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Strip size?

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July 20, 2010 7:21:55 PM

I just bought a second spintpoint f3 500 for my asus p7p55d-e pro mobo. When the utility for it runs it recommends 128kb for strip size, but ive heard that you should set to 64. Whats the difference this will create?

Sorry forgot to say this is for raid0

More about : strip size

July 20, 2010 8:28:15 PM

Here are some benchmarks i got with it, but i notice sometimes it drops significantly:



Is something wrong with my harddrives?
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July 21, 2010 3:53:50 AM

bumb? anyone? thanks in advance.
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July 21, 2010 4:01:51 AM

bavman said:
I just bought a second spintpoint f3 500 for my asus p7p55d-e pro mobo. When the utility for it runs it recommends 128kb for strip size, but ive heard that you should set to 64. Whats the difference this will create?

Sorry forgot to say this is for raid0



depending what you use your hard drive for gaming files or graphics or large size files you want to set it at the highest strip size. For instance if you use 128kb strip size and have 448kb files you need around 3 files as opposed to setting it at 512kb which makes it one file but you lose the remaing 52kb but its faster having 1 file than 3 its more effecient. You don't want to use 512kb sectors and have 128kb files because your wasting 384kb that is lost space. you want to basically cram all that gram!
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July 21, 2010 8:10:46 AM

GunBladeType-T said:
depending what you use your hard drive for gaming files or graphics or large size files you want to set it at the highest strip size. For instance if you use 128kb strip size and have 448kb files you need around 3 files as opposed to setting it at 512kb which makes it one file but you lose the remaing 52kb but its faster having 1 file than 3 its more effecient. You don't want to use 512kb sectors and have 128kb files because your wasting 384kb that is lost space. you want to basically cram all that gram!


Is that really true that you lose disk space due to the stripe size? For me the stripe size is a hardware feature that is invisible to the operating system, and the OS creates a logical file system with certain cluster sizes on top of the physical drive (RAID or not). Some space could be lost in too large cluster sizes, but I do not think because of the stripe size.
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July 21, 2010 11:54:55 AM

When you setp up Raid with the uitlity you select what size cluster you want anywhere from 64kb-512kb 128 is recommended for normal use or higher for gaming and photoshop files!
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July 21, 2010 12:21:22 PM

GunBladeType-T said:
When you setp up Raid with the uitlity you select what size cluster you want anywhere from 64kb-512kb 128 is recommended for normal use or higher for gaming and photoshop files!


But I still think that the RAID stripe size and the file system cluster size is two different things.

The whole RAID set will look like one hard drive for the operating system where it could create partitions and format with a filesystem like NTFS. I do think that "lost" space comes only from the logical filesystem and not from the physical stripe size of the RAID set.

Anyone who can verify what is correct?
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July 21, 2010 9:33:59 PM

Well i have it set up to 128, i looked at a picture file details, and it says 108kb, size on disk: 112
From what i understood it should have been 128 or some multiple of that?
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July 21, 2010 10:13:37 PM

bavman said:
Well i have it set up to 128, i looked at a picture file details, and it says 108kb, size on disk: 112
From what i understood it should have been 128 or some multiple of that?


No, since I belive that it is not correct what has been written above. The stripe size is invisible from the operating system standpoint, but it uses its own clusters as the way to allocate space for files.

For Windows the cluster size will in practice always be 4kb. Your file is probably 108kb + some bytes, which makes it necessary to use one more cluster, therefore the extra 4kb for the file.

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a c 99 G Storage
July 21, 2010 10:23:48 PM

@OP: your benchmarks drop because you begin accessing data from the inner parts of the hard drive platter, which is moving "slower" than the out parts of the hard drice platter: less data is accessed per platter rotation, due to decreasing size in platter diameter.

This is normal!

You 128K stripe size, as recommended, and forget about any "lost" clusters. You have 1TB of space! You'll never miss 4KB of space on 1TB available!
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a b Ĉ ASUS
a c 167 G Storage
July 21, 2010 11:29:47 PM

The stripe size tells the raid controller how much data to allocate on a drive before allocating the same stripe size on the other drive.

It will make very little difference in performance unless the stripe size is abnormally small.


What do you hope to achieve with raid-0?
Synthetic benchmarks look impressive, but in everyday usage there is little, if any, improvement in performance.
If your app reads lots of large files consecutively, then raid-0 is a good idea.
The other good reason for raid-0 is to increase the size of a single image for easier management. Something you might do when expanding to two small SSD's.
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July 22, 2010 12:52:31 AM

Well the reason i put them in raid 0 was because i wanted to expand anyways, 500gb just wanst cutting it for me, so i figured if i put it in raid 0 maybe ill get a little performance boost here and there, but i get 1tb instead of 500gb. The only thing i dont like is the annoying intel raid screen that comes up when bios loads.
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