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Corrupt Raid Array Recovery

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Anonymous
a b G Storage
June 24, 2010 5:09:43 PM

Hi there,

The PSU on my custom built system recently died. It took a while to diagnose this as the problem and i tried numerous things before i came to reaslise that it was a dead PSU. One of the tests i did was to reset the Motherboard CMOS ( i was following a guide at the time)

Cut forward and by other techniques i've discovered it was the PSU at fault, i've bought a new one and got it all installed. Now the system boots up up until the 3 seconds into the windows Windows loading screen. After this i am confronted with a BSOD or a message "error loading operating system".

The hard drives (two 500gb) were in RAID 0, i've set this up in the Nforce setup screen. I've also done the basic settings in BIOS (time, date, boot order etc).

So, i put in the windows CD, load up the raid drivers then go into the recovery console. I tried to perform a BOOTCFG /SCAN, but windows reported:
"Failed to successfully scan disks for windows installations. This error may be caused by a corrupt file system"

This leaves me stumped, is it possible to just reset it all and have the computer work as before?

Hope someone can help!

Thanks
a c 82 G Storage
June 24, 2010 5:28:39 PM

With RAID0 you unfortunately might have to restore from the last full backup. If you're lucky, recovery tools might prove helpful. You can take a look at http://www.diskinternals.com/raid-recovery/ and other similar tools.
a c 127 G Storage
June 25, 2010 2:01:01 PM

Did you try booting from Ubuntu?

You can get your data back by using RAID recovery software or free manual methods involving Ubuntu linux or FreeBSD for example.

If you require help you can write me directly, but with a damaged filesystem you have to use recovery programs if chkdsk cannot fix it. First you would have to create a normal disk out of your RAID0 array; so you can use normal recovery procedures. For that you need an empty disk as big as the RAID0 itself; thus at least twice the capacity of the size of your RAID0 disk members.
!