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E8500 overheating

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March 14, 2009 3:32:27 PM

Hi all,
I'm building a new system, and it keeps shutting down a couple minutes after booting up due to the core getting too hot (108C or so then it auto-shuts down). It will overheat even when I'm just in the BIOS watching the core temp, where I can see it climb about 1C every second. I'm using the stock heat sink, defaults for all my BIOS settings, and all my fans are running. I've used both the thermal grease that comes with the heat sink, and cleaned it off with rubbing alcohol and tried putting on some myself (based on how it looked when I removed it I think I got a pretty nice thin film and a good contact), but it didn't effect the overheating at all. I've tried reseating the heat sink several times, each time it felt pretty solid, but again, it didn't help. Is it possible the chip is faulty in some manner and so it just running too hot?

Thanks a lot,
J

More about : e8500 overheating

a b à CPUs
March 14, 2009 6:01:09 PM

for someone to hel ypu diagnose your problems we need some specs on your pc.

Mobo
CPU
Ram
GPU
OS

etc etc
March 14, 2009 6:41:04 PM

Sorry, here are the specs.

DFI LP DK X48-T2RSB PLUS LGA 775 Intel Motherboard
Intel Core 2 Duo E8500 Wolfdale 3.16GHz LGA 775 65W CPU
XFX PVT98WYDFH GeForce 9800 GTX+ 512MB GPU
4GB (4x1GB) G.SKILL DDR2 1066 RAM

No OS as of yet, but plan on installing WinXP once it stays on long enough to do so.
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March 14, 2009 7:14:04 PM

jwrmad said:
Hi all,
I'm building a new system, and it keeps shutting down a couple minutes after booting up due to the core getting too hot (108C or so then it auto-shuts down). It will overheat even when I'm just in the BIOS watching the core temp, where I can see it climb about 1C every second. I'm using the stock heat sink, defaults for all my BIOS settings, and all my fans are running. I've used both the thermal grease that comes with the heat sink, and cleaned it off with rubbing alcohol and tried putting on some myself (based on how it looked when I removed it I think I got a pretty nice thin film and a good contact), but it didn't effect the overheating at all. I've tried reseating the heat sink several times, each time it felt pretty solid, but again, it didn't help. Is it possible the chip is faulty in some manner and so it just running too hot?

Thanks a lot,
J



Reapply thermal paste and reseat the heat sink. this is the only thing i can think of.
a c 345 à CPUs
March 14, 2009 7:22:02 PM

Push pin coolers can be tricky to install.
A bad installation can lead to higher temperatures, and even cpu throttling.
With the pc powered down, gently rock the cooler to see if it is on solid, or if it wobbles a bit.
Push pin coolers are best installed while the motherboard is outside of the case.
You need to be able to look at the back of the board to verify that
all 4 pins are completely through and locked.
Play with the pins on the cooler first, so you can see exactly how they work.
Read the instructions that came with your retail cpu.
When pushing down on the pins, do a diagonal pair first.
If you don't, it is hard to get the last pin in.
Don't forget to clean the parts and reapply fresh thermal compound every time.
Don't try to reuse the TIM.
Rubbing alcohol is OK as a cleaner.
I use a paper coffee filter to clean with because it is lint free.
Any name brand TIM should be OK(as-5, Mx-2, etc.)
When applying the TIM, don't use too much, because it can act as an insulator.
Don't apply too little, either, because it won't spread and fill the microscopic
imperfections in the surfaces. A dollop about the size of a grain
of rice should be about right.
March 14, 2009 9:24:25 PM

Thanks for the help, but I don't think the heat sink is the (primary) issue. I've tried putting the processor in another machine I have access to that has a bigger, more serious, heat sink, and it overheats there as well, while the processor from that machine does fine in the same environment. Also, when removing the heat sink right after operation (where the temperature nominally pushes 100C) and touching the heat spreader on the back of the chip, it doesn't feel even warm to the touch. While it could cool quickly after turning it off, the fact that it is overheating suggests it's not cooling that quickly, and from 100C to room temperature should take awhile. Is it possible the heating is very local and so not even reaching the heat spreader, or that the core temp sensor is somehow failing?
March 15, 2009 2:10:28 AM

Did you buy it from a small local business or a large chain? An unfortunate part of the CPU world is that small businesses will buy slower CPU's and overclock them to higher specs and resell them as a higher model to get the markup. You may have had that happen to you and stock cooling will never be enough. If you didn't... send it back... it's obviously faulty.
March 15, 2009 11:16:04 PM

I bought it from NewEgg, so I'm hopeful that it won't be too hard to have it replaced. Thanks a lot everyone!
!