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Turn Virtual Memory off with 8gb ram?

Last response: in Memory
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April 26, 2009 7:38:42 PM

Is it ever recommended to turn virtual memory off (for faster system performance)?
• With 8gb ddr2 ram, running XP64
What about:
• With 8gb ddr2 ram, running Vista64 with a fast 4gb ReadyBoost device?

[Usage includes gaming]
------------------ ------------------ ------------------ ------------------ ------------------ ------------------
Current setup (URL-linked for fast part look-up):
MSI P6N Diamond mainboard
-----• Chipset: NVIDIA® nForce 680i SLI SPP (C55XE), NVIDIA® nForce 570i SLI MCP (MCP55P)
-----• Slots: Four v1.0a PCI Express x16, One v1.0a PCI Express x1
-----• RAM: 8GB Dual-channel DDR2 800
• CPU: Intel Core2 6600@2.40GHz, overclocked to 3.37ghz
-----• Thermaltake Ultimate v1 CPU Cooler
• Hard disk: Four SATA II drives in RAID0 (nForce 590i SLI MCP)
• Graphics: One MSI 640mb GeForce 8800 gts (factory overclocked) --> upgrading this week to (GeForce 260/280/295)
• Monitors: Two 28" WUXGA LCD 1920x1200 (default resolution)
• Multimedia: SoundBlaster X-Fi Xtreme Audio
• Networking: Dual (Realtek RTL8211B) 1/2Gbps Fast Ethernet ports using LACP (IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation)
• Power supply: SilverStone Strider ST56F 560W Active PFC
• OS: 64bit XP SP3
April 26, 2009 7:58:02 PM

While thinking about this question I also am wondering about this scenario:
• Using a small-capacity SLC SSD exclusively for holding the windows swap file/virtual memory?
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April 26, 2009 9:56:53 PM

You cannot turn off virtual memory. You could disable the page file, but that is a waste of time.
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April 26, 2009 10:44:58 PM

theAnimal said:
You cannot turn off virtual memory. You could disable the page file, but that is a waste of time.


In layman's terms, virtual memory is the pagefile. The settings tab in Windows also calls it virtual memory.
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April 26, 2009 11:38:58 PM

nah leave it on - iv seen some games love a ~12gb page file with my 8gb of ram (stops crashes etc)
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April 26, 2009 11:39:09 PM

rkaye said:
Is it ever recommended to turn virtual memory off (for faster system performance)?
• With 8gb ddr2 ram, running XP64
What about:
• With 8gb ddr2 ram, running Vista64 with a fast 4gb ReadyBoost device?

[Usage includes gaming]
------------------ ------------------ ------------------ ------------------ ------------------ ------------------
Current setup (URL-linked for fast part look-up):
MSI P6N Diamond mainboard
-----• Chipset: NVIDIA® nForce 680i SLI SPP (C55XE), NVIDIA® nForce 570i SLI MCP (MCP55P)
-----• Slots: Four v1.0a PCI Express x16, One v1.0a PCI Express x1
-----• RAM: 8GB Dual-channel DDR2 800
• CPU: Intel Core2 6600@2.40GHz, overclocked to 3.37ghz
-----• Thermaltake Ultimate v1 CPU Cooler
• Hard disk: Four SATA II drives in RAID0 (nForce 590i SLI MCP)
• Graphics: One MSI 640mb GeForce 8800 gts (factory overclocked) --> upgrading this week to (GeForce 260/280/295)
• Monitors: Two 28" WUXGA LCD 1920x1200 (default resolution)
• Multimedia: SoundBlaster X-Fi Xtreme Audio
• Networking: Dual (Realtek RTL8211B) 1/2Gbps Fast Ethernet ports using LACP (IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation)
• Power supply: SilverStone Strider ST56F 560W Active PFC
• OS: 64bit XP SP3











Yor question was answered in your other thread. How many times to you got to ask before you listen to someone who knows from experience.
Pagefile is only required on 2G or less ram, anything over 2G turn it off.
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April 27, 2009 3:19:20 AM

daship said:
Yor question was answered in your other thread. How many times to you got to ask before you listen to someone who knows from experience.
Pagefile is only required on 2G or less ram, anything over 2G turn it off.


There are applications which require a page file, so one may be created even if disabled. There is no performance benefit to disabling it.
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April 27, 2009 5:10:22 AM

you turn pagefile off with 4gb and your gonna have problems, if your hurting for hard drive space, just buy a bigger new one.
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April 27, 2009 5:36:19 AM

theAnimal said:
There are applications which require a page file, so one may be created even if disabled. There is no performance benefit to disabling it.


Can you name one?

Applications cannot talk to the pagefile, so as long as there is enough free ram ...
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April 27, 2009 5:42:06 AM

Sorry none come to my mind right now but I have run aross some games that will no start w/o a page file. I suspect it because many games are still not 64 bit. I wanna say it was company or heroes or F.E.A.R
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April 27, 2009 6:12:51 AM

Even if you want to use a page file you dont need some fast disk. A 4G thumb drive would work perfect, I use a 4G SD card in my netbook for pagefile and a ssd for os and apps
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April 27, 2009 6:25:32 AM

PsyKhiqZero said:
but I have run aross some games that will no start w/o a page file. I suspect it because many games are still not 64 bit. I wanna say it was company or heroes or F.E.A.R


That must have been because you were low on ram. They can run fine without a pagefile.

An application just allocates a chunk of memory. The application doesn't know whether a chunk of memory is mapped to physical ram or the pagefile (it can request it to always be in physical ram, though). The pagefile is internal to the memory manager.
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Best solution

a b } Memory
April 27, 2009 12:50:35 PM

Leave your page file alone.
Changing it or turning it off does nothing to improve performance. This was an old trick way back in the Win 95/98 days when it would have cost you thousands of dollars to buy a couple gig of memory. If you could afford it, then turning it off was supposed to help some, as Windows didn't manage memory, processor usage, or the pagefile as well as it does now. It was also a fact that hard drives were mud slogging slow compared to todays drives. All this no longer pertains or makes any sense if you are running Windows XP or later, and halfway modern hardware.
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April 27, 2009 7:23:52 PM

mikrev007 said:
Can you name one?

Applications cannot talk to the pagefile, so as long as there is enough free ram ...


Photoshop.
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April 27, 2009 7:28:58 PM

theAnimal said:
Photoshop.

Well, I can tell you that photoshop works just fine without a pagefile.
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April 29, 2009 12:50:42 PM

jitpublisher said:
Leave your page file alone.
Changing it or turning it off does nothing to improve performance. This was an old trick way back in the Win 95/98 days when it would have cost you thousands of dollars to buy a couple gig of memory. If you could afford it, then turning it off was supposed to help some, as Windows didn't manage memory, processor usage, or the pagefile as well as it does now. It was also a fact that hard drives were mud slogging slow compared to todays drives. All this no longer pertains or makes any sense if you are running Windows XP or later, and halfway modern hardware.


Ah, this is exactly the answer I was looking for, thanks.
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April 4, 2012 9:52:41 PM

There is a smarter move.

Some programs do use VM irrespective of the amount of available RAM.

What I've done with my 12GB of RAM is to create a RAM disk that is 4GB big, and allocate a 4GB pagefile to that drive. This way, come what may all files are loaded into RAM, and my hard drives aren't needed at all.
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April 23, 2012 4:12:22 PM

no you will not be able to turn off the virtual memory off
it is becouse of the fact that microsoft keeps records of error occoured during the normal running of winXP/7 whatver on virtual memory
in case if the system shutsdwn completely you will loode all the records from the ram
micosoft has an idea
they keep records on virtual memory
in case of failure they will retrive it from the hdd itself

all you can do is to keep it low or turn of from control pannel
but it will be running in background

hope you like

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Anonymous
a b } Memory
August 26, 2012 12:42:36 AM

You're talking *** man.
I've always turned virtual memory off
even on a 1g memory computers.
I've always tested , it's lighter and faster.
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March 25, 2013 7:41:33 PM

Virtual memory is not the page file, virtual memory is the combination of real memory and the page file.. See memory is cut up into pieces called pages, the size of the page is usually about 4 kilobytes, and so for 8 gigabytes of memory you have about 250,000 of these pages on disk, at least.. And when a page hasn't been referenced in memory, it is swapped out to the pagefile. pages move from disk, to ram, to cpu cache, to cpu internal memory, based on how often they are used.. Least used pages are sent to disk, pages that the system predicts will be needed soon may be loaded into real memory from the pagefile.. You will notice when killing a program it takes a while for the memory to be freed up, that's the system releasing pages that are no longer in use. IF you have a very large cache of real memory, there is no point in having virtual memory turned on, cause almost nothing will be cached out, unless the paging algorithm is excessively frugal. Your virtual memory is at most the real memory plus page file size, but at least the amount of real memory. To be safe the page file should be about 1.5 times the amount of real memory, at least this is what I do for swap space on linux, because if there is not enough swap to swap out the real memory to disk, then your programs will crash due to insufficient storage, in windows you have no control over the pagefile size but in Linux you do.. I guess on windows the page file is variable size, on my machine it is showing about 9.5 gigs and I have 8 gigs of memory. A page fault occurs when the desired page is not in real memory and it has to be loaded from disk.. Thrashing occurs when you have insufficient real memory and pages are constantly being swapped out to the page file, this is why increasing memory is a significant performance boost. And as others have said, virtual memory was really a big deal in the old days when memory was costly and running programs like photoshop that would require gigs of memory to load in large photos, but where only parts of the photo were being seen at once, permitted the unseen/unused parts of the photo to be stored in the disk until they were needing to being seen. Virtual memory also permitted people on system like Unix and Linux to be able to use the same machine without utilizing all the resources on the machine, by cutting up memory into pieces for each user and limiting each users real memory use by some quota.

IT would make sense for those who have SSD's to turn virtual memory off because the life of the disk is determined by the number of writes that are made to disk, and SSD's efficiency deteriorates over time based upon how much data is rewritten.. Relocating the page file to a hard disk may increase the service life of the SSD.
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March 25, 2013 8:07:32 PM

tfn105 said:
There is a smarter move.

Some programs do use VM irrespective of the amount of available RAM.

What I've done with my 12GB of RAM is to create a RAM disk that is 4GB big, and allocate a 4GB pagefile to that drive. This way, come what may all files are loaded into RAM, and my hard drives aren't needed at all.


This would be better than reducing the virtual memory or turning it off.. You can get hardware that permits you to add real memory without utilizing system memory, by having it disguised as hard drive space.. Then copy the pagefile to that.. I don't recall if it retains the stored data, because that would mean it would have to keep memory refreshed even after the computer was turned off.. Also, system restore relies on swap space I think, so that when a machine is put into hibernation, software state is copied to the swap, and the machine is turned off..

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April 2, 2013 12:50:03 PM

You will notice that EVERY person who says it does not work has never tried it, and EVERY person who has tried it says it does work.

It does work, it will improve your system performance, it will not void your warranty, and it will not cause kernel panics.

sudo launchctl unload -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.dynamic_pager.plist

Ha ha! Okay, that's how you do it on Mac OS X

But all the same is true for windows. Disable your paging file to increase performance.
The second best performance enhancement is to change the Windows theme to "Windows Classic".

These two tips will turn a Windows dog into a good usable computer again.
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