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2 Double Channel vs 1 Tripple Channel

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May 7, 2009 10:09:27 PM

I'm a little confused between the Double and Tripple Channel differences.

If a Motherboard is rated as Double Channel, and it has 4 slots, does that mean two seperate sets of Double Channel?

If that's the case, would 2 Double Channel be faster than 1 Tripple Channel?

I'm considering buying this Mobo but this would be a big decision point:
http://usa.asus.com/products.aspx?l1=3&l2=181&l3=896&l4...

Manual for Mobo (if needed):
http://dlsvr.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/socketAM3/M4A79T_Delu...

thanks in advance!
a c 80 } Memory
a c 233 V Motherboard
May 8, 2009 12:13:56 AM

Since you're buying a dual channel motherboard with 4 memory slots, then you should buy one or two dual channel memory kit(s). If you bought a motherboard for an i7 (X58 chipset and six memory slots), then you would buy one or two triple channel memory kit(s).
May 8, 2009 7:20:18 PM

Sorry, let me ask my question in a different way:

1. Would it be faster to do 2 x 8GB or 4 x 4 GB (assuming Dual Channel in both cases)?
2. How does Dual Channel work with 4 slots. Is it two seperate dual channels, or does each channel span 2 slots?
3. If it's two seperate dual channels, would 4x4GB dual be faster than 3x4GB tripple (only talking about speed, not capacity)

thanks!
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a b } Memory
a b V Motherboard
May 8, 2009 7:43:17 PM

Provided the motherboard is able to run the same timings and speeds for both setups, the difference between a 2x8 or 4x4 will be minimal on artificial benchmarks and undetectable by a human being. Having said that, know that from an electrical perspective 2 Dimms are easier to drive than 4.
September 21, 2009 3:10:35 AM

how much difference would triple channel memory makeover dual channel memory on the same Rampage II board w i7 920?
a b } Memory
a b V Motherboard
September 21, 2009 3:25:06 AM

That depends on the application. If you are getting a CPU with a triple channel controller (basically, any 1366 i7), you might as well get the tri-channel.
September 21, 2009 5:35:50 AM

avamid said:
2. How does Dual Channel work with 4 slots. Is it two seperate dual channels, or does each channel span 2 slots?


This: "each channel span 2 slots"
a b } Memory
a b V Motherboard
September 21, 2009 7:43:06 AM

Going back to your original question.

Look at the RAM Recommended list and the 1600 addendum. Note the 3 columns at the right which refer to whether you can put 4 or only 2 sticks in the slots. There is a limitation on AM3/AM2+ design which limits some ability to use all four slots at full top speed - I don't know all the details on this.

But to make sure this doesn't affect you, if you want 8GBs of RAM, then get a pair of 4GB modules. If you want 16GBs, get a pair of 8GB modules. Don't use 4 of anything if you can avoid it. You'll likely end up with RAM that runs faster. (When the RAM guide mentions a kit of 3 - it's just stupid. That means that they only had the 3 stick kit on hand to test - not that you can use 3 of the sticks!)

This board doesn't support both dual and triple channel RAM. On an Intel-based board with a choice, it must be hard to measure, since you would never have the same amount of total RAM. That is, you can't compare dual-channel with 4GBs to triple channel with 6GBs. The 6 will be "faster". Likewise, dual channel with 8GBs will be "faster" than triple with 6GBs. I really don't know the answer if it can be quantified.

And there is no such thing as one triple channel. Gotta have 3 sticks to make a triple. If you put 3 sticks in a dual channel, then you lose dual channel ability. Notice the RAM guide for board shows only 1 stick, 2 sticks or 4 sticks - never 3.
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