Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

1055T Speedfan

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
June 27, 2010 7:36:00 PM

Hello guys.

I just overclocked my AMD Thuban 1055T from 2.8Ghz to 3.31Ghz. I ran Burn-in on Si-Software(stress test on low) for an hour and a half or so and everything seems fine. Although since i had to reinstall my Windows 7 64bit (a few days ago or so,PS! does not have anything to do with the overclock since i did it today), Speedfan has not picked up readings clearly.

So i have 4 temperature readings on my Speedfan program. I have:

Temp 1: 43C

Temp 2: 34C

Temp 3: -128C (I have no idea what that's about, been like this before reinstall to)

Core: 0C (This one showed about 33C-45C before, now it doesn't show anything)

And so my question is, does my system temps seem stable, and why doesn't the core temp show?

//Daniel

More about : 1055t speedfan

a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
June 27, 2010 7:53:36 PM

I hate speedfan, it has never worked right for me, and as I only need monitoring functions (my fans run at 100% all the time) there are other programs that can be used.

CoreTemp .99.7 apparently has all the temp bugs fixed with AMD x6 chips, so if you are using speedfan just to monitor temps (and not touching fan profiles) considering trying coretemp.

A "stress test on low" seems like quite the contradictions... if you are going to use a stress test to gauge stability, I strongly suggest you use the highest stress options available, as anything less is cheating yourself out of opportunities to make it crash. Stress testing is about trying to make your system configuration fail. Stability can only be achieved when you can't make it crash.
June 27, 2010 8:21:47 PM

JofaMang said:
I hate speedfan, it has never worked right for me, and as I only need monitoring functions (my fans run at 100% all the time) there are other programs that can be used.

CoreTemp .99.7 apparently has all the temp bugs fixed with AMD x6 chips, so if you are using speedfan just to monitor temps (and not touching fan profiles) considering trying coretemp.

A "stress test on low" seems like quite the contradictions... if you are going to use a stress test to gauge stability, I strongly suggest you use the highest stress options available, as anything less is cheating yourself out of opportunities to make it crash. Stress testing is about trying to make your system configuration fail. Stability can only be achieved when you can't make it crash.


Thanks for the answer. Il try to run the stresstest on high over night (any program/s you suggest).

Also i ran passmark performance test to see if i would get a higher score (my previous was something like 1660) and at the first test it failed (never happened before, the admin for passmark said that ESPECIALLY Phenom II overclocked can cause these problems) so i restarted the test. And all went well, but this time i got a score of 970 or so, what´s up with that? :) 

So, do you suggest any performance test programs for testing the whole computer, that does not take that long?

Thanx again for the help.

// Daniel
Related resources
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
June 27, 2010 8:59:19 PM

Fair warning: Using the CPU cooler that came with the chip will limit how much of a safe overclock you can achieve. An aftermarket cooler can provide a HUGE performance increase over stock. One must remember, admitting to overclocking your CPU and/or using an aftermarket HSF will void your warranty, should you try to make a claim on a failed CPU.

KNow the limits of your CPU as far voltage and temperature are concerned, so that you can confidently know if your Overclock is exponentially increasing your risk of hardware failure.

-Memtest86+ for testing the memory (you make a bootdisc and it runs itself) - 4-8 passes is generally considered a solid indicator of stable memory settings.
-Intel Burn Test - good for CPU and memory testing, can route out instability very fast
-Prime95 - Small FFTs for strong heat production and CPU specific stress, Blend for CPU + memory testing. Takes a long time to really route out instability (1-6hours minimum, depending on who you ask, though some won't consider a setup stable without 12+ hours)

Here is a decent primer on CPU stability:
http://alienbabeltech.com/main/?p=16945
June 27, 2010 9:27:56 PM

JofaMang said:
Fair warning: Using the CPU cooler that came with the chip will limit how much of a safe overclock you can achieve. An aftermarket cooler can provide a HUGE performance increase over stock. One must remember, admitting to overclocking your CPU and/or using an aftermarket HSF will void your warranty, should you try to make a claim on a failed CPU.

KNow the limits of your CPU as far voltage and temperature are concerned, so that you can confidently know if your Overclock is exponentially increasing your risk of hardware failure.

-Memtest86+ for testing the memory (you make a bootdisc and it runs itself) - 4-8 passes is generally considered a solid indicator of stable memory settings.
-Intel Burn Test - good for CPU and memory testing, can route out instability very fast
-Prime95 - Small FFTs for strong heat production and CPU specific stress, Blend for CPU + memory testing. Takes a long time to really route out instability (1-6hours minimum, depending on who you ask, though some won't consider a setup stable without 12+ hours)

Here is a decent primer on CPU stability:
http://alienbabeltech.com/main/?p=16945


Thanks for the advice. Im gonna run IBT over night to see how my CPU manages. I tried CoreTemp but that neither wants to show any temperatures. Is there anything in the BIOS i might have accidentally changed (maybe disabled something), and if so what would that be?

I appreciate the help :) 

// Daniel
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
June 27, 2010 11:01:46 PM

Have you updated your motherboard bios since you got the x6? If not, that could be part of your problem.
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
June 27, 2010 11:31:31 PM

A Bios update should fix the problem, especially if the Coretemp file he is using is newer than his Bios.
June 28, 2010 1:14:26 PM

JofaMang said:
Have you updated your motherboard bios since you got the x6? If not, that could be part of your problem.


I have heard BIOS updates should only be done to fix problems with your computer otherwise you should leave it as it is, is this true?

I was going to update my BIOS (i did have a little problem figuring my way in the ASUS website though :)  but then i read that it can be unsafe.

Any suggestions on this matter?

Once again, thanks for the help :) 

// Daniel
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
June 28, 2010 2:08:51 PM

It is risky, only in that a power failure during the flash process, or flashing with the wrong bios, can leave your motherboard bricked and unusable. Be sure you have the right bios for your motherboard, and follow the instructions that the manufacturer supplies.

It is widely known that installing hexacore CPUs requires the latest bios to properly utilize. In this situation, you have a problem, and it will most likely be fixed by updating your bios.
June 28, 2010 2:51:57 PM

JofaMang said:
It is risky, only in that a power failure during the flash process, or flashing with the wrong bios, can leave your motherboard bricked and unusable. Be sure you have the right bios for your motherboard, and follow the instructions that the manufacturer supplies.

It is widely known that installing hexacore CPUs requires the latest bios to properly utilize. In this situation, you have a problem, and it will most likely be fixed by updating your bios.


Ok, thanks for all the help, i really appreciate it.

// Daniel
!