Tiny bubbles in cooling liquid.

Hello,
I have a crossfire powercolor liquid cooled 5870 setup. I use 2 separate loops for cooling each card, each loop has a laing ddc 18W pump, and a single 120mm radiator and a reservoir in the front slot. The coolant for both loops is the same, however the coolant in the loop for the card in position 0 has tiny bubbles which makes it opaque. I've tried all the regular things for getting rid bubbles and nothing seems to work.

- Is it in any way harmful or bad for cooling to have those bubbles?
- How do I get rid of them?
5 answers Last reply
More about tiny bubbles cooling liquid
  1. You probably need to bleed it more, how long has it been running with bubbles. You could have air in a rad if the barbs are at the bottom. You could have a micro leak at the inlet of the pump, under suction it could be pulling air, but then with the system off you should have a very very slow leak.

    Check your rad for a teeny puncture on a fin/tube from a screw. Hard to see those leaks and the rad can hold a small pool of liquid.

    If it has run for days and still bubbles check for rad air pockets first. Then on to other things.
  2. it has ran for almost 2 weeks now... how do i check for rad air pockets?
  3. As mentioned, the pump intakes need to be 100% submerged. Possibly if the outlet is dropping into the tank, it's creating bubbles so a diffuser would be needed. Another possibility, although unlikely, is cavatation from the pump going too fast and separating the fluid and damaging the pump, but you'd generally know from the excessive noise it makes. Anyway, air bubbles will reduce the cooling capacity but it probably won't break anything.

    I'd say rad holes or perhaps a weakly connected hose are the most likely culprits, but I don't know how to check for it... maybe run the pump in reverse to see if it leakes out (instead of sucking air in)... Not sure if that's possible on these systems tho. Sorry.
  4. wolfram23 said:
    As mentioned, the pump intakes need to be 100% submerged. Possibly if the outlet is dropping into the tank, it's creating bubbles so a diffuser would be needed. Another possibility, although unlikely, is cavatation from the pump going too fast and separating the fluid and damaging the pump, but you'd generally know from the excessive noise it makes. Anyway, air bubbles will reduce the cooling capacity but it probably won't break anything.

    I'd say rad holes or perhaps a weakly connected hose are the most likely culprits, but I don't know how to check for it... maybe run the pump in reverse to see if it leakes out (instead of sucking air in)... Not sure if that's possible on these systems tho. Sorry.



    Submerge a pump? What the heck pump are you talking about? How many WC rigs have you built?
  5. Conumdrum said:
    Submerge a pump? What the heck pump are you talking about? How many WC rigs have you built?

    *shifty eyes*

    I guess the pump just uses hoses, then... lol.
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