Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Installing older hard drive

Tags:
  • PCS
  • Hard Drives
  • Storage
Last response: in Storage
Share
July 23, 2010 2:16:41 PM

Just bought a new PC and will be needing to transfer data from my old hard drive. Now I'm not too good with PCs but I know the basics of stuff, so will I be able to simply plug the old hard drive into the new system and be able to take the data from it immediately or will I have to mess around with it in the BIOS or whatnot first?
Also I've read about the 'slave'/'master' stuff and don't understand that, will I have to mess around with that too?
So yeah, a checklist of steps to install the older hard drive would be perfect, thanks a lot!

More about : installing older hard drive

July 23, 2010 4:00:04 PM

If it's sata just plug it in any sata port.

If it came form another windows computer you should be able to get your data off of it.
As far as master and slave don't have it pluged in sata 1 or 0, if you do you might have to fool with the bios.

When you're done you should reformat the drive ( more so if it uses FAT 32 but less if it uses the newer windows format )



Hope I helped!
a c 137 G Storage
July 23, 2010 4:02:05 PM

Easiest way is to get an external USB or eSata drive bay, and connect your old drive in that.

If your new PC has an eSata port, get that, it's quite a bit faster than USB 2.

Make sure the drive bay is for the type of hard drive you have, IDE or SATA.
Related resources
July 23, 2010 4:26:42 PM

hang-the-9 said:
Easiest way is to get an external USB or eSata drive bay, and connect your old drive in that.

If your new PC has an eSata port, get that, it's quite a bit faster than USB 2.

Make sure the drive bay is for the type of hard drive you have, IDE or SATA.


Hmm sounds like a good idea, but I have no idea where I'm looking for one of these so could you link me to one if possible? I'm from the UK btw.
Thanks
a c 137 G Storage
July 23, 2010 5:09:12 PM

crumble114 said:
Hmm sounds like a good idea, but I have no idea where I'm looking for one of these so could you link me to one if possible? I'm from the UK btw.
Thanks


Something like this http://www.vantecusa.com/gl/product/index/64

Any computer shop would have this type of device.
July 23, 2010 9:05:03 PM

Okay brilliant, thanks.
Also, I know that my motherboard has USB3.0 support so would getting the USB3.0 device be quicker than using e-SATA?
a c 137 G Storage
July 23, 2010 9:18:52 PM

crumble114 said:
Okay brilliant, thanks.
Also, I know that my motherboard has USB3.0 support so would getting the USB3.0 device be quicker than using e-SATA?


That I don't know. I think USB 3 and esata are about the same, there are benchmarks around for that I'm sure, I just have not looked into it.
a c 353 G Storage
July 23, 2010 9:42:25 PM

USB3 vs esata - does not make a difference as your HDD is slower than either one - But Faster than USB2. Just make sure that on the inside of the enclosure the connector matches your HDD (IDE=40 pin ribbion cable / SATA = small round cable)

Added - Make sure that enclosure comes with a Power adaptor. If you end up using USB2, it can not power a 3 1/2 inch HDD (SATA III should) and estata does not carry power.
a c 367 G Storage
July 26, 2010 9:07:12 PM

As several have advised, mounting the old HDD in an external case can be useful, but also has disadvantages. Retired Chief made two excellent points:
1. In buying an enclosure in which to mount a HDD, you need to consider two interfaces. The external one is between enclosure and computer. USB2 is a VERY common port on most computers. eSATA is significantly faster, and USB3 is just as fast as that, IF you have either of those ports available on your new machine. Many enclosures have two of these interfaces built in - some even have IEEE 1394a (aka Firewire 400), too. The second interface is the internal one - between enclosure and HDD. MUST match what HDD type you have - two choices: either IDE (or PATA), or SATA. An IDE HDD has a 2" wide data ribbon connector with 40 pins arranged 2 x 20, but one pin missing. It has a power connector with four larger pins in a row. A SATA drive has a much smaller connectors on it. One has 7 connection points for the data cable, and the other is twice as wide (but still less than 2") with 15 points for power, all in one row.
2. You WILL need an enclosure that has its own power supply. In fact, however, it is VERY difficult to find one for 3½" "standard" internal HDD units that does not come with a power supply.

The nice part of buying an enclosure is that you now have an external drive you can use for transporting data, or as an off-line backup unit. In fact, you can even built one now and later upgrade it with a larger HDD. HOWEVER, here's the downside. IF your old HDD is IDE and you buy an enclosure for that, in future you will find it VERY difficult to find a new large HDD that is IDE interface. Those are being phased out very soon. So if that's your situation pre-buy the larger upgrade unit now while you can.

The first alternative, though, is simply to mount the old HDD inside the new computer, even just temporarily, so you can copy files from it to your new drive. This costs you nothing, probably. BUT there are things to watch for.
3. What interface does your old drive have? If it is IDE, does your new computer have an IDE port on it? Or, is it entirely SATA? (Of course, if the old HDD is SATA, this is not an issue.) But an IDE HDD and a mobo with an IDE port is easy to get working. You need an IDE data ribbon cable - already in your old computer if this is an IDE drive.
4. If your old drive is SATA, there are NO jumpers to be set! Just connect it to one of your new SATA ports. I would assume the main new HDD is on the first SATA port (named SATA_0 or SATA_1), and the old HDD could plug into any other near there. Power is needed, too, of course.
5. IF your old HDD is IDE, you MUST set jumpers correctly, and here's how. On any single IDE port and cable you may connect up to two devices; hence, they must be differentiated into Master and Slave. These settings pertain only to the one IDE port / cable, and NOT to the computer as a whole. Master and Slave are set by placing jumpers on pins located on the back edge of the IDE drive, between the power and data connectors. The HDD case should have a diagram for this. On a few HDD's there is a distinction between Master with No Slave, and Master with Slave Present. For one IDE port / cable to be used, there MUST be a Master device, and it should be plugged into the END of the data ribbon. Most such cables have color-coded connectors today. The blue connector goes to the mobo port, the black connector on the other end goes to the Master device. IF there is a second device on the cable, it MUST be set to Slave and should be connected to the gray middle connector.
6. IF your new computer has NO IDE port and your old HDD is IDE, you have three choices. One most certainly is the external enclosure route, and that may be the best. Another is to buy and install an IDE controller card that goes into a PCI slot, but that hardly seems worth it just to allow copying files. the third is the cheapest, but sometimes troublesome. That is to buy a simple IDE drive to SATA port adapter which allows you to plug the IDE drive into a SATA port. (Do not confuse this with an adapter for SATA drive to IDE port.) These are cheaper than the other two options and hence worth considering for a temporary connection, but some users have reported problems getting them to work.
!