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Failed ext hdd?

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June 27, 2010 10:24:45 PM

I've had a WD My Book Essential 250GB External Hard Drive WDG1U1600N for about 3 years now. I use it almost everyday plugged into my desktop computer for storage of my music and movies. Yesterday, when I turned on my computer, it started to spin up, sputtered, made a few clunky attempts to turn on, then went quiet (the green ring is still lit). It also doesn't show up on My Computer. I think it may have died on me, but what I want to know, is how can I make sure it's dead? Can I save the data on there? If so, how can I do it?

Next following question is... I'm looking for a replacement backup/storage drive. I've heard a little bit about solid state drives and then RAID drives, but I'm not really up to date on technology. I want something that is will last a little longer than 3 years, can be used on a relatively frequent basis (few hrs/day), and is not too expensive. What are my options? Thanks a lot!

More about : failed ext hdd

June 27, 2010 11:25:58 PM

bummer, sounds like your external drive just crashed. you could remove the drive and plug directly into the motherboard. avoid excessive movement when removing potentially damaged drive.

once you directly plugin to yr pc (assuming not a mac), see if windows can detect it and make it available in explorer window or listed in my computer. if you can see it, don't do anything yet. copy the most important stuff out. hard drive can fail during transfer.

i would recommend getting the hard disk smart logs off the drive. i use an app call aeo3 hd smart. i use it at work as it's free (even commercial work!). it shows the drive health and age. Copy-Paste the log here. we'll take a look if it's ok.
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June 27, 2010 11:26:55 PM

oh forgot... the app download site is

http://aeo3.com/apps/hdsmart/index.html



and yr 2nd question. :) 

Solid state drives are great as a system drive (like C:\) for the operating systems. Extremely expensive as large data storage. I run 1 TB raid mirror setup on my main PC at home. No fancy stuff. RAID-1 Mirror is super easy to recover - actually you need not do anything. if 1 fails, the other just run normal except a warning when bootup.

for additional protection, i got an online backup like carbonite. it's like insurance.

http://www.carbonite.com/.
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June 28, 2010 1:04:12 AM

I managed to remove the drive and plug it into my computer (it used IDE inside). But it still does not show up in windows explorer. It does the same thing, spins a little, clicks a few times, then is quiet. I think I can still hear something spin, but it's faint... What else can I do??
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a b G Storage
June 28, 2010 1:38:08 AM

I think that your drive is dead, check to see if you can return it under warranty or if the data is important to you and can afford it, send it to a professional data recovery firm. If you have nothing to lose you may want to try the refrigerator trick, put the drive into the freezer for twenty minutes and then try it again and see if it works, if it does immediately recover your data.
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June 28, 2010 1:29:48 PM

ya. sad but it's probably dead.
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June 28, 2010 3:53:06 PM

Damn... I'll look into how much data recover will cost me. As for replacing my backup hdd, do you guys have any recommendations? Is there a RAID 1 drive, made by a reputable company, that's also budget-friendly?
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a c 115 G Storage
June 28, 2010 3:59:41 PM

quitetheguymi said:
Damn... I'll look into how much data recover will cost me. As for replacing my backup hdd, do you guys have any recommendations? Is there a RAID 1 drive, made by a reputable company, that's also budget-friendly?


Look at newegg.com for external RAID boxes, you will be able to sort by price, and also read the user reviews.

It will be a bit more pricy than getting one internal or external drive, but in RAID 1 you have some good backup ability.

It's hard to say what drive will or won't last 3 years, due to the fact that the have moving parts, they tend to fail. Some drives last 10 years, some don't. Unfortunatly your clicking drive is one of the ones that did not, and data recovery off those is pricy (in the thousands of dollars usually). You may be able to find a computer tech to try some tricks with it (freezing, dropping it flat) but 99% of the time the click is death to a drive.

You should expect a hard drive to fail, and make backups of what you really need accordingly.
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