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Cpu blows breaker

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April 15, 2009 10:21:11 PM

my cpu blows the house breaker , i've replaced the power supply it still blows the breaker help someone

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a c 897 à CPUs
a c 715 ) Power supply
April 15, 2009 10:47:49 PM

Try a different socket. Maybe you have a short.
a b à CPUs
a b ) Power supply
April 15, 2009 11:28:01 PM

too much load on the same breaker?? (but man u'll need one hell of a system)
unplugg everything else...
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April 16, 2009 8:00:41 AM

emmaus said:
my cpu blows the house breaker , i've replaced the power supply it still blows the breaker help someone

Something is VERY wrong. Last time that happened to one of our computers, smoke started pouring out, and the motherboard and video card were burnt to a crisp. I would suggest shaking the case around and listen for moving screws etc, they might be touching a solder join on the motherboard and shorting it out.
a b à CPUs
April 16, 2009 8:25:54 AM

question one - did you build the system your self?
April 16, 2009 8:30:18 AM

apache_lives said:
question one - did you build the system your self?

I'm guessing that he/she did, as he/she would have rung up the store they bought the PC from as soon as this problem arose, and would have had it replaced on warranty. Also, seeing as they replaced the PSU, they probably have SOME kind of expertise in that area. Although they did refer to the PC as a "CPU" which is worrying...
a b à CPUs
April 16, 2009 11:57:37 AM

Guys, it blew a house breaker. Too much amps comming out of one line; either take stuff off whatever line the PC is plugged into, or plug the PC into a diffrent line.

I had to get a 120 amp dedicated lines put into my room to run all my stuff; if you have a lot of electronics, this can happen.
a b à CPUs
April 16, 2009 1:05:38 PM

gamerk316 said:
Guys, it blew a house breaker. Too much amps comming out of one line; either take stuff off whatever line the PC is plugged into, or plug the PC into a diffrent line..



THIS


Too much stuff plugged into one place. Move some things off of that circuit.

a c 897 à CPUs
a c 715 ) Power supply
April 16, 2009 11:02:25 PM

gamerk316; 120x110=13200watts, would not want to pay your electric bill
April 17, 2009 4:53:55 AM

rolli59 said:
gamerk316; 120x110=13200watts, would not want to pay your electric bill

:lol: 
a b à CPUs
a b ) Power supply
April 17, 2009 5:09:23 AM

gamerk316 said:
Guys, it blew a house breaker. Too much amps comming out of one line; either take stuff off whatever line the PC is plugged into, or plug the PC into a diffrent line.

I had to get a 120 amp dedicated lines put into my room to run all my stuff; if you have a lot of electronics, this can happen.


WTF? 120amps? There is no reason anyone needs 120amps into a single room. I don't care how much electronics you have in there. That's simply ridiculous. Do you realize what gauge wire you'd have to run for 120amps? We're not talking standard wall outlet here...

Anyhow, for the OP:

I'd try turning some items off in the room, or simply unplugging stuff. Most household wall outlets are connected to either a 15amp or 20amp breaker. Sometimes they can be shared from room to room, depending on how your builder originally installed the electrical. If you have to much stuff plugged in, you can draw more than the 15 or 20 amps and trip the breaker off.

Also, if the specific breaker you're talking about is a GFCI breaker (it'll have a "Test" button on it), you will also want to check for any electrical short circuits. An example would be loose screws as mentioned earlier. Metal contacting the wrong place, can cause electricity to go to ground, thereby causing the GFCI to trip off for safety reasons.

Worst case scenario: Move your PC into a different area of the house and try again. If you get the same results, there's something likely wrong with your PC.

If you only have problems with that one breaker, you may need to contact an electrician to be sure there's not a wiring problem.
April 17, 2009 6:02:21 AM

i know in my place when i have to much power being drawn in certain parts of the house it will blow the breaker to one part or to all the house so it might not just be your computer it could be other stuff in the house especially if ur house hasnt been rewired in like 50 years cause mine hasnt
a b à CPUs
April 17, 2009 7:58:34 AM

jerreece said:
WTF? 120amps? There is no reason anyone needs 120amps into a single room. I don't care how much electronics you have in there. That's simply ridiculous. Do you realize what gauge wire you'd have to run for 120amps? We're not talking standard wall outlet here...

Anyhow, for the OP:

I'd try turning some items off in the room, or simply unplugging stuff. Most household wall outlets are connected to either a 15amp or 20amp breaker. Sometimes they can be shared from room to room, depending on how your builder originally installed the electrical. If you have to much stuff plugged in, you can draw more than the 15 or 20 amps and trip the breaker off.

Also, if the specific breaker you're talking about is a GFCI breaker (it'll have a "Test" button on it), you will also want to check for any electrical short circuits. An example would be loose screws as mentioned earlier. Metal contacting the wrong place, can cause electricity to go to ground, thereby causing the GFCI to trip off for safety reasons.

Worst case scenario: Move your PC into a different area of the house and try again. If you get the same results, there's something likely wrong with your PC.

If you only have problems with that one breaker, you may need to contact an electrician to be sure there's not a wiring problem.


He probably just made a typo, or a lack of knowledge about amps might have lead to mistaking 120A for 20A. Anyway, lots of people are limitted to 15A, so 20A is a common upgrade.

Assuming his home voltage is "only" 110V (hardly anyone gets real 120), 15A would be 1650W. Super high-end PC's can draw 800W (I've NEVER seen more than 900W even with dual GTX 295's and max Core i7 OC), so you'd still have at least 800W left.


April 17, 2009 10:32:38 AM

If the breaker trips as soon as he turns on the computer then he has some kind of short in the machine.
a b à CPUs
April 17, 2009 11:28:00 AM

baddad said:
If the breaker trips as soon as he turns on the computer then he has some kind of short in the machine.


If he had a short like that, the machine would be toast by now.
April 17, 2009 11:46:02 AM

Crashman said:
If he had a short like that, the machine would be toast by now.

Agreed. There's something up with the power going to his house, or at least his room. You should get in an electrician to check out the wiring of your house.
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