disk drive case, so I don't want to damage the drive.
>
> I could try a tiny screw extractor, but the risk is that it wouldn't
> work and then the remainder of the screw would really jam things up.
>
> Any other ideas?
>


Use a small (3/32"?) left-handed drill bit and start drilling out the
screw *very* slowly with a variable speed drill. Once the drill bit
bites into the screw, it will back the screw out. I've done this will
several very small computer philips screws -- I don't know why torx
would be any different.

Best regards,
Bob
Anonymous
July 5, 2005 3:22:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

"_ZZ" <_ZZ@nomail.org> wrote in message
news:0abkc1herd90ds26egdb80olmodm9n0dr7@4ax.com...
> I'm trying to deal with small Torx screws on a drive case. They're
> about T8, maybe T7. Tough to tell cause the screws are
> 'pre-stripped.' In other words, there's not much edge for a Torx
> driver to grip them. They almost look like rounded allen-head screws.
> I'm trying to figure out how to deal with them.
>
> These are not the tamper-proof variety, so I don't need a hollow-point
> Torx driver (if they even make them that small).
>
> The first thing that occurred to me was to place a small Torx driver
> in the holes and tap the end lightly with a mallet. That could do
> more harm than good though, as this looks like very soft metal. It's
> also a working disk drive case, so I don't want to damage the drive.
>
> I could try a tiny screw extractor, but the risk is that it wouldn't
> work and then the remainder of the screw would really jam things up.
>
> Any other ideas?
>
You mentioned its a working disk drive - why do you need to disassemble its
case? Such operations are strictly for the experts in a cleanroom
environment as even a tiny spec of dust getting in can ruin a HDD. If on the
other hand you're referring to screws which hold the drive in the PC
case/cage then a dremel with a cutting disk in it could be used to cut a
groove in the head to suit a flat blade screwdriver.

Paul
Anonymous
July 5, 2005 3:38:42 PM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

"_ZZ" wrote:
> I'm trying to deal with small Torx screws on a drive case. They're
> about T8, maybe T7. Tough to tell cause the screws are
> 'pre-stripped.' In other words, there's not much edge for a Torx
> driver to grip them. They almost look like rounded allen-head screws.
> I'm trying to figure out how to deal with them.
>
> These are not the tamper-proof variety, so I don't need a hollow-point
> Torx driver (if they even make them that small).
>
> The first thing that occurred to me was to place a small Torx driver
> in the holes and tap the end lightly with a mallet. That could do
> more harm than good though, as this looks like very soft metal. It's
> also a working disk drive case, so I don't want to damage the drive.
>
> I could try a tiny screw extractor, but the risk is that it wouldn't
> work and then the remainder of the screw would really jam things up.

Clamp a small pair of vise grips on the outside of the fastner to get the
screw started, then continue with whatever method (vise grips, fingers,
torx, et cetera) you prefer from then on out. If that doesn't work, slit
the screw and use a flat screwdriver.

Jon
Anonymous
July 5, 2005 4:08:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

In article <0abkc1herd90ds26egdb80olmodm9n0dr7@4ax.com>,
_ZZ <_ZZ@nomail.org> wrote:

> I'm trying to deal with small Torx screws on a drive case. They're
> about T8, maybe T7. Tough to tell cause the screws are
> 'pre-stripped.' In other words, there's not much edge for a Torx
> driver to grip them. They almost look like rounded allen-head screws.
> I'm trying to figure out how to deal with them.
>
> These are not the tamper-proof variety, so I don't need a hollow-point
> Torx driver (if they even make them that small).
>
> The first thing that occurred to me was to place a small Torx driver
> in the holes and tap the end lightly with a mallet. That could do
> more harm than good though, as this looks like very soft metal. It's
> also a working disk drive case, so I don't want to damage the drive.
>
> I could try a tiny screw extractor, but the risk is that it wouldn't
> work and then the remainder of the screw would really jam things up.
>
> Any other ideas?
>

I've found that a fractional drop of Kroil let to soak overnite will
work wonders. Beware that it will likely creep inside the drive with
unknown but seldom beneficial results - I've only used it on dead drives.

--
Free men own guns, slaves don't
www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/5357/
Anonymous
July 5, 2005 5:21:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

Get a life...


<robertharvey@my-deja.com> schreef in bericht
news:1120561786.341797.40500@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
: _ZZ wrote:
: > I'm trying to deal with small Torx screws on a drive case. They're
: > about T8, maybe T7. Tough to tell cause the screws are
: > 'pre-stripped.'
:
: I frequently use a soldering iron on the offending screw to loosen it
: before attempting to turn it with a screw extractor
:
Anonymous
July 5, 2005 6:36:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

Mike wrote:

> Small drill bit or grinding bit in a Dremel (other small drills are
> available) should allow you to take the head off.


_________________________________________________

I use a Dremel too, but not to take the head off. Use a thin cutting
wheel and grind a screwdriver slot in the head, then use a regular
screwdriver to remove it. Works great if done carefully.

--
BT
Anonymous
July 5, 2005 7:02:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

"_ZZ" <_ZZ@nomail.org> wrote in message
news:0abkc1herd90ds26egdb80olmodm9n0dr7@4ax.com...
> I'm trying to deal with small Torx screws on a drive case. They're
> about T8, maybe T7. Tough to tell cause the screws are
> 'pre-stripped.' In other words, there's not much edge for a Torx
> driver to grip them. They almost look like rounded allen-head screws.
> I'm trying to figure out how to deal with them.
>
> These are not the tamper-proof variety, so I don't need a hollow-point
> Torx driver (if they even make them that small).
>
> The first thing that occurred to me was to place a small Torx driver
> in the holes and tap the end lightly with a mallet. That could do
> more harm than good though, as this looks like very soft metal. It's
> also a working disk drive case, so I don't want to damage the drive.
>
> I could try a tiny screw extractor, but the risk is that it wouldn't
> work and then the remainder of the screw would really jam things up.
>
> Any other ideas?
>

Bolt splitter and a mallet. If that fails I usually get out the angle
grinder.

ss.
Anonymous
July 5, 2005 7:24:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

"Nick Hull" <nhull@access4less.net> wrote in message
news:nhull-E53323.08065205072005@news1.east.earthlink.net...
> In article <0abkc1herd90ds26egdb80olmodm9n0dr7@4ax.com>,
> _ZZ <_ZZ@nomail.org> wrote:
>
>> I'm trying to deal with small Torx screws on a drive case. They're
>> about T8, maybe T7. Tough to tell cause the screws are
>> 'pre-stripped.' In other words, there's not much edge for a Torx
>> driver to grip them. They almost look like rounded allen-head screws.
>> I'm trying to figure out how to deal with them.
>>
>> These are not the tamper-proof variety, so I don't need a hollow-point
>> Torx driver (if they even make them that small).
>>
>> The first thing that occurred to me was to place a small Torx driver
>> in the holes and tap the end lightly with a mallet. That could do
>> more harm than good though, as this looks like very soft metal. It's
>> also a working disk drive case, so I don't want to damage the drive.
>>
>> I could try a tiny screw extractor, but the risk is that it wouldn't
>> work and then the remainder of the screw would really jam things up.
>>
>> Any other ideas?
>>
>
> I've found that a fractional drop of Kroil let to soak overnite will
> work wonders. Beware that it will likely creep inside the drive with
> unknown but seldom beneficial results - I've only used it on dead drives.
>
> --
> Free men own guns, slaves don't
>
Slaves don`t need guns, `cos they`ve mostly been shot by the good old boys
with guns !!
>
> www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/5357/
Anonymous
July 5, 2005 7:28:43 PM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 11:38:42 -0700, "Jon Danniken"
<jonREMOVETHISdanniken@yahoo.com> wrote:

>"_ZZ" wrote:

>> I could try a tiny screw extractor, but the risk is that it wouldn't
>> work and then the remainder of the screw would really jam things up.
>
>Clamp a small pair of vise grips on the outside of the fastner to get the
>screw started, then continue with whatever method (vise grips, fingers,
>torx, et cetera) you prefer from then on out. If that doesn't work, slit
>the screw and use a flat screwdriver.
>
>Jon

You know, that would have been my first try, but the screws are
indented (bastards! <g>).

I have a Dremel tool, but now I'm wishing I had bought the vari-speed.
The full-speed one is great for cutting circuit boards, etc. but a bit
scarey in this application. I also don't like the thought of a blade
flying apart at such a rotational speed. I saw that with a sanding
disk once...Impressive enough.

Is there a light-weight, low-powered tool that does this kind of thing
well? Probably a small, versatile battery-powered drill of some kind.
Between a battery-powered screwdriver and a plugin Dremel.
Anonymous
July 5, 2005 9:04:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

On Tue, 05 Jul 2005 02:57:00 -0400, _ZZ <_ZZ@nomail.org>
wrote:

>I'm trying to deal with small Torx screws on a drive case. They're
>about T8, maybe T7. Tough to tell cause the screws are
>'pre-stripped.' In other words, there's not much edge for a Torx
>driver to grip them. They almost look like rounded allen-head screws.
>I'm trying to figure out how to deal with them.

"Pre-stripped" as-in, their head used to be better but a
tool has stripped it some, or pre-stripped as-in, this is an
unusual screw head that is still in pristine condition?


>
>These are not the tamper-proof variety, so I don't need a hollow-point
>Torx driver (if they even make them that small).
>
>The first thing that occurred to me was to place a small Torx driver
>in the holes and tap the end lightly with a mallet. That could do
>more harm than good though, as this looks like very soft metal. It's
>also a working disk drive case, so I don't want to damage the drive.

You should not tap it with a mallet. Sudden shock to a
working (viable) drive is a bad idea ignoring the screws.



>
>I could try a tiny screw extractor, but the risk is that it wouldn't
>work and then the remainder of the screw would really jam things up.
>
>Any other ideas?

Find the closest shaped bit you can that's a little
oversized. From your description it would be an allen bit.
Since that is not a complex shaped pattern you can probably
replicate it with minimal effort. Take a fine file and
reduce the bit just enough to fit with minimal-to-no force
to insert it.
Anonymous
July 5, 2005 9:04:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

On Tue, 05 Jul 2005 17:04:51 GMT, kony <spam@spam.com> wrote:

>On Tue, 05 Jul 2005 02:57:00 -0400, _ZZ <_ZZ@nomail.org>
>wrote:
>
>>I'm trying to deal with small Torx screws on a drive case. They're
>>about T8, maybe T7. Tough to tell cause the screws are
>>'pre-stripped.' In other words, there's not much edge for a Torx
>>driver to grip them. They almost look like rounded allen-head screws.
>>I'm trying to figure out how to deal with them.
>
>"Pre-stripped" as-in, their head used to be better but a
>tool has stripped it some, or pre-stripped as-in, this is an
>unusual screw head that is still in pristine condition?

Thanks to all for some great ideas that never occurred to me.

I should have explained a bit better: By 'Drive Case' I meant that
this is an external USB 2.0 case. I'm not dismantling the actual
drive--it's intact, inside this case.

The original objective was to buy the external USB2 case with a larger
drive, then swap the drive in the laptop with the drive in the case.
Imagine my surprise. 'Pre-stripped' means that the original Torx (if
that's even what they are) have barely any edge...very rounded, almost
like an allen indent, but even rounder. They obviously didn't want
people messing with their drive case. I've seen tons of cases like
this, and this is the only one that uses such a bizarre screw.

Also, the screws are slightly indented. Metal from the enclosure
forms a shoulder around it. But the idea of sawing a flat-blade slot
may work. I may be able to get a small blade in there.

Then I should probably find replacement screws. They'll probably be
some odd Martian thread.
Anonymous
July 5, 2005 9:04:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

_ZZ wrote:
>
> <snip>
>
> Thanks to all for some great ideas that never occurred to me.
>
> I should have explained a bit better: By 'Drive Case' I meant that
> this is an external USB 2.0 case. I'm not dismantling the actual
> drive--it's intact, inside this case.
>
> The original objective was to buy the external USB2 case with a larger
> drive, then swap the drive in the laptop with the drive in the case.
> Imagine my surprise. 'Pre-stripped' means that the original Torx (if
> that's even what they are) have barely any edge...very rounded, almost
> like an allen indent, but even rounder. They obviously didn't want
> people messing with their drive case. I've seen tons of cases like
> this, and this is the only one that uses such a bizarre screw.
>
> Also, the screws are slightly indented. Metal from the enclosure
> forms a shoulder around it. But the idea of sawing a flat-blade slot
> may work. I may be able to get a small blade in there.
>
> Then I should probably find replacement screws. They'll probably be
> some odd Martian thread.

They may *not* be Torx screws. Google "safety screws" for more info
on head/driver designs.

Notan
Anonymous
July 5, 2005 9:04:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 12:21:05 -0700 , _ZZ <_ZZ@nomail.org> wrote:

>On Tue, 05 Jul 2005 17:04:51 GMT, kony <spam@spam.com> wrote:
>
>>On Tue, 05 Jul 2005 02:57:00 -0400, _ZZ <_ZZ@nomail.org>
>>wrote:
>>
>>>I'm trying to deal with small Torx screws on a drive case. They're
>>>about T8, maybe T7. Tough to tell cause the screws are
>>>'pre-stripped.' In other words, there's not much edge for a Torx
>>>driver to grip them. They almost look like rounded allen-head screws.
>>>I'm trying to figure out how to deal with them.
>>
>>"Pre-stripped" as-in, their head used to be better but a
>>tool has stripped it some, or pre-stripped as-in, this is an
>>unusual screw head that is still in pristine condition?
>
>Thanks to all for some great ideas that never occurred to me.
>
>I should have explained a bit better: By 'Drive Case' I meant that
>this is an external USB 2.0 case. I'm not dismantling the actual
>drive--it's intact, inside this case.
>
>The original objective was to buy the external USB2 case with a larger
>drive, then swap the drive in the laptop with the drive in the case.
>Imagine my surprise. 'Pre-stripped' means that the original Torx (if
>that's even what they are) have barely any edge...very rounded, almost
>like an allen indent, but even rounder.

Are you sure these aren't a "pop-rivet" sort of fastener - IE: not a
"screw" at all? If so, you'll have to drill them out.

FWIW, I've see external USB Hard Drive cases available for under $10
US (actually there are a few on Ebay right now for $1, (plus like $8
shipping). You might be better off just to get a new one (unless
you're bored and this is a "challenge" <g>).




>They obviously didn't want
>people messing with their drive case. I've seen tons of cases like
>this, and this is the only one that uses such a bizarre screw.
>
>Also, the screws are slightly indented. Metal from the enclosure
>forms a shoulder around it. But the idea of sawing a flat-blade slot
>may work. I may be able to get a small blade in there.
>
>Then I should probably find replacement screws. They'll probably be
>some odd Martian thread.
Anonymous
July 5, 2005 9:04:54 PM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

Notan wrote:
>
> <snip>
>
> They may *not* be Torx screws. Google "safety screws" for more info
> on head/driver designs.

You might also want to check Sears or your local hardware store. They've
got "damaged screw removers," that, if small enough, might do the trick.

Notan
Anonymous
July 5, 2005 9:26:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

_ZZ wrote:
> I'm trying to deal with small Torx screws on a drive case. They're
> about T8, maybe T7. Tough to tell cause the screws are
> 'pre-stripped.' In other words, there's not much edge for a Torx
> driver to grip them. They almost look like rounded allen-head screws.
> I'm trying to figure out how to deal with them.
>
> These are not the tamper-proof variety, so I don't need a hollow-point
> Torx driver (if they even make them that small).
>
> The first thing that occurred to me was to place a small Torx driver
> in the holes and tap the end lightly with a mallet. That could do
> more harm than good though, as this looks like very soft metal. It's
> also a working disk drive case, so I don't want to damage the drive.
>
> I could try a tiny screw extractor, but the risk is that it wouldn't
> work and then the remainder of the screw would really jam things up.
>
> Any other ideas?

I would use an easyout. I would also tape up the drive so everything
was covered before beginning as you will be creating small bits of metal
that could destroy the drive it any at all got inside.

I would suggest the tape idea for any method you come up with.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
Anonymous
July 5, 2005 10:30:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

I would use the thin cut-off wheel on a
moto-tool to cut a slot across
the head. Then use a flat screwdriver.
If the screw is a flat head, you
may have the use a small "easy out." as
others have suggested.

Joseph Meehan wrote:
> _ZZ wrote:
>
>>I'm trying to deal with small Torx screws on a drive case. They're
>>about T8, maybe T7. Tough to tell cause the screws are
>>'pre-stripped.' In other words, there's not much edge for a Torx
>>driver to grip them. They almost look like rounded allen-head screws.
>>I'm trying to figure out how to deal with them.
>>
>>These are not the tamper-proof variety, so I don't need a hollow-point
>>Torx driver (if they even make them that small).
>>
>>The first thing that occurred to me was to place a small Torx driver
>>in the holes and tap the end lightly with a mallet. That could do
>>more harm than good though, as this looks like very soft metal. It's
>>also a working disk drive case, so I don't want to damage the drive.
>>
>>I could try a tiny screw extractor, but the risk is that it wouldn't
>>work and then the remainder of the screw would really jam things up.
>>
>>Any other ideas?
Anonymous
July 6, 2005 2:14:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

> You know, that would have been my first try, but the screws are
> indented (bastards! <g>).
>
> I have a Dremel tool, but now I'm wishing I had bought the vari-speed.
> The full-speed one is great for cutting circuit boards, etc. but a bit
> scarey in this application. I also don't like the thought of a blade
> flying apart at such a rotational speed. I saw that with a sanding
> disk once...Impressive enough.
>
> Is there a light-weight, low-powered tool that does this kind of thing
> well? Probably a small, versatile battery-powered drill of some kind.
> Between a battery-powered screwdriver and a plugin Dremel.
>

You might try a "worn down" cutoff
wheel. When worn, the diameter can
be as small as 3/8". Not knowing the
exact geometry of the drive, it's hard
to know if this would work. You still
have to physically get the tool in the
area. BTW, use safety glasses ... these
wheels can fly when they break up
and they WILL break.
Anonymous
July 6, 2005 7:26:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

Bill Turner wrote:
> I use a Dremel too, but not to take the head off. Use a thin cutting
> wheel and grind a screwdriver slot in the head, then use a regular
> screwdriver to remove it. Works great if done carefully.


Back in the days when I used to help do aircraft annual inspections, we often
used this technique for inspection port screw heads that were stripped. It
works great most of the time.



--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

mschnerd@carolina.rr.com.REMOVE
Anonymous
July 6, 2005 10:28:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

On Wed, 06 Jul 2005 03:26:46 GMT, "Mortimer Schnerd, RN"
<mortschnerd@carolina.rr.com.remove> wrote:

>Bill Turner wrote:
>> I use a Dremel too, but not to take the head off. Use a thin cutting
>> wheel and grind a screwdriver slot in the head, then use a regular
>> screwdriver to remove it. Works great if done carefully.
>
>
>Back in the days when I used to help do aircraft annual inspections, we often
>used this technique for inspection port screw heads that were stripped. It
>works great most of the time.


It is good for many situations but I believe OP already
described this as one of the more typical plastic enclosure
methods where the screws are well-recessed, it would require
cutting a fair distance through the casing around the screw,
maybe even enough to make the casing structurally unsound
due to cutting the slots.
Anonymous
July 6, 2005 3:05:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

>
>>Bill Turner wrote:
>>> I use a Dremel too, but not to take the head off. Use a thin cutting
>>> wheel and grind a screwdriver slot in the head, then use a regular
>>> screwdriver to remove it. Works great if done carefully.
>>
>>
>>Back in the days when I used to help do aircraft annual inspections, we often
>>used this technique for inspection port screw heads that were stripped. It
>>works great most of the time.
>
>
>It is good for many situations but I believe OP already
>described this as one of the more typical plastic enclosure
>methods where the screws are well-recessed, it would require
>cutting a fair distance through the casing around the screw,
>maybe even enough to make the casing structurally unsound
>due to cutting the slots.

Line the depression with paper, with the screw-head
poking through. Then mix up a wad of 2-part epoxy,
and stuff it in the hole.
Anonymous
July 6, 2005 10:11:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

On Wed, 06 Jul 2005 11:05:13 -0400, Goedjn
<prose@mail.uri.edu> wrote:

>
>>
>>>Bill Turner wrote:
>>>> I use a Dremel too, but not to take the head off. Use a thin cutting
>>>> wheel and grind a screwdriver slot in the head, then use a regular
>>>> screwdriver to remove it. Works great if done carefully.
>>>
>>>
>>>Back in the days when I used to help do aircraft annual inspections, we often
>>>used this technique for inspection port screw heads that were stripped. It
>>>works great most of the time.
>>
>>
>>It is good for many situations but I believe OP already
>>described this as one of the more typical plastic enclosure
>>methods where the screws are well-recessed, it would require
>>cutting a fair distance through the casing around the screw,
>>maybe even enough to make the casing structurally unsound
>>due to cutting the slots.
>
>Line the depression with paper, with the screw-head
>poking through. Then mix up a wad of 2-part epoxy,
>and stuff it in the hole.

This epoxy idea may work, but it seems you left out a few
details as a hole filled with epoxy isn't much easier to get
out than one with an odd head pattern. I have used epoxy
before though, sometimes with success and other times it
just tore up the epoxy. This was using JDWeld, do you have
a better suggestion for a stronger epoxy? I'd also thought
about saving some aluminum filings the next time I did any
metalwork (non-computer related, just fine almost dustlike
Al) then mixing that into the epoxy to fortify it.

I still like my idea of filing down a bit because if you
ever come across that pattern & size again you'd already
have the bit.
Anonymous
August 23, 2005 8:21:31 AM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

I was able to remove the torx screws on my E2 with a very small (1/16")
regular slotted screwdriver.

GC


"_ZZ" <_ZZ@nomail.org> wrote in message
news:0abkc1herd90ds26egdb80olmodm9n0dr7@4ax.com...
> I'm trying to deal with small Torx screws on a drive case. They're
> about T8, maybe T7. Tough to tell cause the screws are
> 'pre-stripped.' In other words, there's not much edge for a Torx
> driver to grip them. They almost look like rounded allen-head screws.
> I'm trying to figure out how to deal with them.
>
> These are not the tamper-proof variety, so I don't need a hollow-point
> Torx driver (if they even make them that small).
>
> The first thing that occurred to me was to place a small Torx driver
> in the holes and tap the end lightly with a mallet. That could do
> more harm than good though, as this looks like very soft metal. It's
> also a working disk drive case, so I don't want to damage the drive.
>
> I could try a tiny screw extractor, but the risk is that it wouldn't
> work and then the remainder of the screw would really jam things up.
>
> Any other ideas?
>
>
Anonymous
August 23, 2005 4:41:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

"Chips" <Chips1@reliableins.nospam> wrote in message
news:fvxOe.182$5k1.103@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net...
>I was able to remove the torx screws on my E2 with a very small (1/16")
>regular slotted screwdriver.
>
> GC
>
>
> "_ZZ" <_ZZ@nomail.org> wrote in message
> news:0abkc1herd90ds26egdb80olmodm9n0dr7@4ax.com...
>> I'm trying to deal with small Torx screws on a drive case. They're
>> about T8, maybe T7. Tough to tell cause the screws are
>> 'pre-stripped.' In other words, there's not much edge for a Torx
>> driver to grip them. They almost look like rounded allen-head screws.
>> I'm trying to figure out how to deal with them.
>>
>> These are not the tamper-proof variety, so I don't need a hollow-point
>> Torx driver (if they even make them that small).
>>
>> The first thing that occurred to me was to place a small Torx driver
>> in the holes and tap the end lightly with a mallet. That could do
>> more harm than good though, as this looks like very soft metal. It's
>> also a working disk drive case, so I don't want to damage the drive.
>>
>> I could try a tiny screw extractor, but the risk is that it wouldn't
>> work and then the remainder of the screw would really jam things up.
>>
>> Any other ideas?
>>
Heating the screw with a soldering iron will help to free it, if you can
devise a method of turning it.
bw..OJ
August 23, 2005 5:20:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.home.repair,alt.comp.hardware,comp.sys.palmtops (More info?)

On Tue, 23 Aug 2005 12:41:52 GMT, "old jon"
<ImNotIn@ntlworld.com.invalid> wrote:

>Heating the screw with a soldering iron will help to free it, if you can
>devise a method of turning it.

No. Heating the screw will make it expand, which will make it harder
to extract.

Sears has screw extractors. Get the kind for screws that cannot be
drilled - the one that fits over the head of the screw and has
left-handed protrusions inside which grip the screw.

Go easy or you will snap the screw off. You should soak the threads in
anti-seize liquid like WD-40 overnight to help ease the unscrewing.
!