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I7-930 undervolting.

Last response: in Overclocking
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Which voltage is better for the chip?

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May 21, 2010 8:48:41 AM

I have an asus p6t. Here are my voltages.
1.1 Cpu Voltage
1.8 CPU PLL Voltage
1.2 QPI/DRAM Core Voltage 1.2
1.1 IOH Voltage
1.5 IOH PCIE Voltage
1.2 ICH Voltage
1.5 ICH PCIE Voltage
1.5 DRAM Bus Voltage

(These are manually set. ASUS was doing funky things with the voltages.)

i have the vcore undervolted to 1.1v. Is this going to cause trouble? The closer the dram voltage is to the vcore voltage...the safer, right?

Basically...i believe the stock voltage for the 930 is 1.2 vcore.

If adding voltage reduces the lifespan of the chip, then would undervolting increase it? It runs fine at both settings, and there is no real change in temps. (+/- 1 degree).


Also, which voltage settings are best left to the MB to decide (aka which ones should i leave on auto instead of manually setting).

I've heard that to of these need to be within .5v from each other. Which two are they?

And last but not least, which one is actually for my ram? There seems to be a few with DRAM in the label.

Your answer will be greatly appreciated, im sort of new to the i7 overclocking.

I will reciprocate!!!

Thanks guys! (and gals)

More about : 930 undervolting

a c 110 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
May 21, 2010 3:27:08 PM

Undervolting will cause system instability at some point. It`s not recommended.

ASUS should be pretty good.

Things to try:
1) look for a new motherboard BIOS
2) do not undervolt
3) do not overclock (at least until your system is stable)
4) Run Memtest for your RAM, Orthos or other CPU stress test
5) If you have to manually apply voltages and timings make sure they are as close as possible to the recommended ones.

*Note: you can get problems by mixing different RAM even if the timings look similar or the same.
a b à CPUs
a c 125 K Overclocking
May 21, 2010 3:31:15 PM

I don't understand why people are saying "don't undervolt". You can still overclock with less than stock voltage, undervolting will reduce heat output and increase the life of the CPU. All you have to do is test for stability like you would anyway.

I recommend undervolting.
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May 22, 2010 7:42:54 AM

I was mainly trying to figure out what the rules are for i7 voltages...i know that two of the voltages need to be within .5v of eachother and blah blah blah.
May 22, 2010 7:48:26 AM

And to add to this...I was asking because my motherboard was making me a little uncomfortable. There is no real way to find out you're dram voltages while the machine is running...therefore, i have no way of finding what the "auto" settings are truely running their voltages at.
a c 180 à CPUs
a c 131 K Overclocking
May 22, 2010 8:09:18 PM

Undervolting is highly recommended...as long as you can maintain stability.

See this P6T overclocking bible:

http://vip.asus.com/forum/view.aspx?id=2008122019104023...

Voltage optimization

At least CPU Voltage, DRAM Bus Voltage and QPI/DRAM Core Voltage should be set manually.

When you are satisfied with your overclocking, I recommend optimizing CPU Voltage, QPI/DRAM Core Voltage and DRAM Bus Voltage, which means finding the lowest possible voltage where 100% stability is achieved, running a stress test program for at least overnight.

Start with optimizing the memory voltage by lowering the DRAM Bus Voltage by 1-2 notch(es) at a time, until Memtest86+ shows errors within 10 minutes – then increase by 1 notch and test again. In the end, not a single error is allowed for a run overnight.

Use Orthos/Prime95, the same way as described for memory voltage, to find the lowest possible CPU Voltage that makes the PC run error free under stress for at least overnight.


On this box, we have several OC profiles set up. The one for "everyday" use is set at 3/77 GHz with 1.125 vcore and 1.5725 for DRAM determined as per the above. This was determined by leaving all BIOS settings at Auto, finding the highest stable OC, and then reducing voltages as per the above. At this voltage, CPU temps are in the low to mid 50's. Why run at 1.25 when you can run at much lower temperatures at 1.125 ????

The 4.0 and 4.2 GHz OC's required numerous BIOS edits and voltages were determined the same way but these require 1.30 and 1/35 vcore to be stable. In short, if you can undervolt w/o losing anything, by all means do so and ncrease the thermal load on your components.

a c 180 à CPUs
a c 131 K Overclocking
May 22, 2010 8:16:59 PM

jamesyboy said:
And to add to this...I was asking because my motherboard was making me a little uncomfortable. There is no real way to find out you're dram voltages while the machine is running...therefore, i have no way of finding what the "auto" settings are truely running their voltages at.


Installed Asus probe ?

http://support.asus.com/download/download.aspx?SLanguag...

Select MoBo / 1366 / P6T / Hit SEARCH button
Select OS / Select Utilities / Select PC probe from list

This info is also displayed in BIOS

Also see OCCT for displaying and graphingvcore and your 3.4, 5 and 12 volt rails while testing

http://www.ocbase.com/perestroika_en/index.php?Download
May 23, 2010 8:25:42 AM

Rustyy117 said:
I don't understand why people are saying "don't undervolt". You can still overclock with less than stock voltage, undervolting will reduce heat output and increase the life of the CPU. All you have to do is test for stability like you would anyway.

I recommend undervolting.


Yes, I'm agree with you, I also have core I7 and make undervolting is very great because core I7 produces much heat.
!