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Dual Boot question for win98 & Xp

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  • Dual Boot
  • Windows XP
  • Product
Last response: in Windows XP
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October 11, 2001 12:26:05 AM

I want to set up my computer to do a dual boot with 98se and winxp. I have searched many sites concerning how to do this. Well after looking at 2 how-tos on the microsoft website i am not sure what I can and can not do. Alright. I understand i have to put an OS on a different partrion. Np. Well I have read that you have to install your programs on each OS. And i have also read that you can have a partrion that contains the programs you want to share between the two. Both were stated on the microsoft website. So what it is? Also I have read that ntfs file system was a one way deal for the HD. So if i converted my partion over to ntfs i would not be able to convert back to FAT32? I keep searching and reading but i do not find a concrete answer.

Please help!

Thanks for all replies

More about : dual boot question win98

Anonymous
October 11, 2001 7:27:44 PM

You can't convert back, according the trusty Windows 2000 manual, at least with the microsoft tools. There may be some 3rd party software out there, but until you find it, don't count on it.
I would have a win 98 partition (fat32), xp partition(ntfs), and then an applications/documents partition (fat 32).
October 11, 2001 8:31:08 PM

Re:"..Well I have read that you have to install your programs on each OS. And i have also read that you can have a partrion that contains the programs you want to share between the two..."

You can share data, no problem. But programs.....?
Make a network installation on a program server for the workstations running the same OS, if the programs are designed for network installation or allow to do that, ...but because of the complicity of most modern programs it is better to install them separately into separate locations (either different folders on the same partition, or different partitions) on a computer with dual (multiple) boot from every different OS.
October 11, 2001 8:31:53 PM

So it is true i can install all programs on one partition while i have both OS's on a different one? Dosen't the programs need to install into the OS you are using for it to run properly?

Thanks for your reply
October 12, 2001 4:54:56 PM

generally speaking, you can install a program in the same place from 2 os's, however due to the way windows works, most programs need to be installed on both os's.
For example, we have 3 partitions, all fat32 (for simplicity- if one is ntfs then drive letters may be different under 98). We have partitions C,D,E
C is win98, D is XP, and E is where we want to install M$ word.
Boot into 98, install word on E as you normally would. boot into xp, if you try and run word it will tell you its not installed correctly. Install word onto E in the exact same place. Now you have it installed twice and once at the same time! which is what we want.


Next time you wave - use all your fingers
October 13, 2001 4:34:51 PM

THANKS ALOT.

I love forums
October 13, 2001 6:37:11 PM

Yes, I agree, "generally speaking, you can install a program in the same place from 2 os's, however due to the way windows works, most programs need to be installed on both os's."
And there are recommendations on how to do it correctly:
<A HREF="http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q236/9..." target="_new">FF2000: How to Install Office 2000 on a Dual-Boot System</A>

But again, generally speaking, you are sort of looking for troubles by doing that.

Without going deeply into discussion on how software works, just want to say that unfortunately, some applications install different executable files for each OS, in which case you have to create separate directory structures. You can't predict which applications will install different executable files, so you need to rely on experience to learn which applications behave this way.
You might also have trouble uninstalling an application that the OSs share. The OS from which you first run the uninstall process will delete the executable files and libraries and will remove entries for the application from the OS's Registry database, but the OS won't touch the other OS's Registry. When you dual-boot to the other OS, the uninstall process might fail because the executable file is missing. Then, you need to reinstall the application before you can uninstall it.

Be aware, that <A HREF="http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q221/9..." target="_new">
“…Microsoft has confirmed this to be a problem in the Microsoft products…”</A>

NOTE: Office Setup installs Microsoft Internet Explorer to the \Program Files\Internet Explorer folder of the operating system drive by default. This is the recommended installation method for Microsoft Internet Explorer.
When you make changes to options within Microsoft Office programs, those changes may not be recognized in the other version of Windows and may need to be configured while you are running the program in the other version of Windows. Especially when you run patches and updates.

With the price about $3 for 1 GB harddrive space (my 41 GB Deskstar) and with Office directory taking about 168 MB of space and ~22 MB for IE, I don't think that I would save much by dual-boot Office installation.
October 13, 2001 7:11:37 PM

WOw Nick. Thanks alot for that info...very nice
!