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How do people get 10+ degree celsius drops in CPU temp?

Last response: in Overclocking
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May 21, 2010 2:37:49 AM

I've been doing research on the best air HSF for my system and i've seen so many people on newegg saying that they installed this/that HSF and got an immediate 10 degree celsius drop. How is that even possible if all they're replacing is the HSF? They didn't say that they upgraded their case, fans, or anything else to improve airflow. I've gone through 3 HSF and i've only noticed a 2 degree drop. Are they starting off with a broken craptastic HSF to begin with? I just don't get it.
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a b K Overclocking
May 21, 2010 2:44:40 AM

Well seeing you have given no information as to your system specs or the HSF's you have tried, my answer is "try a good HSF".
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May 21, 2010 2:50:13 AM

Oops, I normally attach a sig. Looks like i forgot.

I have a Phenom II x 4 955 BE. I've tried the stock fan, Arctic Cooling Freezer 64 Pro and i'm currently using the Scythe Katana 3.

I'm getting 52 degrees celsius after running prime95 for 8 hours. The temp in the room was around 22 degrees celsius.

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AMD Phenom II X4 955 BE 3.2GHz | ASUS M4A785TD-V EVO | G.SKILL 4GB DDR3 1333 (PC3 10600) F3-10600CL8D-4GBHK | XFX GeForce 9800 GT 512MB | Corsair CMPSU-650TX 650W | WD Caviar Blue 500GB | Scythe Katana 3 HSF | 2 x GELID FN-FW12-15-B 120mm WING 12 | Windows 7 64-bit
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May 21, 2010 3:09:34 AM

Thank you for the link.
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Best solution

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May 21, 2010 3:36:21 AM

Tips for better cooling, whether you are air cooling or water cooling:

1) Reduce your cable clutter inside your case by using proper cable management. The more you are able to reroute cables, the better airflow will be inside the case.

2) Use a good TIM (Thermal Interface Material). Most of the stuff you get with your HSF is nothing more than silicone grease. Go look at the the reviews and get something better. Myself, I was sold on AS5 a long time ago, though there are several out there who use other stuff. As importatnt as your choice of material is the amount you use. Remember, the less you use, the better off you will be. The TIM is intended to do nothing more than fill the natural pits and valleys that exist in the surface of the heat spreader and HSF.

3) Some folks will lap (use very fine grit sandpaper) the heat spreader and HSF to a mirror finish. This will bring in another 2-3 C. Just realize, this voids the warranty on your CPU, but very useful on old kit you are trying to push a bit longer.

4) Look at were your computer is sitting in your room and determine if there is a better spot for it other than tucked in the corner or under a desk where the airflow is restricted.

5) Take a look at the ambient temperature int he room where you keep your computer. The higher the ambient temperature, the hotter your machine will run.

Good luck!
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May 21, 2010 4:01:10 AM

Thanks for the tips.

I think i'm going with the SCYTHE SCANG-1100 KAMA ANGLE. It appears to have a good combination of value, low noise, decent cooling, not too large, and fairly easy installation.

I really want the Noctua NH-D14 though, but i'm scared of it's size.
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a b K Overclocking
May 21, 2010 2:34:22 PM


< Rambling And Nonsensical Wall Of Text Crits You for 80 Billiondy >

< You Die >
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May 21, 2010 3:50:14 PM

Now look here son...I say, stop downlodin' all them there pron stuff...You're sure to go blind, let alone get every known piece of malware known to man, and the next thing you know, you're randomly posting random crap on Tom's. It just ain't right!
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May 27, 2010 12:09:45 AM

Ive been reading about the Noctua NH-D14.. to me it seems like a must have as long as it will fit in your budget/case.
Nh-D14
Comes with good strong silent fans and apparently copious amounts of a thick TIM.

Same as you though, I worrie about its size. Every new egg comment on the thing reiterates that ''wow, you really dont realise it till you get it, Its HUGE, MASSIVE, GIGANTIC" etc. It can be an intimidating prospect especially if you're new like me.

Most issues seem to be with non-standard Ram Heat spreaders (that are to tall) dimm1-2 being in the way. Sometimes having to remove the spreader off the ram moduls to get a fit. (and of course, you may have to remove the Heatsink to upgrade/change ram in the future)

But for the supposid -best- CPU Heatsink to date.. I dont think thats to bad.

-edit-

Apparently its not the best? lol
http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...
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May 27, 2010 12:51:37 AM

The best heatsink will depend on which site you visit heh heh, but i would say that all of them have a very similar top 10 list.

I went with the Scythe Kama Angle because it's a mid-range option and should install easily. The cool thing about it is that due to it's shape/design, you can mount 2 additional 120mm fans on it. I'm curious to see how much it helps with the cooling.
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May 27, 2010 1:09:58 AM

It sucks making choices if you have abit of OCD (me) :] Glad you've found your solution!
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May 27, 2010 4:33:05 AM

Oh yeah, i totally understand the OCD thing. I second guess my purchases all the time. I always think that i could have made a better choice, got a better deal, etc...

The madness!
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June 11, 2010 5:26:41 PM

I just wanted to provide an update. I'm very pleased with my new cooler, the Scythe Kama Angle. I paid $43 for it, which includes shipping and handling. Although it is probably considered a mid-range cooler, i wanted a cooler that wasn't too big, was easy to install, and was quiet. I'm able to reach 3.8GHz and prime95 tops out at 60 degrees (i know that technically i should aim for 55 degrees). I've tried 3 other coolers before this one and the highest safe speed i was able to get was 3.5GHz.

The cool thing about this cooler is that i can install 2 more 120mm fans to it. I ordered 1 fan a few days ago and i bet I'll be able to lower the temp by a few more degrees.

AMD Phenom II X4 955 BE OC 3.8GHz | ASUS M4A785TD-V EVO | G.SKILL 4GB DDR3 1333 (PC3 10600) F3-10600CL8D-4GBHK | XFX GeForce 9800 GT 512MB | Corsair CMPSU-650TX 650W | WD Caviar Blue 500GB | Scythe Kama Angle Rev. B | 2 x GELID FN-FW12-15-B 120mm WING 12 | Windows 7 64-bit

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June 16, 2012 9:13:16 AM

Houndsteeth said:
Tips for better cooling, whether you are air cooling or water cooling:

1) Reduce your cable clutter inside your case by using proper cable management. The more you are able to reroute cables, the better airflow will be inside the case.http://www.replicVuitton Handba
2) Use a good TIM (Thermal Interface Material). Most of the stuff you get with your HSF is nothing more than silicone grease. Go look at the the reviews and get something better. Myself, I was sold on AS5 a long time ago, though there are several out there who use other stuff. As importatnt as your choice of material is the amount you use. Remember, the less you use, the better off you will be. The TIM is intended to do nothing more than fill the natural pits and valleys that exist in the surface of the heat spreader and HSF.

3) Some folks will lap (use very fine grit sandpaper) the heat spreader and HSF to a mirror finish. This will bring in another 2-3 C. Just realize, this voids the warranty on your CPU, but very useful on old kit you are trying to push a bit longer.

4) Look at were your computer is sitting in your room and determine if there is a better spot for it other than tucked in the corner or under a desk where the airflow is restricted.

5) Take a look at the ambient temperature int he room where you keep your computer. The higher the ambient temperature, the hotter your machine will run.

Good luck![/msgquoted" target="_blank">

I agree with so much!!! I think a best- CPU Heatsink is very important
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a b K Overclocking
June 16, 2012 9:47:47 AM

This topic has been closed by Nikorr
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June 26, 2012 12:27:23 AM

Best answer selected by foggydj.
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