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Cooler fans

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June 29, 2010 7:00:44 AM

pc specs
e5400 OC'd to 3.25Ghz
MSI G31M3 Mobo
GTS 250 palit e green (about the same performance as a 9800 gtx)
2 GB ddr2 ram (PC6400)
550 watt great wall power supply
Win XP pro SP3
19" LCD at 1440X900
playing games such as GTA4, Bioshock 2, Last Remnant, and more games when they come out.

im thinking of getting two of these:
http://www.dcomponline.com.au/productview.asp?proid=749... (i will only buy it from here, NO WHERE ELSE!)

and this:
http://www.dcomponline.com.au/productview.asp?proid=748...

but for the two fans i dont know where to put them...

should i put one on the rear and suck air out? and maybe one on the bottom to suck air in and blow it directly on top of my gts 250?

More about : cooler fans

a b K Overclocking
June 29, 2010 7:08:33 AM

Links are broken.
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June 29, 2010 7:12:52 AM

Pyroflea said:
Links are broken.


dammit
sorry for that
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June 29, 2010 10:25:13 AM

alhanelem said:
pc specs
e5400 OC'd to 3.25Ghz
MSI G31M3 Mobo
GTS 250 palit e green (about the same performance as a 9800 gtx)
2 GB ddr2 ram (PC6400)
550 watt great wall power supply
Win XP pro SP3
19" LCD at 1440X900
playing games such as GTA4, Bioshock 2, Last Remnant, and more games when they come out.

im thinking of getting two of these:
http://www.dcomponline.com.au/productview.asp?proid=749... (i will only buy it from here, NO WHERE ELSE!)

and this:
http://www.dcomponline.com.au/productview.asp?proid=748...

but for the two fans i dont know where to put them...

should i put one on the rear and suck air out? and maybe one on the bottom to suck air in and blow it directly on top of my gts 250?


Generally you want more exhaust than intake since the air inside the case will be hotter than outside. Just get a program that displays the current temperatures of the CPU, GPU(s), northbridge, southbridge, and motherboard. All of these have thermometers that the right program can display (such as ASUS's PC Probe 2), then try various fan routings and see what gives your system the best results.
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a b K Overclocking
June 29, 2010 2:36:02 PM

All depends on your case (didn't see it listed). You definitely want to populate all of your exhaust fan locations to maximize the removal of hot air that builds up in the system. These exhaust fans typically pull air through the case and send it out the rear of the system.

If you case allows it, you also want to populate any positions in the front of the case. These typically pull cool air into the case.

You also want to look at air flow to ensure you have an unobstructed flow (to the maximum extent possible) by moving cables, etc from being directly adjacent to fans.

The major caveat here is that your fans may blow across your HDDs (once again, case dependent) to help keep them cool. This is a good thing.

Bottom mounted fans, as you suggest, can be good choices as they often direct air directly towards the GPU. Just make sure you have a good clean surface under your system so that you don't blow dust bunnies and hair balls directly into your GPU.

Last, don't place your system in a cabinet that restricts airflow. This will lead to an early demise as components overheat.

Good luck!
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June 30, 2010 8:37:19 AM

COLGeek said:
All depends on your case (didn't see it listed). You definitely want to populate all of your exhaust fan locations to maximize the removal of hot air that builds up in the system. These exhaust fans typically pull air through the case and send it out the rear of the system.

If you case allows it, you also want to populate any positions in the front of the case. These typically pull cool air into the case.

You also want to look at air flow to ensure you have an unobstructed flow (to the maximum extent possible) by moving cables, etc from being directly adjacent to fans.

The major caveat here is that your fans may blow across your HDDs (once again, case dependent) to help keep them cool. This is a good thing.

Bottom mounted fans, as you suggest, can be good choices as they often direct air directly towards the GPU. Just make sure you have a good clean surface under your system so that you don't blow dust bunnies and hair balls directly into your GPU.

Last, don't place your system in a cabinet that restricts airflow. This will lead to an early demise as components overheat.

Good luck!


If what you say is true then im really gonna need to find a new place for my pc, since its in a space underneath my table on top of some wood since i already knew carpet was bad for my pc (or any electronic device) and it has some ventilation but i think it would be better if it was on top of my table not underneath it, but then id need space on my table which might be a little tricky.
also my case is a Tsunami 2105B Black ATX Case
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a b K Overclocking
June 30, 2010 11:06:59 AM

Under table is fine as long as it is not fully enclosed. I have seen PCs placed inside fully enclosed entertainment centers that became almost like small ovens because there was no airflow. If the front of your PC is open to the room and the back of the PC exhausts freeley, you should be fine where it is. Just don't "put it in a box".
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June 30, 2010 12:00:59 PM

COLGeek said:
Under table is fine as long as it is not fully enclosed. I have seen PCs placed inside fully enclosed entertainment centers that became almost like small ovens because there was no airflow. If the front of your PC is open to the room and the back of the PC exhausts freeley, you should be fine where it is. Just don't "put it in a box".


ok then, the front easily has enough room, the back has some room too and its not close to the wall either, also the side of the case where the cpu sucks in air has room as well.
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a b K Overclocking
June 30, 2010 1:15:27 PM

You should be fine. Just look at the fan recommendations made earlier and adapt to fit your particular case and you will be good to go.

From what I could find on the 'Net, you case supports:
1x8cm at side, 1x8cm or 12cm at back

The front and back are easy. The side (blows on the CPU), you have to be careful with fan <> heatsink clearance. You also have to consider the difficulty of routing the wiring for the side mounted fan so it doesn't get in the way when removing and re-installing the side.

Good luck!
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July 1, 2010 5:25:57 AM

COLGeek said:
You should be fine. Just look at the fan recommendations made earlier and adapt to fit your particular case and you will be good to go.

From what I could find on the 'Net, you case supports:
1x8cm at side, 1x8cm or 12cm at back

The front and back are easy. The side (blows on the CPU), you have to be careful with fan <> heatsink clearance. You also have to consider the difficulty of routing the wiring for the side mounted fan so it doesn't get in the way when removing and re-installing the side.

Good luck!


Thanks, maybe i should get some extra fans and place them around like next to my ram and northbridge/southbridge.
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a b K Overclocking
July 1, 2010 1:49:41 PM

If you can mount them safely (so they won't move) and not damage anything, then sure. There are small fans you can mount right to the NB.
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July 1, 2010 1:53:04 PM

COLGeek said:
If you can mount them safely (so they won't move) and not damage anything, then sure. There are small fans you can mount right to the NB.


i saw someone use a plastic cord which locks when you loop it and i found the same thing in my room, gonna buy a 4cm fan and use it too cool my north bridge and since its big enough it may even blow some air on my ram too.

edit: lol, i just googled it and found out the plastic cord is called a zip tie.

PS: this is what my mobo looks like

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!