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Awesome cooling idea-will it work?

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  • Heatsinks
  • Cooling
  • Overclocking
Last response: in Overclocking
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July 17, 2010 10:00:57 PM

hi,
this really weird idea just struck me out of the blue.

imagine if had a water source (a tap but i like the sound of "water source" :D  ) near my pc, instead of wasting electricity using the pump and money to buy special coolants, how about if i just buy all the water blocks, and use the tank pressure to keep water flowing and collect the heated water in a bucket and use it for other purposes?

like if i really really slow down the water flow rate (which should be enough since the waters getting replaced and not recycled), the results going to be a mere 1 or 2 buckets a day and we can even adjust the water flow using the tap when in load and when idle...

i have a really good feeling it would give much better results than recycling the same old hot liquid and cheap too.

whatcha think??

More about : awesome cooling idea work

a b K Overclocking
July 17, 2010 11:10:24 PM

It should work, but that's quite a bit of water you'd be running through the system every day. I think you'd be surprised how much water it'd take. I'm not sure it'd be worth it to use a bunch of water rather than a bunch of electricity. But again, it would work in theory.
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a b K Overclocking
July 17, 2010 11:25:49 PM

It will definitely work. And the logistics problem will be too much to deal with. Therefore, not practical.
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a b K Overclocking
July 17, 2010 11:41:23 PM

Ubrales said:
the logistics problem will be too much to deal with.

That would be emptying the bucket ? :pt1cable: 
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July 17, 2010 11:46:55 PM

i think a very thin stream of water would be more than sufficient... like i mean how much water comes out when u ignorantly not close a tap tightly :kaola:  ... compare it to the volume of the water block and ull be replacing the whole amount every 5-10 seconds
n when gaming ill open it up a little more...
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a b K Overclocking
July 17, 2010 11:51:04 PM

Waterblocks are somewhat restrictive, you need some pressure to push the water through them, a trickle isn't going to do it.
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July 17, 2010 11:55:58 PM

delluser1 said:
Waterblocks are somewhat restrictive, you need some pressure to push the water through them, a trickle isn't going to do it.


that would mean it does the job of restricting water flow... it shouldn't matter if the flow is controlled by tap or water block. all i care about is that the output is less. i currently don't own a water cooled system but when (if) i get one ill definitely try this out first :D 
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July 18, 2010 3:07:27 AM

sounds like a lot of trouble for small reward.
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Best solution

July 18, 2010 4:26:01 AM

Just don't use the water to make your spaghetti dinner. Metal and plastics that aren't certified to hit drinking water (especially hot water) will leach some crazy chemicals that are above exposure limits.

If you are going to use it to flush your toilet or water plants then you are good to go. Any ideas for greener technology use is fun to tinker around with. Actually, I would think you could even build a gravity powered system where you have a tank with some sort of spigot that you could open up and let the water flow through so you don't have to be next to a tap.
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July 18, 2010 5:49:42 AM

Is there a way you could pipe the used water back into the system maybe to the drain, or toilet bowl, or get chemically approved parts.

I saw a setup where a guy had a couple computers (I think servers) hooked up with a pipe that went to his pool so he got a slightly heated or preheated pool.
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July 18, 2010 7:13:03 AM

ohh... i didn't know other people had this idea :ouch: 
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a b K Overclocking
July 18, 2010 12:05:03 PM

delluser1 said:
That would be emptying the bucket ? :pt1cable: 


Not just emptying the bucket. He has to deal with overflows and secondary containment issues.
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a c 331 K Overclocking
July 19, 2010 6:05:16 PM

This has been tried many times before. However effective it is while you actually have the water moving through the loop, once you close it off (or otherwise don't have any running water pushing through your house pipes) you start to run into issues. If you constantly let it run, you'd be ok, but again...feel free to calculate up your cost of implementation AND water bill vs. just building a closed loop...or 2.
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July 29, 2010 4:15:27 PM

rubix_1011 said:
This has been tried many times before. However effective it is while you actually have the water moving through the loop, once you close it off (or otherwise don't have any running water pushing through your house pipes) you start to run into issues. If you constantly let it run, you'd be ok, but again...feel free to calculate up your cost of implementation AND water bill vs. just building a closed loop...or 2.



oh... water bill... thats y u guys are talking about the cost... i live in india... i don't pay for water :kaola: 
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a c 331 K Overclocking
July 29, 2010 5:36:24 PM

You'd also have to consider the periods of time when the water loop was 'closed', meaning when water wasn't being circulated within your building or having an outlet. Having a cold water line is only effective if you continuously are getting cold water flowing through it or having a way for it to effectively circulate. On top of that, i'd be concerned about the amount of pressure in the pipes vs. the pressure building up in your system and finding tubing connections to spurt through...
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August 5, 2010 12:11:32 PM

Best answer selected by cyber_tron.
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