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E7400, 3.7Ghz, 1.5v - is the voltage too high?

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May 19, 2010 10:00:26 AM

Hello
I am running my E7400 at 3.7Ghz with the new Cooler Master V8

the Vcore is at 1.5v, and I know that's high
the temperature at full is 61C, 40C idle

my question is, what kills the chip, the voltage or the temperature?

I would like to get a 3.8Ghz or even a 4Ghz, but since I have ATI Radeon 5850 I don't think the PSU can run both the 5850 and my E7400 overclocked at 4Ghz

Anyway, until now, 3.7Ghz is my record

Also, I have an Nforce 730i motherboard, and I've read that I can lower the southbridge and raise the northbridge if I want further overclocking

I am not 100% sure what those settings are

Thanks a lot for your support
a b à CPUs
May 19, 2010 10:50:04 AM

1,5V is high, but not too high. If those temperatures are from Core Temp, in my opinion, it's safe enough. You have them undercontrol.
On the other hand, both overvolting and high temps reduce the life of your cpu.
Anyway, keep in mind that 74.1C is the maximum temperature specified by Intel and 1.3625v is the maximum voltage specified by Intel.
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May 19, 2010 11:11:17 AM

1.5v for me is a bit high, as that processor is in the 45nm process. Also, I have the same processor as yours, but I can reach the same speeds by using the stock voltage. Although I'm using an aftermarket cooler....
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a b à CPUs
May 19, 2010 12:11:47 PM

stridervm said:
1.5v for me is a bit high, as that processor is in the 45nm process. Also, I have the same processor as yours, but I can reach the same speeds by using the stock voltage. Although I'm using an aftermarket cooler....


Every cpu is different. It seems you have a very good E7400. Anyway, not everybody had the same good luck.
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May 19, 2010 4:59:13 PM

Personally I think that is way too high. I cannot emphasize that enough. I had an old E7400 that ran at 4.1Ghz with 1.36v. This was with a huge Scythe HSF that kept it at 21C idle and 55C load. I wouldnt go over 1.4v with those chips.

I also ran mine 24/7 which makes a difference regarding voltage.
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a b à CPUs
May 19, 2010 5:57:52 PM

1.5v is too high. I'm surprised your temps aren't MUCH higher.

I wouldn't run a 45nm that far over voltage spec for 24/7, no matter the temps.

Temps are more important than voltage, but you're still running much more power through the chip than is intended.

Do you need this much voltage to stay stable when overclocked?

What other voltage options do you have in your BIOS?
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May 20, 2010 5:54:41 AM

Well the chip is just $99, but I want to buy a QX9650 so I want to learn all about overclocking first

To be honest, I've reached 3720 Mhz with 1.45v

I don't think 1.45v is too high, since a lot of people say 1.45 is safe, 1.40v is ok, and 1.365v is optimal

However, the thing will not overclock at 3.7Ghz with those voltages

I can overclock it to 3664 Mhz with 1.40v


So, I don't want to burn my chip just because I was running at 3.7Ghz instead of 3.65Ghz

I want to be clear in that

However, does it really makes a difference 1.45v vs 1.40v?

Right now I am encoding an Adobe Premiere CS4 video (Call of Duty Black Ops Trailer), and browsing the internet, and man, it's a BIG difference when the processor is properly overclocked

so if I can stay at 3.7Ghz, I'll stay there

the reason I NEED to raise my voltage is because as soon as I turn on the PC, the nasty ATI Radeon 5850 uses pretty much all the voltage it can use, as it runs the ventilator at 100% for about 4-5 seconds.

So I guess that's why I need to specifically add more voltage for the processor

I think I can reach 3.62Ghz with 1.362v, but again, if the chip is not going to be damaged, I'll rather do 3.7Ghz

Has anybody overclocked their processor to 1.4v?

I want to use each processor for around 18-24 months. This processor is already a year old, so it I use it 2-3 more months, that's fine

The next processor, QX9650 or Core i7 930 will also be overclocked, so that is why this question is very important for me

As for now, I can make mistakes (AKA burn the chip)
But, of course, I want to do things without burning anything, even this Core 2 Duo, it works great at 3.7GHz
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a c 172 à CPUs
a c 197 K Overclocking
May 20, 2010 3:44:13 PM

Intel's recommended max voltage is 1.3625 volts and their absolute max for a 45 nm C2 CPU is 1.45 volts. Above that, all bets are off.

Either excessive voltage or temperatures will kill a CPU chip prematurely. How prematurely is the question.
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May 21, 2010 1:25:45 AM

I reached 3.6GHz on an E6750 with is a 2.66GHz 65nm CPU. There is no reason a that CPU needs 1.5V to reach 3700MHz. Intel's recommended max voltage is 1.3625V, as jsc has previously stated. Here is the link

http://processorfinder.intel.com/details.aspx?sSpec=SLB...

I would drop the CPU voltage and find the minimum CPU voltage you can use for the frequency. Too high of a voltage can severely degrade the CPU over time.
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
May 21, 2010 2:20:51 AM

Dude, if you have an E7400 with the 10.5 multiplier, you are using WAY too much voltage.

I'm going to take a shot in the dark here, the only thing you have changed in the Bios is the FSB and the VCORE and maybe the ram multiplier??


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June 3, 2010 12:02:45 AM

Hello guys
I took some pictures so you can know what I'm doing
I was playing Total War (Empire, Napoleon, Medieval), and the computer freezes, so I had to use around 3.5Ghz to make those games stable.

So, I want to know what is the stable speed for my computer.

I heard something about lowering the Mhz of the RAM (did that), and then raising the voltage for the Northbridge

I am not sure how to do that, so I posted pictures of the stuff I did, I am currently running the computer at 3.7Ghz but I'm 99% sure it will freeze now when I play Napoleon









I am running on a Cooler Master V8, that is the best sub $100 CPU heat sink I found

I appreciate your responses
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a b à CPUs
June 3, 2010 12:37:15 AM

If you want that CPU to last longer than a year keep your voltage under 1.4v.

Your Chipset Voltage option is likely your NB voltage.

With those volts I wouldn't be surprised if you're crashing from heat rather than stability.

Also, change your memory ratio to 1:1. What is your ram rated by the manufacture? If I'm reading right your ram is running at 700/1400mhz. Standard speed for DDR2 is 400/800mhz. This could be your culprit.
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June 3, 2010 1:54:12 AM

Raidur said:
If you want that CPU to last longer than a year keep your voltage under 1.4v.

Your Chipset Voltage option is likely your NB voltage.

With those volts I wouldn't be surprised if your crashing from heat rather than stability.

Also, change your memory ratio to 1:1. What is your ram rated by the manufacture? If I'm reading right your ram is running at 700/1400mhz. Standard speed for DDR2 is 400/800mhz. This could be your culprit.


Well bro to be honest with you the memory is set at 700 Mhz because that's the only way to pass the 3.6Ghz wall

Now, thanks for the Northbridge explanation, I appreciate your post

I am now able to play Napoleon Total War with 3.7Ghz :D 

Now, do you have experience with 1.45v?
It really kills the processor after one year?

After this, I want to buy Intel Core 2 Quad 9550, I think it's a great Quad for about $200 and I can overclock it to 3.6 - 3.7Ghz

I will try to POST with 3.7Ghz and 1.40V, but I doubt it will work, but hey, let's see

I will use my CPU with 1.40V, from what I read that voltage is still OK

What I want to learn is experience, has anybody used a processor at 1.45V before?

Any damages so far?
Do you speak from personal experience or knowledge from other forums/websites?

Thanks a lot for your help
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a b à CPUs
June 3, 2010 7:49:15 PM

Is the Memory Ratio option changeable? If you can get 1:1 then your RAM would downclock to match your FSB of ~354. This will take your ram out of the equation so you can play more with the CPU.

I do not have experience at 1.45v and above (I do have experience with core2 overclocking), and I do not know the 'kill' voltage for them either. I do know that I've never seen anyone use more than 1.4v on air for 24/7. Personally, I like to keep it within intel spec(1.36v) on air.

Have you tried a small FTT in Prime 95 at that voltage?

1.4v is better, still a little high IMO but i'd call it safe on air if temps were reasonable during Prime95. 1.45v however, is pushing it.
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