Skulltrailed Westmeres?

I've heard the first dual-socket 1366 mobo's will be arriving later this year. Now I'm wondering whether or not they will be compatible with the 6-core Westmere's planned for the last Q of this year.
If they're not, which rig would perform best? A Skulltrailed Nehalem or 1 6-cored Westmere?
(Taking in mind you'd get carte blanche, and you're using the high end CPU's of each type.)
Pls excuse me my noobness and TY in advance =)
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  1. Actually, they are already available. Of course, you can only use the Xeon Nehalems due to the need for multiple QPI links, and they don't support overclocking, but dual 1366 motherboards are currently available for workstations. They may support Westmere as well - I wouldn't be surprised at all if they did. The basic interconnects should be the same, so I don't see any obvious reason why they would not be backwards compatible.
  2. So It should be possible to run a 12-cored rig? I take it has some gaming bottleneck somewhere, right? Ty ^^
  3. It wouldn't be a gaming system, honestly. All dual 1366 motherboards are more oriented towards workstation use, and games aren't highly threaded enough to take advantage of the extra cores.
  4. So it would be a waste of money... Or at least for what I intend to do with it..
    Would there be a bottleneck or dissadvantage which real gaming rigs don't have? RAM etc? (like with the qx9775)
  5. Hard to say. You are limited to slower RAM on the multi socket boards (1333 IIRC), but that isn't really a bottleneck with i7 anyways. Really, there's just no logical reason to go with a multi socket i7 for gaming though, as i7 is already a beast when it comes to multithreaded applications, and games don't use all of that potential. You'd be better off spending the extra money that would have gone into the second CPU and expensive board on video cards instead.
  6. Would there be a counterside to buying a Dunnington x7470 chip? (appart from the whooping 2700$?)
    Can the 6x2.66Ghz version keep up with the 4x3.33 Ghz Nehalem chip coming out somewhere this year? (like running programs utilising only 4 cores for example)

    It's not like u really HAVE to have 2 CPU's right? Won't it work with just 1? (qx9775 experience)
  7. The Dunnington is meant for quad socket systems IIRC. Honestly, just get an i7 920 and overclock it. One CPU is more than enough for modern gaming and standard home applications. Why are you so set on wanting a high end multi socket system?

    Oh, and in every way that counts an i7 at 3+GHz FLATTENS a 2.66GHz Dunnington.
  8. cjl said:
    Oh, and in every way that counts an i7 at 3+GHz FLATTENS a 2.66GHz Dunnington.


    O.o Explain pl0x?
    Actually I want to have the best gaming CPU of the year, regardless of the costs/overkill factor (maybe that way I won't have to buy a new one for a while... And for the moment being I can fianlly afford it)

    Imagine it's q4 this year, and I'd give u 8k $, what cpu would u buy then?
  9. that graphene cpu that MIT made which runs at like 1THz
  10. Belochka said:
    O.o Explain pl0x?
    Actually I want to have the best gaming CPU of the year, regardless of the costs/overkill factor (maybe that way I won't have to buy a new one for a while... And for the moment being I can fianlly afford it)

    Imagine it's q4 this year, and I'd give u 8k $, what cpu would u buy then?


    Hard to say, as it isn't Q4 yet. However, if you gave me $8k right now, I'd use a single i7 965. Although there are bragging rights associated with something like a dual i7, it would have zero real benefit in games.

    As for the i7 flattening the Dunnington, it is because the i7 will obviously beat it at single threaded computation (just due to the higher clock speed), and it will beat it in multithreaded computation due to the massive multithreaded improvements that i7 brings to the table combined with the higher clock speed.
  11. the boards are very expensive

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813182186

    and i can't find whether or not they support crossfire, though, i know the AMD with NVIDIA Pro 3600 chipset support SLI
  12. @mindless, thats a server 1366 motherboard and they do not support sli or crossfire.

    the one's they are talking about are the one's like asus announced at the beginning of the year where you could use two i7 cpu's on one motherboard and still have SLI and CF.

    I'd still prefer a graphene Phenom II with 12mb of cache and running at 1thz.
  13. @ Helloworld_98: They're only clocked @ 3 GhZ tops and 4GhZ on OC aren't they? And they aren't real quad cores are they?

    @ Cjl: If Intel were to launch a higher clocked Dunnington later next year, or if u were to OC a 2.66GhZ one, wouldn't it outperform the Nehalem 965?
    If not I'll probably go with a Nehalem chip like you advised, ty ^^
  14. A Dunnington would have to be clocked similarly to a Nehalem to match its overall performance, and even then it would lose in some apps. Besides, Intel will definitely not be launching a higher clocked Dunnington - they are pushing Nehalem Xeons as hard as they can, and any new Xeon launches will be nehalem based (which is an excellent thing, as the Nehalem Xeons are setting records all over the place for performance).

    Also, Dunnington only works in server motherboards, so I don't know why you would want it for a gaming system.

    Oh, and with regards to Phenom II - the 1THz Phenom II is an imaginary CPU that would be awesome if it existed. The real ones are genuine quad cores (just like every other quad out there), and clock fairly reliably to the 3.6GHz range. They are excellent CPUs, and quite competitive with the Core 2 Quad line, but aren't as fast for truly processor limited tasks as the i7 (and they lag behind the i7 by a significant margin for these tasks).
  15. Hmm ok, Thx ^^
    I've googled for a whole day regarding the performance of the Dunnington chips vs the Nehalem cores and didn't find any usable information at all...
    I'll probably go with the 3.33GhZ chip later this year then ^^
    I really don't understand how you can know so much about this stuff, kinda envy you =)
    Now I've got a mall last question, whilest checking some of the server mobo's I came across a few with a huge expansion slot about twice the length of a normal PCI-slot. What is it for?

    Thx for all the help so far =)
  16. It's probably a PCI-X slot - extended PCI. They are used for some RAID cards and the like - and they are also compatible with older PCI devices (sort of the way a PCI-E x4 works in an x16 slot). It came about as an extension of the PCI standard for higher bandwidth.
  17. Oh ok, guess that's all this noob needs to know for now ^^
    thanks =)
  18. Can't seem to open up a new thread -.- same with the "add a reply" button
    sigh
    I guess you dont know how to mount a 775 socket TRUE Copper on a 1366 mobo? =D
  19. Can't seem to open up a new thread -.- same with the "add a reply" button
    sigh
    I guess you dont know how to mount a 775 socket TRUE Copper on a 1366 mobo? =D
  20. there are mounts which allow you to use a 775 socket heatsink on a 1366 mobo.

    also MIT's graphene CPU had 8 core's iirc and they concluded that in theory they could get to 1thz, maybe higher if you had some LN2 :)
  21. Belochka said:
    Can't seem to open up a new thread -.- same with the "add a reply" button
    sigh
    I guess you dont know how to mount a 775 socket TRUE Copper on a 1366 mobo? =D



    Buy a TRUE 1366 mount kit. The copper is quite heavy though - I'd be somewhat concerned about hanging 5 pounds of heatsink off the side of my board for too long.
  22. yeah 2kg is a lot to be hanging off a motherboard, it would be even worse if you were using a Raven case though.
  23. crap, triple post... -.- soz...
    And that's why I've put my case on it's side ^^
    Thx Ppl
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