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Direct heatpipe flaws, cm 212 what should we do?

Last response: in Overclocking
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May 12, 2010 1:19:18 AM

Hello everyone, I am not looking for an exact answer but rather your opinions on this. It has been proven in the benchmarks that the direct heatpipes make for better cooling. But as i looked at the bottom of my cooler master 212 I see something, there are grooves like a ditch where each heatpipe meets the metal block (on the bottom). This must make for a lot of air and therefor much less efficient right? Should we use our trusty thermal paste and line these grooves? Am I missing something here? Is this what its supposed to be like? What would you do?
May 12, 2010 1:47:13 AM

I don't have the 212. I have the sunbeamtech ccf. It is very similar to the 212 in that it has those heatpipe grooves.

I used the spread method to apply a good coat of thermal onto the heatsink making sure to cover those grooved areas. Then I just used grain of rice size thermal on the cpu and smashed it with the heatsink. I get 28celsius idle and 55c prime 95 so I'm happy. 955black edition btw.
a b K Overclocking
May 12, 2010 2:45:53 AM

Yep, fill the grooves with thermal paste (and smooth with the back of a razor blade if you like). Then just a tiny bit more paste (like normal) and you're good to go!
May 12, 2010 2:55:48 AM

Hold on, Frostytech.com had something different to say about those grooves...

"The Cooler master Hyper 212 Plus heat sink has a pressed base with a surface roughness of approximately ~32 microinches. The base is flat in both axis. The creases between the copper heatpipes and aluminum form channels which help to evacuate excess thermal compound."

I may have to agree with that for a few reasons;
1) the pipes are about 80+% of the contact surface(coper will more than pull its weight) aluminum is maybe 15% leaving maybe 5% to take in excess paste(there is always excess)
2) being able to squeeze out to the center will allow a thinner & more uniform film thickness (better heat transfer)
3) I uses a lower CFM fan(15cfm lower)and even with the grooves it performed very close to the same level a the sunbeam which has not grooves (imagine if the fans were the same)

4)maybe it will keep the edges of your CPU die cleaner lol
a b K Overclocking
May 12, 2010 3:05:08 AM

Here is what HC had to say (also a great pictorial guide on how to install the cooler):

"
Arctic Cooling MX-2 thermal paste was used for all coolers during these tests unless otherwise noted. For all non HDT coolers, application of thermal paste was in accordance with TIM manufacturer’s instructions; and while not necessary, the TIM was allowed to cure for 24 hours under moderate to high loads (with periods of low loads) prior to testing.

For all 3 pipe HDT coolers two lines of TIM are applied to the two center metal posts and for all 4 pipe HDTS three (smaller) lines of TIM are applied to the metal posts. With this method it has been found to provide significantly better coverage than the more typical methods.
"

http://www.hardwarecanucks.com/forum/hardware-canucks-r...
May 12, 2010 3:19:09 AM

tuesday0180 said:
I don't have the 212. I have the sunbeamtech ccf. It is very similar to the 212 in that it has those heatpipe grooves.

I used the spread method to apply a good coat of thermal onto the heatsink making sure to cover those grooved areas. Then I just used grain of rice size thermal on the cpu and smashed it with the heatsink. I get 28celsius idle and 55c prime 95 so I'm happy. 955black edition btw.


FWW my 92mm sunbeam CCF is smooth and grooveless exept for the very corners where the cpu doesn't touch anyway.
a b K Overclocking
May 12, 2010 12:08:47 PM

Well, it is still one of the better ones, so it can't hurt too much. However, I don't think filling them is the critical part as much as perfectly applying the paste to the heatpipes, as they are what is really whisking the heat away. The method of filling the ridges does that.
!