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Need help OC Phenom II X4 945

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a b K Overclocking
July 16, 2010 7:58:34 AM

Mobo: Biostar TA790GX 128M+
CPU: Phenom II X4 945 C2 Deneb
HSF: Titan Fenrir Limited Edition
RAM: OCZ Fatal1ty DDR2-800 5-4-4-18 @2.1v
GPU: PNY GTS 250 1GB
PSU: OCZ MXSP 700W (+12v @ 25A) x 2

Problem 1:
Last night I started to OC my rig. I was able to get to only 220 on the FSB with 15x3000 MHz. After reading up a little more on how to properly OC, I was able to get my computer to load the OS (Win7 64) at 230 FSB with 15x3000. I ran Prime 95 for 25 minutes and no errors. After this, I attempted 235, but no matter how many times I bump up the vCore; lower the RAM speed; and loosen the timings, I could not load the OS. Here are the settings that got me to 3.45GHz and stable with Prime 95 (albeit for a short time):

FSB: 230
vCore: +.060
RAM: 5-4-4-18, 667, 2.110v
Cmd Rate: 2T

Problem 2:
Somewhat settling for the 3.45GHz OC, I tried to play World of Warcraft, the computer crashed at the log in screen, nearly instantly. I'm confused as to why I can have 100% load on the CPU at 3.45GHz, but I can't play WoW... I lowered the FSB to 220 and changed the BIOS settings back to what worked earlier (above). Restarted. Windows loaded. Attempted WoW again. I was able to select my character, but while in the loading screen, my computer crashed (BSOD). Naturally, I tried bumping up the vcore and adjusting the RAM settings, but to no avail. I lowered the FSB to 215. Restarted. Attempted WoW again. This time, the game froze at the log in screen. I could still move my mouse, but nothing else worked. I lowered the FSB back to stock, 200 MHz so I could post this request for help.

I have cool and quiet disabled. I have been bumping up the FSB by 5 MHz each time to find that I can't load the OS with an FSB higher than 233.

Questions? Comments? Solutions?

More about : phenom 945

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a c 291 K Overclocking
July 16, 2010 3:32:47 PM

Also disable the C1E.
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a b K Overclocking
July 16, 2010 3:46:29 PM

Have you lowered your Northbridge and HT muliplier? Those are also affected by the fsb, and you may be loosing stability in those places. Just try to keep them close to stock values. HT link may be reported as an end value (2000mhz) instead of the muliplier (x10) and a stock fsb value of 200. If so, just divide the value by 200 to get the actual multi.
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a b K Overclocking
July 16, 2010 5:16:11 PM

Thank you both. I will try these when I get home.

@JofaMang

Just for clarity, my NB is stock 2000 MHz and the HT is stock [Auto]. So if I understand you correctly, you are suggesting that I lower the NB to get it close to 200 MHz?

I apologize in advance if my noob question misunderstands your advice.
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Best solution

a b K Overclocking
July 16, 2010 6:00:53 PM

NB multi x FSB = NB frequency. If your NB is still at 10x, with say, a FSB of 233, it will be running at 2330mhz. If HT link is set to 2000mhz, or 10x multi, it too will be running at 2330mhz. OCing the NB gives returns, but at 2300+, some voltage may be needed. At any rate, now is not the time to OC the NB, that should be left till everything else is stable. OCing the HT gives little to no return, and can easily cause instability. Try setting NB to 9x, and HT to 1800mhz (or 9x, how ever it is shown in your bios) to get them closer to stock.
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a b K Overclocking
July 16, 2010 6:40:00 PM

JofaMang said:
NB multi x FSB = NB frequency. If your NB is still at 10x, with say, a FSB of 233, it will be running at 2330mhz. If HT link is set to 2000mhz, or 10x multi, it too will be running at 2330mhz. OCing the NB gives returns, but at 2300+, some voltage may be needed. At any rate, now is not the time to OC the NB, that should be left till everything else is stable. OCing the HT gives little to no return, and can easily cause instability. Try setting NB to 9x, and HT to 1800mhz (or 9x, how ever it is shown in your bios) to get them closer to stock.


Ah... I understand now. Thank you. I will try this and let you all know how it turns out.
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a b K Overclocking
July 17, 2010 7:42:35 AM

JofaMang... Thank you for your help. I have so far successfully loaded Windows with my system overclocked to 3.9GHz.
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a b K Overclocking
July 17, 2010 7:42:53 AM

Best answer selected by T_T.
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a b K Overclocking
July 17, 2010 12:45:58 PM

I'm very glad to have helped. Now, what do you know about stability testing?
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a b K Overclocking
July 17, 2010 6:10:20 PM

According to a guide from this forum (it's about OCing a BE) I read, if 3Dmark06 provides a score, that means my OC is stable. I am going to try that later, but for now, i'm more concerned with stabilty with World of Warcraft.

I've been writing down every adjustment I made, and so far I've gone as far as reducing the NB multi to x8; increasing the NB VID (voltage right?) to 1.250v; and increasing the Vcore to .12, but still no stability with WoW.

Everytime I raise the NB VID or lower the multi, I start with the Vcore setting that got me to load the O/S. As you can see, I have no trouble loading Windows, but still can't play WoW because of the crashing.

Right now, the settings are:
Bus Speed: 260
DRAM Volt.:2.190v
Speed: 533
Timing: 5-4-4-18
Cmd Rate: 2T
NB VID: 1.1375
Vcore:.06
NB Multi: x8

Gonna try again to get WoW stable. If you have ideas of why Prime95 can put 100% load on the CPU, and stay stable for upwards of 20 minutes, but WoW crashes nearly instantly, I'd love to hear it.
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a b K Overclocking
July 18, 2010 9:37:25 PM

All right, here is what I did to finally stabalize my system (although, i still get random crashes-probably bad RAM), including WoW.

FSB: 255
NB VID: 1.100
NB Freq: 1600 (x8)
Vcore: .06
RAM Timing: 5-4-4-18
RAM: 533
Cmd Rate: 2T
DRAM V: 2.190v


Again, JofaMang, thank you for your help.
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a b K Overclocking
July 18, 2010 10:12:34 PM

There are varying degrees of stability.

Running 3dmark06 without crashing = bench stable. clocks that can survive short sessions of load, long enough to achieve a score in a benchmarking program. I have run 4.3ghz bench stable, but using that for daily would be painful at best, destructive at worst. The very extreme bench stable is being able to open CPU-Z and validate before crashing.

24/7 stable is the other extreme. This is an overclock that has been tested under heavy load for long periods of time without crashing. Prime95, Intel Burn Test, Memtest86+, Furmark, and Kombuster are examples of programs that are either known to provide large workloads on your hardware (last two are for GPU), or are designed to do so.

The CPUID tag in my sig is 24/7 stable. It has passed a lot of long term 100% load conditioning, and has never crashed on me. I also have a CPUID is that for 4.321ghz when I had a -25c breeze blowing on my old mobo last spring that crashed shortly after running 3dmark vantage, but before I could take an SS (not even bench stable, hah):


Drop your Ram to 400 (or even 333 if your ram is only rated for 800mhz), if you can, 255x5.33 = very heavily OC'd ram. Overclocking your memory pays very small dividends, most of which will not be noticeable, but can easily throw your system stability under the bus, even if the CPU is fine. I currently have my memory overclocked with tightened timings, but it has passed extended Memtest86+ and IBT stability testing.
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a b K Overclocking
July 18, 2010 10:27:34 PM

Good to know. I'll run some tests and drop the RAM to 400 (which is the lowest I can go) and see how this rig does. Thanks again.
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