Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Can i build system with one Sata 2 and one IDE Hard Disk?

Last response: in Storage
Share
June 9, 2010 10:49:41 PM

Hi
Can i build system with one Sata 2 and one Pata/IDE Hard Disk?
June 9, 2010 11:53:12 PM

if you have an IDE controller on your motherboard then yes, you can.
m
0
l
a c 99 G Storage
June 9, 2010 11:54:36 PM

SURE!

Just check that the mobo has IDE (which is slowly going away). My Asus P6T has 6 SATA ports, which I have 5 drives hooked into them, and 1 IDE port, which my optical drive is hooked into. I just had to enable the PATA/IDE in BIOS.

Not that uncommon!

Now, floppy drives are going bye-bye quicker that IDE.

I once had a Asus P4800E-Deluxe that had 4 SATA I, and 2 IDE
m
0
l
Related resources

Best solution

a c 357 G Storage
June 10, 2010 3:50:44 AM

Once you set this up, there is a place in BIOS Setup where you specify the Boot Priority Sequence. Many people set theirs to try booting from their optical drive first and, if that fails, try a particular HDD next. (Of course, the HDD you specify here must be the one you installed your OS on.) Do NOT have it try to boot from any other device. In my own machine I have 3 choices set. My first is my floppy drive (yes, I have one), then one of my 2 opticals, then one of my 2 SATA HDD's. I can put a bootable floppy or optical drive in and boot from that, or I can leave them out and it will boot from my first SATA drive (that has Windows installed on it).
Share
June 10, 2010 11:51:29 AM

Best answer selected by Misko195.
m
0
l
June 10, 2010 11:54:11 AM

pinaplex said:
if you have an IDE controller on your motherboard then yes, you can.


Men i don't know, i have one IDE slot and 7 Sata2, that's it, right?

i have MSI P55-GD65 and 500gb Sata2, but i want to copy some files of my old HDD which is IDE...
m
0
l
June 10, 2010 11:56:08 AM

Paperdoc said:
Once you set this up, there is a place in BIOS Setup where you specify the Boot Priority Sequence. Many people set theirs to try booting from their optical drive first and, if that fails, try a particular HDD next. (Of course, the HDD you specify here must be the one you installed your OS on.) Do NOT have it try to boot from any other device. In my own machine I have 3 choices set. My first is my floppy drive (yes, I have one), then one of my 2 opticals, then one of my 2 SATA HDD's. I can put a bootable floppy or optical drive in and boot from that, or I can leave them out and it will boot from my first SATA drive (that has Windows installed on it).


Lol imsoo stupid, in BIOS i have disabled second and third boot disk. And yes i have windows OS on both disks...

I need something to do with jumpers, or not?
m
0
l
a c 357 G Storage
June 10, 2010 2:03:29 PM

Here's how to set up the drives.

It appears that you have this machine running using the SATA II HDD as your boot device, and you want to add to it an older IDE drive so you can access the files on it. The SATA unit will continue to be your boot drive even though the older IDE drive also has some Windows OS installed on it, too. That is a good plan. Whatever version of Windows is on the IDE unit, it probably was installed while in a different machine and it could not work in the new current machine without some fixing up.

You have the SATA II drive already installed and operating. You do NOT need to change anything about that. It appears you do not have any IDE devices installed at all right now, but you do have an IDE port on the mobo and, I assume, an IDE ribbon cable to connect to it. Examine the ribbon cable, It should have 80 wires in it, even though the connectors have only 40 holes in them. To check, start counting wires across its width. If you get to 20 and you are only ¼ of the way across, you're just fine. The cable ought to have three connectors of different colors, and each has a special bump on one side and one hole blanked off so that you cannot plug them in the wrong way. The Blue connector plugs into the mobo IDE port. The Black connector on the other end plugs into the Master IDE device. ANY IDE port MUST have a Master device to work. So, check your IDE HDD for a diagram on it that shows how to set jumpers on the back edge. Set them so the unit is a Master (or Master with No Slave Present, if that's the option). (I am assuming here that you do NOT have a second IDE device you want to install.) Now, physically mount the old IDE HDD in the case and connect to it a 4-pin Molex power supply from the PSU. Plug the Black end connector of the ribbon cable into the HDD.

As an aside, if you ever add a second IDE device to the machine, you must set its jumper to the Slave position and plug it into the middle Grey connector.

Close up the case, connect power, turn on and go immediately into BIOS Setup. Check where the IDE devices are configured to be sure the new drive's port is Enabled and the drive is detected by BIOS. Its drive type setting should be "AUTO" so the BIOS can auto-detect its parameters. Then go to where you set the Boot Priority Sequence. You should NOT have to change anything here, but just check that it is still as you want (e.g., optical first, SATA second, and no other choices allowed). Save and Exit and the machine should boot and show you that IDE device as a new drive in My Computer with its own letter name (possibly E:) , and all its files available to you.
m
0
l
June 10, 2010 5:28:26 PM

Paperdoc said:
Here's how to set up the drives.

It appears that you have this machine running using the SATA II HDD as your boot device, and you want to add to it an older IDE drive so you can access the files on it. The SATA unit will continue to be your boot drive even though the older IDE drive also has some Windows OS installed on it, too. That is a good plan. Whatever version of Windows is on the IDE unit, it probably was installed while in a different machine and it could not work in the new current machine without some fixing up.

You have the SATA II drive already installed and operating. You do NOT need to change anything about that. It appears you do not have any IDE devices installed at all right now, but you do have an IDE port on the mobo and, I assume, an IDE ribbon cable to connect to it. Examine the ribbon cable, It should have 80 wires in it, even though the connectors have only 40 holes in them. To check, start counting wires across its width. If you get to 20 and you are only ¼ of the way across, you're just fine. The cable ought to have three connectors of different colors, and each has a special bump on one side and one hole blanked off so that you cannot plug them in the wrong way. The Blue connector plugs into the mobo IDE port. The Black connector on the other end plugs into the Master IDE device. ANY IDE port MUST have a Master device to work. So, check your IDE HDD for a diagram on it that shows how to set jumpers on the back edge. Set them so the unit is a Master (or Master with No Slave Present, if that's the option). (I am assuming here that you do NOT have a second IDE device you want to install.) Now, physically mount the old IDE HDD in the case and connect to it a 4-pin Molex power supply from the PSU. Plug the Black end connector of the ribbon cable into the HDD.

As an aside, if you ever add a second IDE device to the machine, you must set its jumper to the Slave position and plug it into the middle Grey connector.

Close up the case, connect power, turn on and go immediately into BIOS Setup. Check where the IDE devices are configured to be sure the new drive's port is Enabled and the drive is detected by BIOS. Its drive type setting should be "AUTO" so the BIOS can auto-detect its parameters. Then go to where you set the Boot Priority Sequence. You should NOT have to change anything here, but just check that it is still as you want (e.g., optical first, SATA second, and no other choices allowed). Save and Exit and the machine should boot and show you that IDE device as a new drive in My Computer with its own letter name (possibly E:) , and all its files available to you.



Thank you men, i will try how you told me... And if i have a problem, then i will send you a PM, ok?
m
0
l
a c 357 G Storage
June 10, 2010 5:29:27 PM

PM's OK if you have a problem. Good luck.
m
0
l
!