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RAM Overclocking Question.

Last response: in Overclocking
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June 21, 2010 1:22:20 AM

Hey guys,

So I just purchased all the components to build my first computer. After reviewing my order, I notice that TigerDirect had a typo on the motherboard I purchased, found here:

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...

1600MHz DDR3 is actually OVERCLOCKING, but it doesn't say that on TigerDirect. Now I'm pissed because I bought 1600MHz RAM, and although the Motherboard Supports it (based on the specs on their site http://www.biostar-usa.com/app/en-us/mb/introduction.ph... ) I KNOW NOTHING ABOUT OVERCLOCKING.


Doesn't it void your warranty? Will it cause issues? How big of a deal is it? Is it hard to overclock the RAM? Please tell me everything!!!


Thanks so much everyone!
June 21, 2010 4:00:20 AM

It would help if you posted all your system specs. If the motherboard accepts 1600 MHz ram than it will take 1600 MHz ram.

List your specs and I can give you a better answer.
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June 21, 2010 9:18:39 AM

I wouldn't worry about it to much. Just consider it "headroom". The memory is capable of running at 1600, but will more than likely will default to 1333.
You state that you know nothing of Overclocking, so I assume your not to concerned about Bench Marks, where you might actually see the benefit of the memory turning 1600Mhz. If your a gamer then having the memory running at it's full potential would only show up on the lower end (minimum) frame rates.
But if you feel that you being ripped off you may want to do some studying on Overclocking that way you can feel like you have gotten your full money's worth.
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June 21, 2010 10:11:28 PM

Sorry for being so unclear, and thanks for the responses.


Its a biostar motherboard, which i put in the first post to the specs, and here's a link to the ram below.


NOtice that the motherboard is capable of 1800mhz and 1600Mhz, but they're both overclocking (BUT IT DOESNT SAY THIS ON TIGERDIRECT, ONLY ON THE ACTUALLY BIOSTAR SITE) :D 


http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...

So i still don't understand ram overclocking, does that mean i'd have to overlcokc my cpu also?


So sorry if i continue to be unclear guys, and i REALLY appreciate all of your input :) 

Cheers
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June 21, 2010 11:39:38 PM

Yes, you would indeed need to OC your CPU by raising the FSB (front side bus) which would make the memory speed (MHz) go higher. Keep in mind if you raise the FSB you are also turning up (OC'ing) the other components of your system (ie.... harddrives, North Bridge, ect...) and may require voltage changes + hard-setting values in the BIOS to achieve stability.
It will take a little studying. Not to mention a lot of patience!!! LOL
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June 22, 2010 12:19:07 AM

If you put that ram in your motherboard it will run at 1600 MHz as it is rated. No overclocking needed. However FSB(front side bus) to DRAM clock ratio of 1:1 is optimal. So if your FSB is lower that your ram clock speed, 1600, in this case everything is fine. There is only minimal gains in having a ratio of say 2:3 which is about what I think your system would run at. This is not a problem. It is never good to underclock your ram to make the 1:1 ratio.

Simple version is: Your ram will run at 1600 and that is just fine. It does give you headroom to overclock your CPU if you ever wanted to do that.
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June 22, 2010 2:34:12 AM

gopack said:
If you put that ram in your motherboard it will run at 1600 MHz as it is rated. No overclocking needed. However FSB(front side bus) to DRAM clock ratio of 1:1 is optimal. So if your FSB is lower that your ram clock speed, 1600, in this case everything is fine. There is only minimal gains in having a ratio of say 2:3 which is about what I think your system would run at. This is not a problem. It is never good to underclock your ram to make the 1:1 ratio.

Simple version is: Your ram will run at 1600 and that is just fine. It does give you headroom to overclock your CPU if you ever wanted to do that.



gopack are you sure? even if it says that 1600mhz is overclocking for the mobo, if i put it in, it will not require anything? but will run at that speed? unclefester above you said that i'd need to do all kinds of stuff haha
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June 22, 2010 7:35:53 AM

I don't have enough idea computer hardware. So i can't help you. Thanks
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June 22, 2010 7:57:09 AM

Go in there and if you need to overclock it and just lower the multiplier unless you need turbo boost, If you have no other choice.
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June 22, 2010 9:43:48 AM

Your RAM, at 1:1, should be running at 1,333MHz, which gives you plenty of headroom. The system bus (originally Front-Side Bus, now Quick Path Interconnect since Intel moved off the shared bus arch) is what the various system components use to talk to each other.

You can either play around with the memory ratios to get the memory up to its rated speed (but the only difference will be, as stated by UncleFester, in minimum frame rates), or you can push the bus speed up (and overclock the CPU), or you can leave it as is until Intel releases a 1600MHz chip. Something to remember is that when the RAM is running at a lower speed than the maximum rated, it allows for MUCH tighter latencies, which more than offset performance losses resulting from a lower speed.

I found this out the hard way, which is why my 5.2GHz-proven P4 spent most of its time running at 4.6 instead. This effect is noticed when benchmarking at a range of different speeds and settings, and is why you will get a gradual increase, then a large jump, another gradual increase, jump, etc...

as an aside, that CPU could have gone higher, if I'd wanted to destroy it with LN2 - which I did not. Highest I had it was 5.5, but it wasn't completing a boot due to thermal shutdown. That thing was rock stable for 4 years, until Feb this year, when the motherboard finally died. P4 631, incidentally the same chip those Italians used to crack 8GHz.

On RAM "underclocking": JEDEC specifications on DDR3-1600 REQUIRES backwards compatibility with 1333MHz (and lower) speeds, so the timing/latencies for all the different speeds are hard-coded into the SPD. Unless we are dealing with this so-called "SLI" RAM, or the stuff with the EPP data in the SPD (basically the same, only different), which is non-standard and not covered by JEDEC. I do not know much about EPP/"SLI" RAM, due to lack of experience and/or interest.

JEDEC, btw, are the people who actually lay down the standards for RAM. This "GDDR" in graphics cards is usually NOT JEDEC certified, generally because it works using standards optimised for graphics - hence the G.

Also, if you have 1333MHz, 1600MHz and 1066MHz RAM mixed on the same board, it defaults to the speed of the slowest unit. Ditto latencies.

Overclocking itself can have mixed rewards, depending on how well it was done and how much attention to detail there was. There should be a thread stickied on how to OC, so I won't repost that. I have not yet attempted to actually overclock an i7-based CPU yet, since those suckers have such a high IPC to start off with there is not really any point to it (yet)...

Oh, the FIRST thing you do BEFORE screwing around with overclocking is to ensure that the system cooling is up to the task - and there is no such a thing as overkill when it comes to cooling. Underkill, on the other hand...

Realistically, though, you're not going to see much of a difference between 1333 and 1600MHz UNLESS your CPU is running at a 1600MHz bus as well.

Where it comes to warranties, if they have overclocking support, then it is (usually) covered. They stop covering it when people start mucking about with dry ice or LN2, or when it has physical damage (usually localised discoloration) as a result of heat, or when OEM heatsinks get removed (excluding CPU heatsink, since that goes with the CPU and not the motherboard). Take all appropriate precautions and you should not have a warranty problem.

Hope this helps...
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