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Booting a new Computer did not detect the hard drives when AHCI set in CMOS

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Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 20, 2010 2:23:34 AM

I am booting up a newly built computer with 2 x 1TB hard drives; my CMOS (Award Software) settings were set to AHCI for "PCH SATA control mode", "eSATA Ctrl Mode" and & "GSATA Ctrl Mode". My hard drives were not detected (by WD Data Lifeguard Diagnostic booted from CD ROM drive).

I switched them IDE and they were.

:ange: 
a b G Storage
July 20, 2010 6:11:21 AM

Yes. That is quite normal. Even I wasn't able to do that when i got my new HDD. I think you have to install AHCI drivers before doing that. If you are using XP, then it would certainly be the case. You have to install AHCI drivers only during installation of XP.
Check out this link and let us know if it helps!

http://forum.msi.com.tw/index.php?topic=106575.0

But i think the link is modified for MSI motherboards.
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a b G Storage
July 20, 2010 5:14:02 PM

It is a pretty normal thing - if you're using Windows 7, there are AHCI drivers built in.

If you are using Windows XP, you'll need to use a floppy drive and press F6 during install to add RAID drivers, etc
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a b G Storage
July 21, 2010 6:39:32 AM

Just wanted to know that, since floppy drives are obsolete... can this be done through USB drive?
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a b G Storage
July 21, 2010 6:22:41 PM

On XP, the answer is no. You have to use a floppy (you can use a USB floppy as well). On Win7/Vista, I believe you can use a USB drive, but many drivers are built in and can be updated post OS install.
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Anonymous
a b G Storage
July 21, 2010 9:09:51 PM

Quote:
I am booting up a newly built computer with 2 x 1TB hard drives; my CMOS (Award Software) settings were set to AHCI for "PCH SATA control mode", "eSATA Ctrl Mode" and & "GSATA Ctrl Mode". My hard drives were not detected (by WD Data Lifeguard Diagnostic booted from CD ROM drive).

I switched them IDE and they were.

After I installed WIndows 7 (64 bit), I installed chipset drivers that included AHCI(drivers).
But when I switched CMOS to AHCI, again a problem!?!?!

:ange: 

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July 21, 2010 10:22:51 PM

Quote:
After I installed WIndows 7 (64 bit), I installed chipset drivers that included AHCI(drivers).
But when I switched CMOS to AHCI, again a problem!?!?!


The best way is to set it to AHCI in bios and then install Windows 7. If it is set to IDE when installing you will have to manually change a registry value to enable the AHCI driver, since Windows has disabled it when not detected under install.

Check this Microsoft knowledgebase article:

http://support.microsoft.com/?scid=kb;en-us;922976&x=16&y=12
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a c 99 G Storage
July 21, 2010 10:36:11 PM

^+1: Agree!

You can't install OS with SATA set to IDE, then change it to ACHI without reinstalling the OS, or doing the registry tweak.

You hard drive weren't detected by what? The OS? During install? No, you said "by WD Data Lifeguard Diagnostic booted from CD ROM drive." This doen't mean Windows won't see them!

When installing a new hard drive, Windows won't see it until the drive is formatted! This is NOT the case during OS install. Install will find them.

Set your SATA ports to ACHI, and go with it.
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a b G Storage
July 22, 2010 12:29:37 AM

> You can't install OS with SATA set to IDE, then change it to ACHI without reinstalling the OS, or doing the registry tweak.


That is not entirely correct.

If you know what you're doing, it's possible for FORCE
a change in the device driver from IDE to AHCI,
by using functions within Device Manager.

The OS will complain, but at this point that's GOOD!

After that change, one must immediately re-boot
into the BIOS and switch the mode to AHCI.

Then, the OS should load the AHCI device driver
instead of the former IDE driver.

I've done this with an Intel chipset, and
it worked fine.


Switching from either IDE or AHCI to RAID mode
is not that easy, however, because RAID mode
requires that all component drives be initialized
by the Option ROM (unlike native IDE and AHCI settings).


One approach, that I have seen work, is this:

(0) backup all private data files first, as a precaution;

(1) boot into the BIOS and set RAID mode;

(2) boot into the Option ROM and initialize
all component drives as JBOD (non-RAID);

(3) re-install the OS by choosing the Repair option,
withOUT re-formatting the OS partition;

(4) during step (3) above, use F6 to load the
RAID device driver: for XP, the necessary files
are these:

C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\iaStor.sys
C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\iaStor.cat
C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\iaStor.inf

(5) as soon as step (4) has finished, be sure
to bring all OS files up-to-date by running
Windows Update;

(6) optionally, download from Intel and install
the Intel Matrix Storage Console: this should
come with Intel's latest "Rapid Storage Technology"
aka "RST" version 9.6 (last time I looked).

Google site:www.intel.com "Rapid Storage Technology" +"9.6"

... and find this:

http://www.intel.com/p/en_US/support/highlights/chpsts/...

"imsm" is the former acronym for Intel Matrix Storage Manager.


MRFS

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a b G Storage
July 22, 2010 12:40:04 AM

Here is what the Intel Matrix Storage Console version 8.8 looks like
when the BIOS and device driver are correctly initialized to RAID:




Note that I have both RAID and non-RAID (JBOD) devices attached
to the ICH7R controller on that particular machine:

the RAID array combines 2 x SSDs in RAID 0; and,
there are 2 non-RAID Hard Drives, as shown.

Port numbers start at port 0.

I haven't updated this software in quite a while, because it works AOK.

Repeating, the latest version of Intel's RST is 9.6 (see above).


MRFS
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