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Q6600 Cooler help

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March 14, 2009 9:31:20 PM

i put my system together and booted it up only to find my cpu temps 80 degrees celsius.
i made sure the cooler was on right and everything but it still runs at 70 degrees plus.
can i install a aftermarket cooler with out taking my computer apart?
also which one would be best.
and if i cant do it with everything installed do you have any advice to cool it down

More about : q6600 cooler

March 14, 2009 9:39:32 PM

first of all, if your cpu burns out you can doa and get a new one, so no wories :) 
if you were planning to get an after market cooler anyway just play it safe and get one.
what are your cpu voltages in the bios?
if you are absoutely sure you got the heatsink on correctly, have thermal paste, the cpu fan spins when you turn it on, and the voltages are correct, then it necessarily must be your sensors causing the problem.
March 14, 2009 9:44:59 PM

cheepstuff said:
first of all, if your cpu burns out you can doa and get a new one, so no wories :) 
if you were planning to get an after market cooler anyway just play it safe and get one.
what are your cpu voltages in the bios?
if you are absoutely sure you got the heatsink on correctly, have thermal paste, the cpu fan spins when you turn it on, and the voltages are correct, then it necessarily must be your sensors causing the problem.


i think its on auto.... voltage.
but they were like varying.
well the fans spin. the pins are all the way down on the cooler but the paste was preapplied but i might have smudged it a bit on the cooler but does that matter?
what should my voltages?
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March 14, 2009 9:47:06 PM

if u gety a cooler that uses push pins (there are some very good ones such as the xigmintech s1283) u wont have to install a mobo backplate
March 14, 2009 9:48:43 PM

That's way too hot even with the stock heatsink, mine has the stock cooler and runs around 35-40 celcius overclocked at 2.8Ghz.
I would double check the heatsink to make sure the pegs are set through the board properly because I had to fix mine when I found it was running around 60.
March 14, 2009 10:07:01 PM

your voltage will vary with processor, but for 45-65nm tecknowledgy, it should stay well below 1.30V at stock
March 15, 2009 12:25:49 AM

You did remember to take the bit of plastic off the bottom of the heatsink before you put it on right? I know some people that didn't...
March 15, 2009 2:20:28 PM

Kraynor and mamw93 are both right. how new are you to computers? how much experience have you had with building systems?
March 15, 2009 8:30:39 PM

cheepstuff said:
Kraynor and mamw93 are both right. how new are you to computers? how much experience have you had with building systems?

this is my first build but i did take the plastic off the bottom. i took my cooler off and reset it... everything is on right...
i did notice if i pressed on the heatsink when it was running temps would drop from ~65 to about 60.'
could it be a bad cooler contact plate?
should i get new thermal paste?
March 15, 2009 8:49:17 PM

niquem said:
this is my first build but i did take the plastic off the bottom. i took my cooler off and reset it... everything is on right...
i did notice if i pressed on the heatsink when it was running temps would drop from ~65 to about 60.'
could it be a bad cooler contact plate?
should i get new thermal paste?

the best thermal paste is arctic silver but that shouldn't be the problem. I also have a Q6600 that I overclocked to 3gHz with the stock cooling and stock thermal paste. It is sounding like your misreading your temps as Fahrenheit and not Celsius. A computer wouldn't run for very long if it idled at 80 Celsius.
March 15, 2009 9:14:59 PM

mamw93 said:
the best thermal paste is arctic silver but that shouldn't be the problem. I also have a Q6600 that I overclocked to 3gHz with the stock cooling and stock thermal paste. It is sounding like your misreading your temps as Fahrenheit and not Celsius. A computer wouldn't run for very long if it idled at 80 Celsius.

Its no longer idling at 80.
its now idling at more like 50-60 celsius.
I took the cooler off for a second to look at it and it seems as if the contact area is concaved.
the thermal material is smudged in a circle but in the middle it is noticably less smudged.
like i said the more pressure i put on it made the temps go down.
should i perhaps try lapping the contact plate and get new thermal paste?
or should i try to run it for a few weeks
March 15, 2009 9:29:24 PM

if the contact point is concave then you need a new cooler.
March 15, 2009 10:08:54 PM

mamw93 said:
if the contact point is concave then you need a new cooler.

well could i attempt to lap the cooler or would that be a bad idea?

March 15, 2009 10:23:59 PM

It would be bad cause you still wouldn't make a good enough contact. If you are still within warranty call up Intel or AMD and tell them to ship you out a new stock cooler for your processor. If you are out of warranty then go to Tigerdirect.com or CompUSA.com and they have great CPU coolers. but also get some Arctic Silver thermal paste, it's the best out there.
March 16, 2009 2:30:15 AM

Triple check the cooler and quadruple check the push pins. Believe me I would give 90% of the chances that it's not installed properly.
I've assembled about 7 computers now and made an extremely stupid mistake installing the cooler on the last one (and another two in between).
My experience says that when it comes to installing the cooler, temps that high with a good working fan are only possible with an improperly installed heat sink, and pushpins being the reason most of the time.
Don't trust yourself on this one, believe you did something wrong, look for any details. It won't mean you're stupid, the design is too tricky.
March 16, 2009 2:56:35 AM

If you wind up buying a new cooler, nab yourself a bolt-through one instead of one that uses pushpins, much easier to connect ;) 
March 16, 2009 4:25:12 AM

There is no question that your HS is not properly installed, no question at all. I don't care if you think it is, I can tell you that it is not. Don't get a cooler with the same junk push pin design that isn't working on the stock one, that's just stupid. Take the time to remove the mobo and do it right.

If your case has the clearance you can get the XIGMATEK Dark Knight-S1283V, it works very well.

When applying thermal paste with the Xigmatek cooler, apply a thin layer across the CPU IHS (top) or across the whole base of the heatsink. The paste won't spread properly through contact because of the gaps between the heatpipes and the base.
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March 16, 2009 1:45:16 PM

The only way to be certain that pushpin style HSF's are installed properly is to install the heatsink before the motherboard is installed.
March 16, 2009 2:10:37 PM

Same can be said for all HSFs, since you can't exactly get on backplate ones without taking the motherboard out either ;) 

Best thing to do is this:
Take out your motherboard
Make sure all the pins are in properly
Set it on a non-conductive surface, I find the box the motherboard came in to work just fine
Connect everything up (with the motherboard out of the case)
Start it up and check temps
If they're in the 30-40 region at idle, and 40-55 under load, job done. Those temps are about right for a B3 Q6600, yours might be a G0 which would be cooler.
March 16, 2009 8:14:07 PM

Kraynor said:
Same can be said for all HSFs, since you can't exactly get on backplate ones without taking the motherboard out either ;) 
That is true, but you can be sure it won't loosen up in six months and cook the CPU before you know what's happening. Of course you could just spend all your time monitoring the temps looking for the failure.

I did hear about a guy that cut a hole in his mobo tray so he could get to it without removing the mobo. :lol: 

That's too much like work IMO. It only takes a few minutes to remove a mobo, let us not be lazy.
!