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How's this for a custom water cooling loop?

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a b K Overclocking
April 30, 2010 3:13:44 PM

So, after reading about arthurh's water cooling loop (ran directly from the input to his house, and directed right back out, so it's not technically a closed loop), I felt... inspired. My computer (in "man cave") sits on the opposite side of the wall where my water system sits, so it would be a cinch to run some pipe under the house and some tubing up onto my computer and then right back out. I even figured that I could put the output back into my aerator tank, that way I would not be wasting any water.

Well, the pumps I had the choice of (without spending extravagant amounts of money) were all submersible, and the only place I could submerse them in was the aerator tank. Now, the water in my area is frighteningly sulfuric, and the aerator is what takes that out of the water. It pumps air into the water to make the sulfur stick to it and float to the top and evaporate out, and adding chlorine to it to kill the bacteria that make release the sulfur. I would have to stick the pump in the top of the aerator, which is the part with the the most chlorine and the most sulfur, so that pump would be dead after just a few weeks.

After much deliberation on the subject, I decided to have a closed loop, but instead of having a small reservoir and at least a 120x4 rad (I have a Xeon X3440 quad [i7] at 3.8GHz, 1.2v w/HT, and an HD5870), I wondered what a large, 5-gallon reservoir would do. After poking around and running some numbers, it would take a while for all of that water to heat up, and if it did, I would just put a sealed, frozen bottle of water into it to cool it down.

Anyway, so I have most of the parts put together already, just waiting now on the two water blocks, which should be arriving today.

The reservoir is a 5-gallon water jug. My dad helped me cut the top rim of it off, to turn it into a lid to allow easy removal of the pump and to allow for addition of any fluids or the frozen bottle.

The pump is a 200GPH Bestec pump I got at Home Depot. The output is 5/8", but I converted it to 3/8" ID tubing, 1/2" OD. This goes straight up about 4 feet to the top of my desk where my computer sits, then hits a T and splits into two loops, one for my CPU and one for the GPU. I had considered WCing my VRMs and NB, however, I could not find a set of VRM blocks that were specifically compatible (although one set for the Asus P7P55D should match up perfectly, as the boards are ridiculously similar.

The CPU block is a Swiftech Apogee GTZ, as I could not justify spending another $35 for the XT only to get a slight temperature decrease.

The GPU block is an EK 5870 block for non-reference cards (my 5870 is a 2nd gen Sapphire Vapor-X with the custom PC board).

What does everyone think about it?
April 30, 2010 4:24:21 PM

just a suggestion for the future but aquarium pumps are made to withstand ALOT of acidity, alkalinity, and other PH changes due to the fact that there are alot of diff fish that live in alot of diff climates. there are aquarium pumps out there for about $60 that push out about 500-700gph!!! =D

that kind of pump will help you utilize that massive res of yours. you and me both have made loops out of stuff we've bought at hardware stores ^_^ cudos to you my friend. i got my stuff at ace hardware and all the hardware and parts were SOOO CHEAP!!!

the only thing i suggest is that you learn to work with acrylic a bit so when you want to, you can put that gal res into your empty 5.25 drives. i have 3full bays dedicated to a single res. my res and my rad both hold roughly around half a gal ^_^

ur build sounds awsome. mind posting up pics?
a b K Overclocking
April 30, 2010 10:15:41 PM

i4yue said:
just a suggestion for the future but aquarium pumps are made to withstand ALOT of acidity, alkalinity, and other PH changes due to the fact that there are alot of diff fish that live in alot of diff climates. there are aquarium pumps out there for about $60 that push out about 500-700gph!!! =D

that kind of pump will help you utilize that massive res of yours. you and me both have made loops out of stuff we've bought at hardware stores ^_^ cudos to you my friend. i got my stuff at ace hardware and all the hardware and parts were SOOO CHEAP!!!

the only thing i suggest is that you learn to work with acrylic a bit so when you want to, you can put that gal res into your empty 5.25 drives. i have 3full bays dedicated to a single res. my res and my rad both hold roughly around half a gal ^_^

ur build sounds awsome. mind posting up pics?

I hadn't thought about an aquarium pump, I was just worried about the sulfur, as I don't know of anything but bacteria that can live in water with this high of a sulfur content.

Also, I have no drive bays. :) 






These are both before pics, when I just finished putting the tech station together and still had my H50 on.

I'm currently testing the seals right now. Both blocks came in within 10 minutes of each other, and both look AMAZING. The GPU block is almost 2 pounds, and almost all copper!
Related resources
May 1, 2010 12:46:41 AM

pretty neat
a b K Overclocking
May 1, 2010 2:55:58 AM

Alrighty, so I finished it all up tonight! It was a little tough trying to get the water block onto the 5870, as it had a bunch of tiny screws that had to have washers on them on the opposite side, THEN put the block over top of it! Then, I had trouble getting the backplate for the GTZ to go on, since it was almost flat. Not only that, but it was also only LGA775 compatible (my mobo has 775 and 1156, thank God), so it sits on the CPU a little cockeyed, which might explain my odd CPU temperatures. Anyway, pics first!

My res:


Leak testing:


Tada!


I now know that I should have run both input and output of the 5870 block out the back instead of one in each direction.


Yes, I wrote on the tubing which tube goes where!


Down into the rabbit hole...


... and into the res!
a b K Overclocking
May 1, 2010 3:07:22 AM

After putting it all together, I ran the pump for ~30 minutes again to make sure there were no leaks.

After turning it on, the fan on the 8800GT BLASTED on for ~40 seconds as always, but after it turned back down to around 20%, I noticed one thing: silence. My ceiling fan is 10 times louder than that pump. The Thunderblades I had on the H50 before were pretty loud, even when ran at 5V instead of 12V, and the 5870's fan, although freakin huge, would spin up pretty high and rise in noise fairly quickly (although still MUCH quieter than the stock fan).

As for temperatures, idle temps SHOT down (as expected) for the GPU and not much change for the CPU (from the H50).

GPU idles at 26C for the core and 28C for the VRMs. It loads at 40C and 48C, respectively, instead of 37C idle and 83C load!

The CPU is a different story, though. On the H50, it would idle around 37C and load around 77C, while now on full water, it idles around 35C and loads around 67C. A 10C difference at load is good, but not what I was expecting, especially considering the MASSIVE drop the GPU took.

I'm assuming that it's just how the CPU is mounted, with LGA775 mounts rotated about 8 degrees or so clockwise to how the 1156 mount is placed. I used my H50's mounting plate to hold the GTZ down, so I'm gonna try and put it into the 1156 holes and see if it makes a difference. Wish me luck!
a b K Overclocking
May 1, 2010 3:32:51 AM

Ok, now doing long tests with Furmark & Prime to test water temperature fluctuation, and after just a few minutes, the CPU hit 80C. Something is really wrong here. I checked, rechecked, and checked again to make sure that it was mounted ok, and with good pressure, and the mount is fine. Tomorrow morning I'm gonna try and use teh 1156 holes on the H50 mount and see if that helps anything. :( 
a c 86 K Overclocking
May 1, 2010 3:51:28 AM

This is fun. Watching this thread.
a b K Overclocking
May 1, 2010 3:56:12 AM

After running the short torture test, the water is warm. Not hot, but warm, much warmer than it needs to be. I didn't think that that much water would heat up nearly that fast. I'm gonna have to rethink not having a rad. :/ 
May 1, 2010 9:28:44 PM

seeing that you're ghetto rigging everything together...might as well drop by the junk yard and get yourself a big ass radiator from some broken down car. either that or a few oil/tranny coolers would do great also.

i really didnt realize that you didnt have a rad until you said so...i just kinda assumed that you had one. YOU NEED ONE for running your comp for extended periods of time =)
a c 86 K Overclocking
May 2, 2010 1:15:53 AM

Fun! Still watching.
a b K Overclocking
May 2, 2010 2:54:47 AM

I LOVE how ghetto this thing is. Apparently I'm still going for the "most ghetto computer ever" award. :D 

I'll have to see if my dad can procure one up for me, he'd know what to look for. Then it's just cleaning it out and slapping it in.

Again, going with the whole massive size thing, you think it would require a fan on the rad if it was that large?

And any ideas on why my CPU is so much hotter than my GPU is at both idle and load? I think that they would be in the same neighborhood (26C for the GPU, but the CPU usually sits around 37C or so), but are quite a bit off.
a c 86 K Overclocking
May 2, 2010 5:40:09 AM

The CPU is very critical with cooling. The die is small. Your pump probably has a very low head pressure, with rstiction from the blocks and you placing the res douwn low your CPU block flow rate sucks.

A CPU block has many pins inside. It needs crazy flow rates (more than one GPM) to create turbulence for the molecules to dance on every surface and gain heat to be carried away. Your GPU's have a smooth sureface and just need a flow to remove heat.

Thus the lesson continues.........

And umm if you get a stoopid car rad, make sure it's not aliminum cores. MOST are. If so, you'll need a 25% solution of antifreeze and a biocide syill, antifeeze has no biocide.

Lesson continues....

If you get a car rad, yes you need airflow. But a good 20" house fan should be enough.

Lesson given.

Actually, it's not ghetto, it's standard hack no clue stuff. You don't know anything about watercooling, you ran out and spent tons of your dads money and didn't figure it out before. Once your done playing with a silly car rad, you'll ask your dad for a $70 pump, a $100 rad and be done. And have a proper WC rig.

Back to watching this...................
a b K Overclocking
May 2, 2010 3:42:45 PM

FWIW, Conumdrum, the only thing my dad pitched in was cutting the res. I've got my own job, house, and wife.

I've been looking into watercooling since 2006, back when my Athlon 64 3700+ was a great performer. I was planning on making a normal loop when I figured that I'd try something different and see how it turns out, just like I have been with extreme cooling (dry ice a few weeks ago and LN2 last night). My friend and I use very unorthodox methods to get our results, and this wasn't gonna be any different, just an experiment to see what works, and if it did, then great! But if it didn't (like now), then change it up til it does.

Anyways, my pump has an output of 200GPH (3.33 GPM) and sits about 4.5 feet below my system. I can bring the res and pump up by 2.5 feet no problems, and with some effort and moving around of crapola on my desk, can bring it up by about 3.5 feet. I know that this would help pressure to the system out.

Since the GPU doesn't need near as much pressure, would it better to use an F-style splitter instead of a T?

I made a diagram of how it is currently set up, just keep in mind that it is very not to scale!

May 2, 2010 6:06:27 PM

really dont think the type of splitter really matters...but thats just my personal opinion.

another alternative to using a car radiator is using a waterfall type water cooler? the more surface area the water has, the faster the warm water evaporates. dunno if a small waterfall inside of your massive reservoir is enough to cool your water enough though.

something like this would definitely cool your water enough and would make a great addition to the rooms atmosphere ^_^

http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=waterfall+foun...

yes i know...the price...but seeing how you're ghettoing everything already you might as well learn to work with wood and acrylic and make one yourself.



might actually make one myself now =)
a b K Overclocking
May 2, 2010 6:38:24 PM

I LOVE the waterfall thing! And, it just so happens that my dad recently gave me 8 24.48 sheets of acrylic that he had extra from a building job he did.

I think that running water is an awesome addition to any room. I love the sound, it's very soothing (and can make you pee a lot :lol:  ), and I've been looking for one to add to my computer room for quite some time now.

This is an awesome plan. I'm just wondering how much heat it would be able to dissipate. Even if not as much as I need, it will be one addition to my computer that my wife will like! I would even be able to make the top wide enough for some 120mm fans to blow down on it to help with the dissipation. I could even add some copper to the top of it and make channels with it to flow over.
May 2, 2010 7:31:16 PM

The "waterfall thing" is known as evaporative cooling. It's used in large scale cooling since it is extremely efficient. It has also been used in water cooling techniques (google "water bong"). If you are familiar with swamp coolers, it works on a similar principle. It requires two conditions:

1) The air needs to be relatively dry

2) The water needs prolonged exposure to the air in droplet form

Heat is exchanged with the air as the water passes through it in droplet form. At the same time, some of the water evaporates, which absorbs heat from the environment, which cools the remaining water even further. You can reach sub-ambient temperatures using this method.

The downside:

Prolonged exposure to the air also exposes the water to many other things, such as mold and algae spores. If you do not use a biocide (and continually renew it in your loop) you will end up with a mold or algae bloom. Not very pretty for your radiators and water blocks. Institutional chillers use a heat exchange and an internal closed loop to prevent this from being an issue. The problem is that a heat exchange at the scale we are talking about (one computer) is very inefficient and does not work well.

Also, if you are using wonderful stuff like antifreeze in your loop, you are introducing that into the air you breathe in aerosol form. Ethyl glycol alcohol (antifreeze) is an accumulative poison. If you do have to use an anti-shearing agent in your loop, it is much better to use the less lethal cousin of glycol alcohol, polypropelyne glycol alcohol.

It will also raise the ambient temperature (and here's the kicker) the humidity in the room. High humidity environments are not really all that good for computers.
a b K Overclocking
May 2, 2010 7:57:21 PM

Someone actually just sent me a link to a water bong (a very elaborate one, at that, used to cool three separate computers in a single, long loop).

Thanks for the very informative reply. So, in essence, the water would be evaporating instead of just transferring heat? What if it was a sealed loop still, with the water entering the top of the acrylic and trickling down to the bottom to reenter the reservoir? Would there be any benefit in doing it like that, or would there be little to no heat transfer through and out of the acrylic? I would have cooling fans blowing from the top down onto the back of the acrylic sheet.

I actually live in south Florida, home of soaring temperatures and raging humidity (regularly between 75 and 100% humidity) during the spring/summer/fall. However, the air is relatively dry inside my house.
May 2, 2010 8:40:33 PM

the evaporating effect of the waterfall is what cools the water down. without water evaporating there is no cooling benefit in building something in that scale. all that is needed to prevent an algae bloom is biocide OR anti-algaeside from walmart. instead of using the prescribed 10 drops per 10 gal or w/e the bottle says...use ALOT more and insure that no algae ever grows in that water.

what hound prolly didnt read was that u should use antifreeze if you were to use a car radiator...but with acrylic waterfalls you wouldnt even need antifreeze or anything of that sort. there are alot of watercooling websites online that sell anti-corrosion stuff.

http://www.frozencpu.com/products/10965/ex-tub-691/Anti...

http://www.frozencpu.com/products/7086/ex-liq-95/Feser_...

all the corrosion blocker is is ethanol glycol and other stuff...heres the msds for that blocker. doesnt sound like its very toxic or harmful at all.

http://www.frozencpu.com/images/products/pdf/ex-liq-75....

i personally would stick with the waterfall idea without using antifreeze. keep it open loop also to allow for evaporating. id be a really fun project =D im thinking about adding a fountain inside my house for this same purpose too...just at a MUCH MUCH smaller scale. possibly something that'll sit on my desk
a c 86 K Overclocking
May 2, 2010 8:43:47 PM

Don't split the loop. That is causing your problems. Too low flow rate. Splitting the loop doesn't help temps or anything else. Your pump is ONLY 3.3 GPM and thats with a non restricive hose and on level ground. I'm sure if you look up head pressure it can only raise the water 4-5 ft before your flow drops to ZERO.

Get rid of the split flow. Not seeing yor splitters, I bet they are of a very very restictive design, they also reduce flow.

Thats not much in evaporative cooling. I can garentee that the temp benefits is less than .1 C in water temps. It takes a LOT to create enough evap cooling to make a diff, and that teeny dribble isn't good for any cooling.

Read up on bongs for real evap cooling.

And that fancy monster would be neat. Imagine the dust it picks up from the air, and goes into a loop. Now, if your rad was in the bong water and it was fully seperate from the dirty bong water, then yes, they are viable.

May 2, 2010 8:58:40 PM

id think a waterfall that was like 4-5ft high would cool quite a bit. the only thing that makes the bong cooler any different is that it drips water down instead of pouring it down. more surface area for cooling in the bong but the waterfall in my opinion is much more attractive ^_^
a b K Overclocking
May 2, 2010 11:55:51 PM

Yes, the waterfall would look much better, and that would make upfor the cooling deficit over making a bong. Id just figure out something else to make up for it. I talked with my dad about it, and he said it would be a cinch to put together.

I could even make the bottom of the waterfall into the res so it flows right down into it.

My dad is contractor btw, and has made all sorts of odd things, so all my ideas run past him first to see how feasible it is.
a b K Overclocking
May 3, 2010 1:43:42 AM

Conumdrum said:
Don't split the loop. That is causing your problems. Too low flow rate.

I took your advice and redid the loop earlier today, making one continuous loop. The CPU sits at around 28-29C now, and the GPU now sits at 24C (ambient). Thank you for the suggestion, most people out there have told me to do two loops.
May 3, 2010 5:05:57 AM

As usual, Conundrum is right about the split loops. You can use separate loops if you have a pump for each loop or a pump with enough head that it can keep a high flow rate through both loops. As you have neither at the moment, you are better keeping your flow in as contiguous a loop as possible to minimize impingement and maximize flow.

Glycol alcohol does more than just act as a corrosion blocker. It can act as an anti-shearing agent, lowering the tension of the water, making it easier for the pump. One of the bad side effects of glycol alcohol is its tendency to "borrow" plasticizers from your PVC tubing, thus making them cloudy and eventually causing them become febrile.

If you are going to go with evaporative cooling, follow Conundrums suggestion. Create a heat exchange by immersing your radiator at the bottom of the waterfall and running the water from that enclosed loop through your computer. To keep the waterfall going, use an immersible aquarium pump. Instead of a single sheet of acrylic for the water to fall down, instead have several sheets that the water has to "step" down. Then all you need to do is add water and a capful of bleach to the
waterfall reservoir about once every other week. Every six months, clean the whole thing out.

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Like so
May 3, 2010 4:27:38 PM

if you're worried about crap getting into your system throw in a water filter ahhaha
a b K Overclocking
May 3, 2010 11:54:36 PM

Houndsteeth said:


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Like so

i think this would be the best way of getting the water cool
a b K Overclocking
May 4, 2010 3:24:03 AM

Houndsteeth said:
As usual, Conundrum is right about the split loops. You can use separate loops if you have a pump for each loop or a pump with enough head that it can keep a high flow rate through both loops. As you have neither at the moment, you are better keeping your flow in as contiguous a loop as possible to minimize impingement and maximize flow.

Glycol alcohol does more than just act as a corrosion blocker. It can act as an anti-shearing agent, lowering the tension of the water, making it easier for the pump. One of the bad side effects of glycol alcohol is its tendency to "borrow" plasticizers from your PVC tubing, thus making them cloudy and eventually causing them become febrile.

If you are going to go with evaporative cooling, follow Conundrums suggestion. Create a heat exchange by immersing your radiator at the bottom of the waterfall and running the water from that enclosed loop through your computer. To keep the waterfall going, use an immersible aquarium pump. Instead of a single sheet of acrylic for the water to fall down, instead have several sheets that the water has to "step" down. Then all you need to do is add water and a capful of bleach to the
waterfall reservoir about once every other week. Every six months, clean the whole thing out.

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Like so

I was thinking about the step thing, would give it more surface area to flow over.

overshocked has just told me he's got an evaporator from an AC system that I could use as the rad, can fit around 6 120mm fans, so it's pretty big. I'm wondering if I'll need a stronger pump for it, though. If I do, then I can use this pump I have for the waterfall. What thinks ye?
a c 86 K Overclocking
May 4, 2010 5:51:41 AM

Your into the custom side. You go with wat you have, make it work, have fun.

Outside my knoledge levels.
May 4, 2010 11:28:56 AM

jedimasterben said:
I was thinking about the step thing, would give it more surface area to flow over.

overshocked has just told me he's got an evaporator from an AC system that I could use as the rad, can fit around 6 120mm fans, so it's pretty big. I'm wondering if I'll need a stronger pump for it, though. If I do, then I can use this pump I have for the waterfall. What thinks ye?

The only issue, IIRC, with the evaporator is that the tubing is round, not flat-square, which will reduce your overall cooling potential. Turbid water will flow easier through round tubing inside the evaporator, which works great for a fluorocarbon, since it does its work by phase-changing, but not so good for water, where you aren't using an endothermic/exothermic change of state in order to shed heat, but are more reliant with actual physical contact witht he metal of the radiator to transfer the heat from the tubing, to the fins, and eventually out into the air. If you can, try and stick with what works for the most efficiency. If you can't, then go with what is available, just knowing that it might not give you the full potential, but could very well be more than enough for your needs since it is very big.
a b K Overclocking
May 4, 2010 12:43:58 PM

Houndsteeth said:
The only issue, IIRC, with the evaporator is that the tubing is round, not flat-square, which will reduce your overall cooling potential. Turbid water will flow easier through round tubing inside the evaporator, which works great for a fluorocarbon, since it does its work by phase-changing, but not so good for water, where you aren't using an endothermic/exothermic change of state in order to shed heat, but are more reliant with actual physical contact witht he metal of the radiator to transfer the heat from the tubing, to the fins, and eventually out into the air. If you can, try and stick with what works for the most efficiency. If you can't, then go with what is available, just knowing that it might not give you the full potential, but could very well be more than enough for your needs since it is very big.

Well, this is the honestly the best that I have readily available for a while (my bank failed and was bought out, and their computer systems glitched last night, so I'm gonna have between 50 and -980 dollars until they can figure out what is causing it, good thing I always keep some cash around for things like this).
I bought a small heater core last night to last until I could figure out something permanent, but I don't think it is large enough, and even my Thunderblade (80+ CFM) doesn't seem to pass much air through it. And the conversion to 5/8" tubing didn't help either, do you know how hard it is to try and convert 3/8" to 5/8" when no hardware store sells the proper connectors? I fought with that thing for an hour trying to figure out what I COULD do it. Drove me nuts. :pt1cable: 

Anyways, so even if it doesn't work to the evaporator's full potential, it's still large and may be worth a shot, and it's my best bet (free, :)  ) until my bank can work stuff out.

He sent me a pic of it last night:
a c 224 K Overclocking
May 4, 2010 6:34:01 PM

Quote:
Now, the water in my area is frighteningly sulfuric, and the aerator is what takes that out of the water. It pumps air into the water to make the sulfur stick to it and float to the top and evaporate out, and adding chlorine to it to kill the bacteria that make release the sulfur. I would have to stick the pump in the top of the aerator, which is the part with the the most chlorine and the most sulfur, so that pump would be dead after just a few weeks.


What do you do for drinking water?

Seems like that would be a serious problem and require a whole house water filtering system.

I'm still considering ArthurH's water cooling method myself and let the runoff fill our bird bath, but I'm presently @ 4Ghz on air cooling and that's enough for anything I'm doing right there, so you must have some serious overclock goals to go to this much trouble?

Impressive setup though!
a b K Overclocking
May 4, 2010 11:36:12 PM

4Ryan6 said:
What do you do for drinking water?

Seems like that would be a serious problem and require a whole house water filtering system.

I'm still considering ArthurH's water cooling method myself and let the runoff fill our bird bath, but I'm presently @ 4Ghz on air cooling and that's enough for anything I'm doing right there, so you must have some serious overclock goals to go to this much trouble?

Impressive setup though!

Yes, we have a nice system to clean up the water before it enters the house. A 300 gallon aerator tank cleans out the sulfur, a softener takes out the chlorine the aerator adds (among other minerals and such), and then another set of filters takes out most everything else. Water comes out both odorless and crystal clear on the other end of all that.

The only reason that I didn't do the outside to inside system is that I couldn't get a strong enough pump to run inside and through everything that doesn't require being fully submersed at all times, and the only feasible place is inside the top of the aerator. That tank takes the sulfur water and blows bubbles to attach to the sulfur so it floats to the top and evaporates with the air, and adds chlorine to kill the bacteria that release the sulfur. I'm pretty sure that the combination of the chlorine and sulfur all at the top of the tank would eat through any pump I put into it. On another note, if it were ever to spring a leak inside while I was at work or something, it would have an unlimited source of water, and could be kinda bad for my house (and my marriage, says my wife). :lol: 
a c 86 K Overclocking
May 5, 2010 3:10:57 AM

Hey jedi! Cudos to you and your fun times. You think, play, havin fun. Your a bit outside the box, but this is how watercooling started.

I'm hard on ya, but feel your time is well spent doing this.

Better than xboxing all night long, your dad must be proud.

My kids are grown and did their learning already.
a b K Overclocking
May 5, 2010 12:39:04 PM

Thanks! I know you were hard on me, but I knew that you must reply to hundreds and hundreds of "water cooling for a noob" threads, so it's ok.

This was more of an experiment than it was "set up the best watercooling system EVER", which is what I love to do. I got my hands on some liquid nitrogen and some pots made by oveshocked and did some extreme overclocking this past weekend, and it was tons of fun doing something new, especially trying to come up with a good mounting system and insulation for the board.

I try to keep my dad involved in these kinds of thing, not only because he' very knowledgeable about a wide variety of building/plumbing/repair, but since father-son time is good and fun for both of us. And he's just glad I'm doing something with my hands other than just playing on the computer, though I usually put off mowing my grass because of it, so now he always asks me if I've spotted any wild animals in the jungle around my house! :lol: 
May 6, 2010 9:51:09 AM

as a noob myself this thread was fun to read. I started laughing when I saw a 5 gallon water jug. lol
May 7, 2010 2:13:48 AM

theres nothing funny about a 5 gal reservoir...anyone with more then half a gal worth of WC loop is serious stuff!!! =P SERIOUS!!!
a c 86 K Overclocking
May 7, 2010 4:12:58 AM

i4yue said:
theres nothing funny about a 5 gal reservoir...anyone with more then half a gal worth of WC loop is serious stuff!!! =P SERIOUS!!!



Serious but sorely uninformed and lacking on how WC works. It's not about how many gallons, it's about having a clue about heatload and heat removal. And Flow rates, noise from fans, Head pressure from pumps, etc etc.

It's funny when all the info about watercooling is out there, and when someone jumps in headfirst and fails.

Take your time.
!