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No reason for home user to use Wireless-n?

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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November 2, 2009 1:46:46 AM

So I was doing research on wireless N and I came across some problems. I have Zoomtown which the fastest speed they have is a download of 5Mbps. That's what we have right now and when i was looking around it seems to be about that for all internet minus fibre-optics. Wireless-G speed is labeled as 54 Mbps and N is ~300Mbps. Now i'm assuming I'm missing something very important somewhere because in my mind, my max is 5Mbps while Wireless-G's is 54Mbps so I'm not nearly even gonna use G to it's full potential.

Also on Speedtest it says for Cincinnati Bell (my ISP) the average speed is 17.49 Mbps. Any help would be greatly appreciated
a b F Wireless
November 2, 2009 9:35:13 PM

you would need a new provider to take advantage of g and n!
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November 3, 2009 12:53:19 AM

Well see on their page online it show the highest you can get is 5Mbps, but then why is the average on Speedtest 17.49 Mbps
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November 3, 2009 1:06:04 AM

Thanks for replying though:) 
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November 4, 2009 5:53:40 PM

My experience with Wireless G is 54Mbps is pure fantasy. It probably can occur under optimum conditions in a lab, but I've never gotten anywhere close to this in reality. Even with the computer antenna almost touching the router antenna. I typically get maybe 10 mbps on a good day. Sometimes 2 mbps is all I get.

My guess is an N network probably actually gets closer to 50mbps.
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November 11, 2009 6:07:12 PM

tuch92 said:
So I was doing research on wireless N and I came across some problems. I have Zoomtown which the fastest speed they have is a download of 5Mbps. That's what we have right now and when i was looking around it seems to be about that for all internet minus fibre-optics. Wireless-G speed is labeled as 54 Mbps and N is ~300Mbps. Now i'm assuming I'm missing something very important somewhere because in my mind, my max is 5Mbps while Wireless-G's is 54Mbps so I'm not nearly even gonna use G to it's full potential.

Also on Speedtest it says for Cincinnati Bell (my ISP) the average speed is 17.49 Mbps. Any help would be greatly appreciated



you will transferring large file on your network though , best transfer you'll get on a g network is about 11-15 mbps , on a n network between 20-40 , depending on equipment doing the transfers
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November 11, 2009 6:13:19 PM

jerry6 said:
you will transferring large file on your network though , best transfer you'll get on a g network is about 11-15 mbps , on a n network between 20-40 , depending on equipment doing the transfers


Oh! Okay thats the part I was missing. I thought they kept upgrading for purely internet sake. That makes a lot more sense. Plus I'm assuming this is for when almost everything is wireless and we'll need more bandwidth. Thanks jerry
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November 11, 2009 9:42:19 PM

Check your network's specs again, very carefully. Is the max download listed as 5mbps, or as 5MBps? The lower case mb stands for "mega bits", while the upper case MB stands for "mega BYTES". If it is MB, you should multiply that by about 10 to get megabits, while lower case does not get multiplied.http://img.tomshardware.com/forum/uk/icones/redface.gif

This isn't always well understood, or at least, not emphasized enough. When I first started downloading years ago, I couldn't figure out why I was only getting a few hundred bits per second when I was on a fast line. I finally discovered my software was reading out the download speed in BYTES per second, not bits per second. Since a BYTE is composed of about 10 bits, I learned to multiply those readings by 10 to get my true speed in bps.
http://img.tomshardware.com/forum/uk/icones/smilies/hel...
Just a thought.

Larry
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November 11, 2009 10:56:44 PM

I've double and triple checked before and its mbps not MBps. But thanks for the reply any way. And a byte is 8 bits, not 10. If they wanted to make it seem really fast, they should measure in nibbles (1/2 bit);)
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