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Unlocked Core - Cant get temps?

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June 3, 2010 7:33:14 AM

Hi All,

I got an Athlon II x3 440, and an MSI 485tgm-e45. I played around with the acc and was able to get the 4th core unlocked (reading as a Phenom II X4 B40).. I ran Prime95 for an hour no crashes, so I went and played with the OC Switch on the board (am a noob, didnt feel confident enough to play with the FSB manually). I set the switch to "FSB +10%" and started testing... My concern at this point is I don't get any temp readings using Coretemp (says doesnt support my B40?) or OCCT (amd overclock tool reports temp as -256). I have been playing with SF4 max settings @ 1920x1080 for about 6 hours now without incident, is it safe to assume it is stable?

Complete specs:
Athlon II X3 440 (--> Phenom II X4 B40 @ 3.3ghz) , Stock Cooler
MSI 785tgm-E45
2GB OCZ GOLD
500gb WD Caviar Blue
Palit GTX260+

Thanks in advance!

More about : unlocked core temps

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a c 101 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
June 3, 2010 7:38:24 AM
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Unlocking cores disables the temperature sensors the motherboard should have a sensor but it will read around 10C under the core temp. If you don't have a program to check the temp then I would put it back to stock speeds (still with 4 cores). If you can check the temp you need to run Prime95 for 6 hours to see if its stable and keep am eye on the temp.
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
June 3, 2010 7:54:59 AM

Yeah, the core sensors are disabled so I would be especially careful considering you are using the stock heat sink.
I believe max operating temp for that cpu is 62C so if you are hitting 52 ambient or higher you better clock back down until you get some better cooling.
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June 3, 2010 9:08:01 AM

Best answer selected by Ev1LrYu.
June 3, 2010 9:08:42 AM

thanks for the input, Ill go ahead and go back to stock clocks. :) 
June 3, 2010 8:14:15 PM

Assuming thermal paste is applied evenly, I would assume that all core temps should be in the same general range. I really don't see the harm in OC'n carefully... just keep an eye on the temps you can monitor, run appropriate stability tests, and be certain you have properly applied your thermal paste.
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
June 3, 2010 8:26:58 PM

rodney_ws said:
Assuming thermal paste is applied evenly, I would assume that all core temps should be in the same general range. I really don't see the harm in OC'n carefully... just keep an eye on the temps you can monitor, run appropriate stability tests, and be certain you have properly applied your thermal paste.


IIRC AMD CPUs only have a single sensor anyway and not a sensor per core so the core temps will always read the same on an AMD system.

From Core Temp - How it Works Web page :
Quote:
AMD processors report the temperature via a special register in the CPU's northbridge. Core Temp reads the value from the register and uses a formula provided by AMD to calculate the current temperature.
The formula for the Athlon 64 series, early Opterons and Semprons (K8 architecture) is: 'Core Temp = Value - 49'.
For the newer generation of AMD processors like Phenom, Phenom II, newew Athlons, Semprons and Opterons (K10 architecture), and their derivatives, there is a differnt formula: 'CPU Temp* = Value / 8'.

The sensor in AMD CPUs can report temperatures between -49C and 206C.

*CPU Temp is because the Phenom\Opteron (K10) have only one sensor per package, meaning there is only one reading per processor.
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