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Win xp with SP3 only reads 131 GB of the new 250 GB HD

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June 8, 2010 4:42:08 PM

win xp with SP3 only reads 131 GB of the new 250 GB HD

I need some advice. I have Win XP with SP 1, 2, and 3 installed and try to upgrade from a 40 GB HD to a 250 GB HD in my labtop. After cloning, the new HD only reads a max of 131 GB. With SP3 already installed, I don't know why and my Disk Manager does not show any additional unallocated HD space left.

Any advice?

More about : win sp3 reads 131 250

a c 361 G Storage
June 8, 2010 6:34:24 PM

131 GB is an odd number. The limit from lack of 48-bit LBA Support in Original XP (no limit from SP1 on) is 128 GB. Anyway, maybe give us a few answers to help.

You say "Disk Manager does not show any additional unallocated HD space left." Are you using Disk Management and looking at the 250 GB unit in its LOWER RIGHT pane? Does that display actually show you one Partition called C: that is 128 GB, plus NO area called "Unallocated Space"? Or, are you looking at My Computer to see the drive? Or, are you looking at the UPPER RIGHT pane of Disk Management - that area will NOT show you Unallocated Space?

How did you clone from 40 GB to 250 GB? Did you connect both drives to one machine (your laptop, most likely) and INSTALL the cloning software on the 40 GB hard drive to run it? Or, did you run the cloning software from a bootable CD? I found when I used Seagate's Disk Wizard software a few years ago that, when run from its CD, it cannot figure out what version of the OS you already have and it refuses to create a Partition on the Destination drive larger than 128 GB - just to protect you from creating a hard disk Partition your (possibly older) OS cannot use. I had to install it on the C: drive first so it could recognize that I had Win XP SP2 and did not need to protect me.

There's another obscure thing that could cause this. I know Seagate drives have this feature, and probably a few others do, too. If you use Seagate's diagnostic software package Seatools on a Seagate drive, one tool allows you to set a parameter on the drive itself to make it behave like a drive with less than its full capacity - you actually have to enter the right number of Logical Blocks. From then on the unit always tells you it has that capacity. (Seatools also has a tool to restore to full capacity later.) If someone used this feature to limit the drive's size for whatever reason, that could explain why a 250 GB unit reports itself as 131 GB.
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June 8, 2010 8:29:31 PM

Paperdoc said:
131 GB is an odd number. The limit from lack of 48-bit LBA Support in Original XP (no limit from SP1 on) is 128 GB. Anyway, maybe give us a few answers to help.

You say "Disk Manager does not show any additional unallocated HD space left." Are you using Disk Management and looking at the 250 GB unit in its LOWER RIGHT pane? Does that display actually show you one Partition called C: that is 128 GB, plus NO area called "Unallocated Space"? Or, are you looking at My Computer to see the drive? Or, are you looking at the UPPER RIGHT pane of Disk Management - that area will NOT show you Unallocated Space?

How did you clone from 40 GB to 250 GB? Did you connect both drives to one machine (your laptop, most likely) and INSTALL the cloning software on the 40 GB hard drive to run it? Or, did you run the cloning software from a bootable CD? I found when I used Seagate's Disk Wizard software a few years ago that, when run from its CD, it cannot figure out what version of the OS you already have and it refuses to create a Partition on the Destination drive larger than 128 GB - just to protect you from creating a hard disk Partition your (possibly older) OS cannot use. I had to install it on the C: drive first so it could recognize that I had Win XP SP2 and did not need to protect me.

There's another obscure thing that could cause this. I know Seagate drives have this feature, and probably a few others do, too. If you use Seagate's diagnostic software package Seatools on a Seagate drive, one tool allows you to set a parameter on the drive itself to make it behave like a drive with less than its full capacity - you actually have to enter the right number of Logical Blocks. From then on the unit always tells you it has that capacity. (Seatools also has a tool to restore to full capacity later.) If someone used this feature to limit the drive's size for whatever reason, that could explain why a 250 GB unit reports itself as 131 GB.


Thanks for your response.
The new cloned (250 GB HD) on my ACER Aspire 3000 series labtop has the following partitions: SQSERVICE (approx. 3 GB), C-partition (64 GB), and D-partition (64 GB).

I have tried to clone this drive multiple ways. I bought a HD upgrade kit from Apricorn with a HD housing (later to be used for the old HD as a spare HD) and their EZ Gig II software (also tried their newest EZ Gig III version) with the same result. I also used WD version of Acronics True Image and xxclone with no different results.

Initially I installed the software on my C-drive, had the new HD connected through the kit and USB port, to clone the data from the old HD in my labtop to the new HD. Regardless what version I used it always produced the new HD when connected through USB with all C- and D-drive (both approx 110 GB in size) plus the SQSERVICE partition addition to the approx. 250 GB. When installing this drive into the labtp, the labtop did not recognize the D-drive anymore. I tried to open it with explorer and the computer suggested to format the drive, which did not work. I tried to delete the logical partition, but could not re-establish a new partition. Whatever I tried, the computer only recognized the c-drive with the 110 GB.

Then I installed the software on a bootable CD, installed the new HD into the labtop, connected the old HD via HD kit and USB, started the program via boot CD, and cloned the HD that way. This produced the new HD with the following partitions: SQSERVICE (approx. 3 GB), C-partition (64 GB), and D-partition (64 GB). However, I still only get approx. 131 GB out of my new 250 GB.

I read a lot about Win XP SP1, SP2, and SP3, which I have installed but that does not seem to make a difference.

Any thoughts or advice?


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a c 361 G Storage
June 9, 2010 7:34:49 PM

I think I recognize what has happened, now that you have given details of the three Partitions. Some cloning utilities (I know that Acronis True Image WD Edition does this) have a default way of cloning one HDD to another of much larger size. They call it Proportional Partitioning. It examines the sizes of all the Partitions on the original Source Disk, then looks at the total size of the Destination Disk and tries to create the new Partitions in sizes of approximately the same proportions. My guess is that your 40 GB original HDD had on it an "almost hidden" small Partition to be used for recovery purposes after a disk corruption problem, placed there by the laptop manufacturer, plus two other larger Partitions containing the OS and data. So when you made your clone copy to the 250 GB unit, the cloning software tried to proportion these and made the three Partitions you got. However, somehow it did not use the entire new 250 GB of space.

There is another way to use the cloning software, but you have to intervene using its menus and change the way this job is done. This means you will have to re-make the clone to the 250 GB unit. But before you start, decide whether you want to continue the strategy of having (in addition to the small recovery Partition) two different Partitions - one called C: for the OS and another called D:. You could opt to maintain that, with the two Partitions the same size; or, you could keep two Partitions but make them different sizes. If you want to combine both Partitions into one, that can be done but will take a bit more work.

One further consideration: in this case, the recovery Partition called SQSERVICE, when created on the new HDD unit, does not really need to be made larger than it is. It only has to hold what it has already on the 40 GB unit. So ideally your clone on the new drive will be only marginally larger (to allow for a bit more slack space in it) than it already is on the 40 GB original drive.

So, you connect both drives to your laptop and use the Acronis True Image WD Edition package to re-do the cloning operation. Ideally it ought to be installed on your old C: drive and run from there. First step is to identify the Source and Destination Drives, and make sure that's right - the DESTINATION drive's contents will be destroyed! Next you find the place where you can Delete ALL of the Partitions on the DESTINATION drive. Then you get into setting up the cloning operation.

If at all possible, read the software manual ahead of time for this, so you know where to start looking for alternative menus. It will show you the Partition structure it finds on the SOURCE Disk and how it proposes to create the new disk's structure by default. NOTE: right here is where you should note down the sizes of the three Partitions on the old 40 GB HDD, because you will need that info to make the adjustment I propose. You need to find the way to another menu that allows you to manually specify the Partition details on the DESTINATION unit. The small recovery Partition only needs to be a little larger than the original. The second Partition, which WILL be your BOOT Partition and hence must be bootable, should have its size set as you wish - much larger than 64 GB. (See my note below on how to combine after.) (See also my last note on a small OS-only Partition some people prefer.) The third Partition can be a size you set also, whether it matches the C: Partition or not. Ideally you want to have the full 250 GB used in total. Once this is all set up you can have it do the cloning. When you're done you should have a Partition structure as you specified, and the new HDD ought to be able to fully function as your boot drive (via the C: "drive" Partition) without the old 40 GB unit in the machine.

Now, just suppose that you want to move all your applications and data to one large C: drive, rather than having it on a separate D: drive. I really doubt you can do that in one step during the cloning. However, you could arrange those Partitions so that the D: drive created is only just big enough to hold all the files from the old one on the 40 GB unit, and have the C: Partition created to take up the major portion of the new HDD. AFTER the whole cloning thing is complete and working, you could then COPY all the contents of the D: drive to the C: drive. Then you use Windows Disk Management to Delete that D: Partition from the 250 GB HDD unit, making it just Unallocated Space. However, the next step it tricky. What we'd like to do is add that Unallocated Space to the C: Partition to make it larger. BUT Windows XP will not do that when the boot Partition is involved. You need some third party software to expand the boot Partition - Partition Manager is one, but you have to pay for it.

There may be another way you want to lay out your Partitions. Some people like to make a somewhat smaller Partition (like 20 GB or whatever is right) on which their OS is installed, and not much else. The remainder of the HDD unit is one larger Partition that contains all applications and data files. The argument for this is that, if the OS becomes corrupted, it is relatively easy to re-install that OS on that same Partition without touching the other Partitions, so you don't lose all your data. If you want to follow this model, just set up the cloning software so that the C: (boot) Partition it creates is about the same size as it is now on the old 40 GB unit (maybe 5 GB larger), and then use all the rest of the 250 GB unit for the D: Partition.
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June 9, 2010 8:50:20 PM

Paperdoc said:
I think I recognize what has happened, now that you have given details of the three Partitions. Some cloning utilities (I know that Acronis True Image WD Edition does this) have a default way of cloning one HDD to another of much larger size. They call it Proportional Partitioning. It examines the sizes of all the Partitions on the original Source Disk, then looks at the total size of the Destination Disk and tries to create the new Partitions in sizes of approximately the same proportions. My guess is that your 40 GB original HDD had on it an "almost hidden" small Partition to be used for recovery purposes after a disk corruption problem, placed there by the laptop manufacturer, plus two other larger Partitions containing the OS and data. So when you made your clone copy to the 250 GB unit, the cloning software tried to proportion these and made the three Partitions you got. However, somehow it did not use the entire new 250 GB of space.

There is another way to use the cloning software, but you have to intervene using its menus and change the way this job is done. This means you will have to re-make the clone to the 250 GB unit. But before you start, decide whether you want to continue the strategy of having (in addition to the small recovery Partition) two different Partitions - one called C: for the OS and another called D:. You could opt to maintain that, with the two Partitions the same size; or, you could keep two Partitions but make them different sizes. If you want to combine both Partitions into one, that can be done but will take a bit more work.

One further consideration: in this case, the recovery Partition called SQSERVICE, when created on the new HDD unit, does not really need to be made larger than it is. It only has to hold what it has already on the 40 GB unit. So ideally your clone on the new drive will be only marginally larger (to allow for a bit more slack space in it) than it already is on the 40 GB original drive.

So, you connect both drives to your laptop and use the Acronis True Image WD Edition package to re-do the cloning operation. Ideally it ought to be installed on your old C: drive and run from there. First step is to identify the Source and Destination Drives, and make sure that's right - the DESTINATION drive's contents will be destroyed! Next you find the place where you can Delete ALL of the Partitions on the DESTINATION drive. Then you get into setting up the cloning operation.

If at all possible, read the software manual ahead of time for this, so you know where to start looking for alternative menus. It will show you the Partition structure it finds on the SOURCE Disk and how it proposes to create the new disk's structure by default. NOTE: right here is where you should note down the sizes of the three Partitions on the old 40 GB HDD, because you will need that info to make the adjustment I propose. You need to find the way to another menu that allows you to manually specify the Partition details on the DESTINATION unit. The small recovery Partition only needs to be a little larger than the original. The second Partition, which WILL be your BOOT Partition and hence must be bootable, should have its size set as you wish - much larger than 64 GB. (See my note below on how to combine after.) (See also my last note on a small OS-only Partition some people prefer.) The third Partition can be a size you set also, whether it matches the C: Partition or not. Ideally you want to have the full 250 GB used in total. Once this is all set up you can have it do the cloning. When you're done you should have a Partition structure as you specified, and the new HDD ought to be able to fully function as your boot drive (via the C: "drive" Partition) without the old 40 GB unit in the machine.

Now, just suppose that you want to move all your applications and data to one large C: drive, rather than having it on a separate D: drive. I really doubt you can do that in one step during the cloning. However, you could arrange those Partitions so that the D: drive created is only just big enough to hold all the files from the old one on the 40 GB unit, and have the C: Partition created to take up the major portion of the new HDD. AFTER the whole cloning thing is complete and working, you could then COPY all the contents of the D: drive to the C: drive. Then you use Windows Disk Management to Delete that D: Partition from the 250 GB HDD unit, making it just Unallocated Space. However, the next step it tricky. What we'd like to do is add that Unallocated Space to the C: Partition to make it larger. BUT Windows XP will not do that when the boot Partition is involved. You need some third party software to expand the boot Partition - Partition Manager is one, but you have to pay for it.

There may be another way you want to lay out your Partitions. Some people like to make a somewhat smaller Partition (like 20 GB or whatever is right) on which their OS is installed, and not much else. The remainder of the HDD unit is one larger Partition that contains all applications and data files. The argument for this is that, if the OS becomes corrupted, it is relatively easy to re-install that OS on that same Partition without touching the other Partitions, so you don't lose all your data. If you want to follow this model, just set up the cloning software so that the C: (boot) Partition it creates is about the same size as it is now on the old 40 GB unit (maybe 5 GB larger), and then use all the rest of the 250 GB unit for the D: Partition.


Many thanks for your detailed feedback. Yes, I read the manual and I will try it again. I prefer to have a Recovery Partition, C-partition, and D-partition. As I mentioned earlier, in my last attempt I downsized the recovery partition to a similar size as on the old HD, which resulted in the following configuration: SQSERVICE (approx. 3 GB), C-partition (64 GB), and D-partition (64 GB). I tried but could not make the C- and D-partition larger to bring it up to the 250 GB.

The key difference is this:

If I have the new HD in my laptop and the old HD connected via USB and start the laptop via the bootable cloning disk and perform the cloning process, I end up with this configuration: SQSERVICE (approx. 3 GB), C-partition (64 GB), and D-partition (64 GB). Hereby, I can resize the three partitions but never get more than 131 GB.

If I clone by having the old HD in my laptop and the new HD attached via USB and the EZ Gig kit, I'll get a Recovery Partition (any size I want), and depending if I choose the manual or automatic partition sizing approach an approx. 110 GB C- and D-partition. If I take that newly cloned HD and put it in my laptop and start it, the laptop only recognizes the Recovery partition and the C-partition, but not the D-partition. So, the problem seems to be that the laptop does not want to recognize anything more than 131 GB although I have Win XP SP1, SP2, and SP3 installed (and I verified this).

The only thing that I can think of is to try and use a Partition Editor to see if that picks up the remaining 119 GB allowing me to resize the created partitions to be able to use the full HD.

Let me know, if you have any other thoughts or suggestions.
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a c 361 G Storage
June 9, 2010 9:47:47 PM

The results you get with the 40 GB old unit in the laptop and the 250 GB unit in the USB external enclosure (or, are you using an adapter?) with EZ Gig as the cloning software are odd in two ways. It won't make a Partition over 110 GB, AND the second Partition does not appear readable when the drive is moved into the laptop. I would be inclined to use that same connection arrangement and use the Acronis True Image WD Edition software to do the cloning operation. However, I am making an assumption here since you said you did use that Acronis package. The free WD Edition only will make a clone TO a WD drive. So, is the new 250 GB unit by WD? Then this ought to work. (By the way, IF your 250 GB is by Seagate instead, they have virtually the same free utility package on their site for use with their HDD products, called Disk Wizard.)
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June 9, 2010 10:48:17 PM

Paperdoc said:
The results you get with the 40 GB old unit in the laptop and the 250 GB unit in the USB external enclosure (or, are you using an adapter?) with EZ Gig as the cloning software are odd in two ways. It won't make a Partition over 110 GB, AND the second Partition does not appear readable when the drive is moved into the laptop. I would be inclined to use that same connection arrangement and use the Acronis True Image WD Edition software to do the cloning operation. However, I am making an assumption here since you said you did use that Acronis package. The free WD Edition only will make a clone TO a WD drive. So, is the new 250 GB unit by WD? Then this ought to work. (By the way, IF your 250 GB is by Seagate instead, they have virtually the same free utility package on their site for use with their HDD products, called Disk Wizard.)


Yes, I am using for this the Apricorn EZ Gig USB external enclosure. I have been using their software EZ Gig version II, version III, tried Acronics, and xxclone, and get the same result. Yes, my old and the new HD are both Western Digital Scorpio drives.
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a c 99 G Storage
June 10, 2010 12:01:28 AM

What mobo (or laptop) do you have. Most pre-2003 mobo don't support HDD over 138GB, unable to handle to 48-bit LBA. Some BIOS can update around this, most not.

Windows XP did not support large hard drives until SP2, so you should be okay.

Cloning or not, partions or not, if your mobo (laptop) won't support 48-bit LBA, you're SOL.
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a c 361 G Storage
June 10, 2010 2:37:43 AM

foscooter has raised a point I only thought of after my last post. If your laptop's disk controller and BIOS do not have 48-bit LBA Support, you will NOT be able to use any HDD larger than 128 GB (Microsoft's counting system) or 137 GB (drive manufacturer's version of it.) I understood most systems made after about 2000 had this in the IDE drive systems, but foscooter says maybe it was after 2003 for laptops. Only hint I could get was the manual on the Acer site for all Aspire 3000 series models was copyrighted in 2005.

The Acer site has an updated BIOS for some 3000-series machines, but they warn you NOT to do this without instructions from their Tech Support people, and place all responsibility for consequences on you. So at very minimum OP should contact Acer Tech Support and get them to tell you: does your machine have 48-bit LBA Support so it can use drives over 128GB? If not, can you safely update your BIOS to get that feature? If so, get VERY exact instructions from them on what to download, how to run it, and how to load default BIOS settings after the update so your machine can run. Ask also about any recommended changes to the default BIOS settings.
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June 10, 2010 12:18:12 PM

Paperdoc said:
foscooter has raised a point I only thought of after my last post. If your laptop's disk controller and BIOS do not have 48-bit LBA Support, you will NOT be able to use any HDD larger than 128 GB (Microsoft's counting system) or 137 GB (drive manufacturer's version of it.) I understood most systems made after about 2000 had this in the IDE drive systems, but foscooter says maybe it was after 2003 for laptops. Only hint I could get was the manual on the Acer site for all Aspire 3000 series models was copyrighted in 2005.

The Acer site has an updated BIOS for some 3000-series machines, but they warn you NOT to do this without instructions from their Tech Support people, and place all responsibility for consequences on you. So at very minimum OP should contact Acer Tech Support and get them to tell you: does your machine have 48-bit LBA Support so it can use drives over 128GB? If not, can you safely update your BIOS to get that feature? If so, get VERY exact instructions from them on what to download, how to run it, and how to load default BIOS settings after the update so your machine can run. Ask also about any recommended changes to the default BIOS settings.


Hmm, many thanks for pointing that out. Yes, I have read that I need to check my BIOS but was hoping that would not be necessary. It sounds like I have no other option.

The only thing that puzzles me is that I bought this laptop in 2005 and I looked through the BIOS change history after uploading the latest version (I have the one before the last installed) and the change history does not mention anything on readable hard drive size.

I guess that I'll need to call Acer Tech Support and bug them.
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a c 361 G Storage
June 10, 2010 1:39:29 PM

In talking about this subject, keep clear two very similar phrases. The original way to deal with "large hard disks" was called "LBA support". Introduced in the '90's, it used a 28-bit binary number to specify a hard disk location, but that limits its use to 128 GB of data (at 512 bytes, or ½ KB per sector). The revised version introduced late in the '90's changed to a 48-bit address for a MUCH larger range. So today we're looking for "48-bit LBA support", not just plain "LBA Support".
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a c 99 G Storage
June 10, 2010 5:39:50 PM

I may have been wrong about the date. When researching an older Asus P4P800-E Deluxe board, to see if supported 48-bit LBA, I came across an Asus website that listed which mobo's supported large hard drives. It had a header that said:

Note: Model manufactured after 1st January, 2003 will all support 48bit HDD (137 GB HDD)..

So, that's what lead me to believe that large HDD support became common in 2003.

However, I had/have an old Asus A7V (from 1997), and according to a BIOS update, or part of the BIOS update, it (could) support 48-bit LBA. I haven't tried yet, as large IDE HDD are expensive! This old machine has 2 30GB hard drives in it! WOW!:lol: 

BTW: When I refer to "large hard drives" or "48-bit LBA," it's the same thing (>137GB). ;) 
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a c 361 G Storage
June 10, 2010 6:30:27 PM

foscooter, I agree on what a "large hard drive" is. But back in the 90's when systems were marketed with the new LBA system, the most common phrase used to describe them was "supports large hard drives". By that they meant, something larger than about 32 GB. Until LBA was introduced, the old CHS addressing system, even pushed to the limit by re-defining a "disk allocation unit" as multiple Sectors, was limited to 32 GB. Because they had done that in all older literature (and some of those still exist as old images of manuals) that phrase became a source of confusion when LBA was revised to the 48-bit version.

The first PC's in our family (prior to that we had a Commodore 64) were acquired in 1993 when we opened a retail store. The store Point of Sale system had a 486-33MHz processor, 4 MB or RAM and a 200 MB HDD. It ran DOS 6.22 and Windows 3.1. The more powerful office unit had a 486-DX2 66 MHz processor, 16 MB of RAM, and a 310 MB HDD!! Some years later the office unit was upgraded and its parts moved to the store machine. It continued running on that hardware until I replaced it in 2008!
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a c 99 G Storage
June 10, 2010 7:09:18 PM

Ah, a history lesson. Gotcha! I remember my second system, a 386 with 1MB memory, and a 40MB hard drive (man that thing was noisy), and it ran DOS 5.0, and Lotus 2.2. Good Times!

BTW: My 1st sytem was an Apple IIe, with 2 5-1/2" floppy drives. I don't even know any other specs, beside an ImageWriter dot matrix printer.
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June 15, 2010 2:52:45 PM

Last weekend I updated my BIOS to the latest available version. This has unfortunately also not solved the problem. Interesting is that if I boot the computer via the cloning boot CD (don't even start Win XP), I will only identify 131 GB available HD space to use for the cloning versus the 250 GB that should be available.

Correct me if I am wrong, but doesn't that point to an issue still with the BIOS although I have upgraded the BIOS already or could there something else be wrong with the computer?

I would appreciate your input.

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Best solution

a c 99 G Storage
June 15, 2010 5:49:37 PM

I'm at at loss.

The BIOS upgrade still may not support a drive >137GB.

You'll have to contact the manufacter, follow PaperDoc's advise:

Quote:
"In talking about this subject, keep clear two very similar phrases. The original way to deal with "large hard disks" was called "LBA support". Introduced in the '90's, it used a 28-bit binary number to specify a hard disk location, but that limits its use to 128 GB of data (at 512 bytes, or ½ KB per sector). The revised version introduced late in the '90's changed to a 48-bit address for a MUCH larger range. So today we're looking for "48-bit LBA support", not just plain "LBA Support".
Share
June 15, 2010 6:05:03 PM

Best answer selected by martin_h101.
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June 15, 2010 6:05:44 PM

foscooter said:
I'm at at loss.

The BIOS upgrade still may not support a drive >137GB.

You'll have to contact the manufacter, follow PaperDoc's advise:

Quote:
"In talking about this subject, keep clear two very similar phrases. The original way to deal with "large hard disks" was called "LBA support". Introduced in the '90's, it used a 28-bit binary number to specify a hard disk location, but that limits its use to 128 GB of data (at 512 bytes, or ½ KB per sector). The revised version introduced late in the '90's changed to a 48-bit address for a MUCH larger range. So today we're looking for "48-bit LBA support", not just plain "LBA Support".



Thanks for your response. I contacted ACER Technical Support and they seemed to be more interested in signing up clients for their year-long tech support. I researched some more and found others with the same laptop that had the same problem and found that the processor a/o/ BIOS actually does not provide 48-bit LBA support. Thus, I'll have to live with the 128 or 131 GB that the processor recognizes. Thus, I may not be all to happy about this, but I can sleep peacefully now.
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a c 99 G Storage
June 16, 2010 11:56:34 PM

I found this: Hardware Forums.com

Still don't know if it'll shed some light, but good info.
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July 29, 2010 5:51:03 AM

martin_h101 said:
Thanks for your response. I contacted ACER Technical Support and they seemed to be more interested in signing up clients for their year-long tech support. I researched some more and found others with the same laptop that had the same problem and found that the processor a/o/ BIOS actually does not provide 48-bit LBA support. Thus, I'll have to live with the 128 or 131 GB that the processor recognizes. Thus, I may not be all to happy about this, but I can sleep peacefully now.


I have been successful with older laptops by keeping drive C below the 137 GB (128 GB as reported by Windows Explorer) BIOS limit and then using EASEUS Partition Manager to create a second partition containing all the rest. You need to run XP SP1 or higher. Here is a related post.

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/252202-32-older-lapto...
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