Sign-in / Sign-up
Your question
Solved

Sata 6.0 card Confusion

Tags:
  • Hard Drives
  • Asus
  • SATA
  • Rampage
  • Storage
  • Product
Last response: in Storage
June 7, 2010 3:32:33 PM

I have a ASUS Rampage II GENE and I was looking into adding a Sata 6.0 card such as the ASUS Model U3S6 USB 3.0 & SATA 6Gb/s Add-on card. I'm confused, does this card have to be inserted into a pci 16x slot? I currently don't have crossfired gpu cards but I would like to keep that option open for the future.

Also maybe a general question about Sata 6.0, is there going to be enough of a difference between 6.0 and 3.0 or should I just simplify and get a 3.0?



ASUS Rampage II GENE - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

ASUS Model U3S6 USB 3.0 & SATA 6Gb/s Add-on card - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Western Digital Caviar Black - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

More about : sata card confusion

Best solution

a c 127 G Storage
June 7, 2010 4:22:04 PM

I think that's a PCI-express x1 (500MB/s) card; or x4 max; no more.

SATA 6Gbps is only needed for faster SSDs that come out christmas this year; the only 6Gbps SSD at the moment (Crucial C300) manages to only reach 350MB/s of sequential reads; so only barely use the maximum 600MB/s throughput possible with Serial ATA 6Gbps.

Your onboard SATA 3Gbps controller embedded in the chipset is likely the fastest for your SSD, as it has the lowest latency and is closest to your CPU. Therefore, i recommend you settle on 3Gbps onboard SATA instead.

HDDs that have 6Gbps SATA would sell very well due to it being great marketing, but technically, the added bandwidth would be wasted. It would be like driving at a road where you are allowed to drive 600 km/h but your truck can only achieve 100 km/h max and only when it doesn't have to take any turns. That basically explains it quite well i think.

So skip the 6Gbps SATA for now; but USB3 could be really useful for an external harddrive (if you have no external SATA or eSATA) or for faster flash pendrives that can use the high USB3 bandwidth. So if i were to choose, i would choose USB3 as extra feature instead, and install it to a PCI-express x1 slot, so you keep both x16 slots free for your crossfire setup.

:) 
Share
June 7, 2010 4:41:14 PM

Thank you very much, that will help keep cost down as well.
m
0
l
Related resources
June 7, 2010 4:41:29 PM

Best answer selected by cryzr.
m
0
l
September 5, 2010 4:06:32 PM

cryzr said:
Thank you very much, that will help keep cost down as well.

n
n
cryzr said:
Thank you very much, that will help keep cost down as well.

n
n
cryzr said:
Best answer selected by cryzr.

n
nOk so I know this thread is a bit old, but I read this and figured I'd offer my experience with this very same scenario. I would take a different angle on this debate. First of all, the Asus AS36 controller is definitely a PCI-e x4 device (not a single lane x1 device), and therefore supports a max transfer rate of 20Gb/s (e.g. more than 3 times the speed of SATA III 6Gbps). This is likely overkill as most wouldn't need all that bandwidth for one add-in card. But let's explore this a bit more.
n
nI have the Asus Rampage Extreme (first generation), and the AS36 add-in card is NOT compatible with my system. If it were, I would absolutely consider sacrificing my PCI-e 2.0 x16 slot for it, if I had a drive that could realistically take advantage of the bandwidth. My board has two x16 and four x1 slots. My GeForce GTX280 is consuming one of the x16 slots so my only choice for an x4 SATA III controller would be the other x16 slot.
n
nAlthough it was not supported, I actually picked up the AS36 card, and tested it out. It was recognized fine by my system and the drivers loaded fine into Windows - I was able to boot to my Crucial C300 256GB SSD card just fine, and it was running at it's full potential. However, the OS locked up three times in 20 minutes so I had to rip it out and installed a StarTech PEXSAT32 PCI-e x1 card instead.
n
nThe cost of these cards are very reasonable. The Asus AS36 is the better of the two - it runs with 4 PCI-e lanes to permit the highest possible transfer rate for your drive, and you get two external USB 3.0 ports in addition to the two internal SATA III ports. Asus was also kind enough to provide two SATA III cables as well so you don't need to buy anything but the AS36 kit to get your hard drive cranking. All of this for only $25 too (on NewEgg)! Seems like a great deal to me, but again it's only an option if your board is supported/listed in the the Asus compatibility chart.
n
nThe StarTech PEXSAT32 card has some drawbacks over the Asus, as it only runs over 1 PCI-e lane, which maxes out a 5Gbps. In addition the card has no USB 3.0 ports and comes with no cables at all. Now granted the StarTech card only runs at 5Gbps (500MB/s), but even the fastest drives on the market today don't quite hit that kind of throughput. I actually purchased the PEXSAT32, and my drive's read throughput increased dramatically. I went from 199MB/s read performance over onboard SATA II (3Gbps or 300MB/s), to 350MB/ms read performance over the StarTech SATA III card. That's a 75% increase in read throughput. The StarTech PEXSAT32 PCI-e x1 add-in card costs about $55 at NewEgg, which to me feels like a shame - as you get less than you do with the Asus package for twice the price.
n
nNevertheless, if you have an SSD or a drive that can easily push past the SATA II (300MB/s) limitation, then you're doing yourself a disservice by running it on anything other than a SATA III card. You don't necessarily have to give up your PCI-e 2.0 x16 slot either, unless you plan on running a bunch of drives on the card and need all the bandwidth you can get. For scenarios where you're running a fast SSD or other hard drive, you can see that upgrading the a SATA III card will help unlock the speed of your system. I don't know the throughput numbers on that Caviar Black so make sure you read up on that before making your decision (if you haven't made on already).
n
nI have my OS installed on the SSD, and when I reran my Windows Experience Index score, my primary disk transfer rate jumped from 6.8 to 7.9 after upgrading to the StarTech PEXSAT32 SATA III controller. Basically I maxed out Windows disk score... but the real proof is in the pudding. When I launch any application or program on my C300 256GB C300 C: drive - any program launches in less than 2 seconds. It's far more responsive over SATA III.
n
nI can't recommend or speak to running SSDs in RAID configurations on these add-in cards, but I can say that my system has GREATLY benefited from the addition of a SATA III controller. Again, it is absolutely vital that you have a drive which can utilize the extra throughput... and one more point - regarding how the C300's max read rate of 355MB/s is considered barely enough to tap into the SATA III (e.g. 600MB/s) standard... all I can say is if you go to the Crucial website you can clearly see that even though SATA II supports 300MB/s, the C300 can only achieve 265MB/s max on that transfer technology. Yet when connected to a SATA III 600MB/s controller, you can squeeze out at least a 33% increase in read performance. I actually got a 75% increase. The point is to really just do some math and if it looks like you will get a nice performance increase feel free to give it a go.
n
nFinal food for thought - the beauty of NewEgg is that you can buy these things, try them out, benchmark them, and if you aren't happy, most of the time you can return the item. I'd say it's worth looking into, based on my experience upgrading to SATA III. Don't just rule it out because you think it will be overkill for your system.
n
nHope this helps...
m
0
l