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Need Help in Connecting a SATA 2 HDD

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July 28, 2010 1:59:54 AM

MY Conf: Intel E8400 ; 4gb ram ;SG 500gb HDD;LG optical drive ;

GA EP35 DS3R [4 yellow-SATA & 2 purple ports-GSATA &

1green port-IDE];

presently no OS in HDD :( 

Now i need to connect a new SG 500 gb [SATA2] with OS [vista] in this new HDD.

wen i tried to install Vista to new HDD , it was not detected ...then came to know about
ACHI and RAID stuff...


I'm totally confused as which one is better

I need 2 use both HDD's simultaneously with OS only in new HDD,and an optical drive[IDE] no floppy disk

Then how turn on ACHI/RAID and install its drivers so to use both HDDs...

More about : connecting sata hdd

a b G Storage
July 28, 2010 6:24:12 AM

Connect to first yellow connector, don't touch the raid settings. Set the bios to have the optical drive as the first boot device followed by the sata drive, save the settings and restart and install Vista.
If you have trouble with ACHI switch it IDE/PATA compatability mode.
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Best solution

a c 342 G Storage
July 28, 2010 4:14:02 PM

Let me re-phrase to be sure I understand your system. You have one IDE optical drive, no floppy drive, and two 500 GB SATA drives. One of the 500 GB units already is in your machine, but has no OS installed. You want to add the second SATA 500 GB unit and install the OS (Vista) on it.

What I'm not sure about is whether you plan to use the two 500 GB HDD's in some RAID array, or use both as separate drives with NO RAID in use. I am going to assume the latter - NO RAID, and use both drives separately. If that is wrong, ignore the rest of this and post the correct configuration you want so we can advise properly.

1. DISconnect the older existing HDD in your machine, so that only the one (newer) HDD is connected a the time that the OS is installed from its CD. Mount the newer
HDD in the machine, and connect its data and power cables. I suggest you connect the data cable to the port labeled "SATAII0" - the other HDD will connect to "SATAII1" later.
2. Check the jumper / cable on the optical drive. Since that is the ONLY device on the IDE port, it MUST be the Master. Ideally, set its jumper so that it is a Master, and connect it to the black END connector on the wide data ribbon cable. (Alternative: set its jumpers to "CS" and ensure it is on the cable end.)
3. Place your Vista Install CD in the optical drive. Turn on the machine and go immediately into BIOS Setup (see Manual p. 36) by holding down the "DEL" key until the Setup opening screen appears. From the Main Menu (Manual p. 37) choose Integrated Peripherals to set two things (p. 43). Set "SATA/RAID AHCI Mode" to AHCI, and then set "SATA AHCI Mode" to AHCI. The "natural way" to handle SATA drives is as AHCI devices, and Vista has AHCI drivers built in so it can handle them OK from the start. You should NOT need to go to IDE Emulation mode with Vista.
4. Esc back to Main Menu and choose Standard CMOS Features (p. 39). Set your date and time here, and check that the optical drive and your SATA HDD are showing on the lines below, even if they do say "IDE Channel x Master". Just note which channel your HDD is on.
5. Esc to Main Menu and choose Advanced BIOS Features (p. 41). Under Hard Disk Priority ensure that the only HDD you have is at the top of the list. Esc from there and go down to First Boot Device, and make that your optical drive. Esc from that and go down to Second Boot Device and make that the HDD.
6. Esc back to Main Menu. Use "F10" key to Save and Exit from here. This will save your settings above and complete the boot sequence. It should boot from the Install CD mounted in the optical drive, and that should find the only HDD available and offer it for the Install process. If you see the prompt for "Press F4 to install other drivers", you do NOT need to do that. With this configuration and SATA port settings you do not need to install from floppy disk (you don't have one) any drivers for RAID or other odd devices. Check that the size of the HDD it offers for the Install is correct - about 465 GB. I expect you will want it to use ALL of this HDD as the C: drive. Just go ahead and install normally.
7. When Vista is installed completely and running, follow the Manual Chapter 3 to install from the mobo's CD all the on-board device drivers and the Gigabyte utilities.
8. This is a good time to update every device driver in the system to the most recent ones available from the websites of the manufacturers. Especially do this for the mobo drivers from Gigabyte, and get any VISTA updates from Microsoft.
9. When all that is done, shut down, disconnect power, and go into the case to reconnect the older HDD. I suggest its data cable go to the "SATAII1" port. Close up, connect power, boot and go directly into BIOS Setup. Check the Standard CMOS Features (p. 39) to see where that second drive is showing. Esc and check the Advanced BIOS Features screen (p. 41), and its Hard Disk Boot Priority setting. That should still show the one disk you have installed the OS on as the first one in the list. It may show your second disk after that. Use F10 to Save and Exit and it will boot up.
10. When you are in Windows Vista now, you may NOT see that second HDD in My Computer. It all depends on its past history. If it has Partitions already established and formatted, it will show up there. But if it is an empty disk (like brand new) it will not, and you will need to use Windows' built-in tool Disk Management to Partition and Format it.
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July 29, 2010 1:48:13 AM

Paperdoc said:
Let me re-phrase to be sure I understand your system. You have one IDE optical drive, no floppy drive, and two 500 GB SATA drives. One of the 500 GB units already is in your machine, but has no OS installed. You want to add the second SATA 500 GB unit and install the OS (Vista) on it.

What I'm not sure about is whether you plan to use the two 500 GB HDD's in some RAID array, or use both as separate drives with NO RAID in use. I am going to assume the latter - NO RAID, and use both drives separately. If that is wrong, ignore the rest of this and post the correct configuration you want so we can advise properly.

1. DISconnect the older existing HDD in your machine, so that only the one (newer) HDD is connected a the time that the OS is installed from its CD. Mount the newer
HDD in the machine, and connect its data and power cables. I suggest you connect the data cable to the port labeled "SATAII0" - the other HDD will connect to "SATAII1" later.
2. Check the jumper / cable on the optical drive. Since that is the ONLY device on the IDE port, it MUST be the Master. Ideally, set its jumper so that it is a Master, and connect it to the black END connector on the wide data ribbon cable. (Alternative: set its jumpers to "CS" and ensure it is on the cable end.)
3. Place your Vista Install CD in the optical drive. Turn on the machine and go immediately into BIOS Setup (see Manual p. 36) by holding down the "DEL" key until the Setup opening screen appears. From the Main Menu (Manual p. 37) choose Integrated Peripherals to set two things (p. 43). Set "SATA/RAID AHCI Mode" to AHCI, and then set "SATA AHCI Mode" to AHCI. The "natural way" to handle SATA drives is as AHCI devices, and Vista has AHCI drivers built in so it can handle them OK from the start. You should NOT need to go to IDE Emulation mode with Vista.
4. Esc back to Main Menu and choose Standard CMOS Features (p. 39). Set your date and time here, and check that the optical drive and your SATA HDD are showing on the lines below, even if they do say "IDE Channel x Master". Just note which channel your HDD is on.
5. Esc to Main Menu and choose Advanced BIOS Features (p. 41). Under Hard Disk Priority ensure that the only HDD you have is at the top of the list. Esc from there and go down to First Boot Device, and make that your optical drive. Esc from that and go down to Second Boot Device and make that the HDD.
6. Esc back to Main Menu. Use "F10" key to Save and Exit from here. This will save your settings above and complete the boot sequence. It should boot from the Install CD mounted in the optical drive, and that should find the only HDD available and offer it for the Install process. If you see the prompt for "Press F4 to install other drivers", you do NOT need to do that. With this configuration and SATA port settings you do not need to install from floppy disk (you don't have one) any drivers for RAID or other odd devices. Check that the size of the HDD it offers for the Install is correct - about 465 GB. I expect you will want it to use ALL of this HDD as the C: drive. Just go ahead and install normally.
7. When Vista is installed completely and running, follow the Manual Chapter 3 to install from the mobo's CD all the on-board device drivers and the Gigabyte utilities.
8. This is a good time to update every device driver in the system to the most recent ones available from the websites of the manufacturers. Especially do this for the mobo drivers from Gigabyte, and get any VISTA updates from Microsoft.
9. When all that is done, shut down, disconnect power, and go into the case to reconnect the older HDD. I suggest its data cable go to the "SATAII1" port. Close up, connect power, boot and go directly into BIOS Setup. Check the Standard CMOS Features (p. 39) to see where that second drive is showing. Esc and check the Advanced BIOS Features screen (p. 41), and its Hard Disk Boot Priority setting. That should still show the one disk you have installed the OS on as the first one in the list. It may show your second disk after that. Use F10 to Save and Exit and it will boot up.
10. When you are in Windows Vista now, you may NOT see that second HDD in My Computer. It all depends on its past history. If it has Partitions already established and formatted, it will show up there. But if it is an empty disk (like brand new) it will not, and you will need to use Windows' built-in tool Disk Management to Partition and Format it.



thanks a lot for ur help :) 

yes i just need to stay connected with my 2 drives at same time and

my old HDD has partions and data in it which i need..

Will i be able 2 remove and insert my old HDD wenever i need under ACHI, so that i can use it a portable one sometimes...

but i'm not understanding with wat is RAID and ACHI ...

is RAID used to merge data in both HDDs ??

And Shud i do somethin like this for ACHI ...

1. use neolite and slipstream my preinstall intel drivers

OR

2. these drivers r already in Vista

i've [2*2]GB DDR2 RAM ...

i read here[http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/107504-integration-of-i...]

that its better to use 64bit OS or with 32bit remove 1 ramstick and insert it later after installation ... is this true??

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July 29, 2010 1:52:12 AM

Jonmor68 said:
Connect to first yellow connector, don't touch the raid settings. Set the bios to have the optical drive as the first boot device followed by the sata drive, save the settings and restart and install Vista.
If you have trouble with ACHI switch it IDE/PATA compatability mode.




thanks a lot...

in IDE/PATA compatability mode can i use both of my HDDs simultaneously??

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a c 415 G Storage
July 29, 2010 3:53:32 AM

Paperdoc's done an excellent job of explaining things.

If you're installing Vista or Windows 7 then you should use the AHCI mode. The system will work and will be able to access both HDDs in either mode, but AHCI is a newer protocol that includes additional features and can result in slightly better performance. With the newer operating systems there's just no reason to use IDE mode.

As Paperdoc mentioned - don't panic if, after installation, you re-connect the 2nd drive but it doesn't show up in Explorer. If it's a new drive you just need to use Disk Management to partition and format it (Start -> Right-click "Computer", select "Manage" -> click "Disk Management" in the left pane). Once that's done the drive will appear in Explorer and you'll be able to use it.

Paperdoc's suggestion of having only the OS drive connected when you install Windows is an excellent one. If you don't do this then Windows will create a "System Recovery" partition on the other drive, and it will actually boot from the other drive before starting Windows. This means your system will be rendered unbootable if EITHER drive fails.

The reason they do this is that if the OS drive gets corrupted you can still boot from the recovery partition in order to run repair software - but in my experience it just tends to cause confusion and problems because people assume that the OS drive is all that should be needed to boot from.
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a c 342 G Storage
July 29, 2010 4:21:24 PM

If you do as I suggested, it should all work. Since your old HDD is already Partitioned and Formatted with files on it, IGNORE my note about having to use Disk Management to do those tasks. It should be recognized as soon as you install it (step #9 in my post) and be visible in My Computer.

If you choose to remove the older HDD and then re-install it from time to time there should be no problem. That's an unusual way to do things, but it still ought to work.

To use AHCI you do NOT need to make any special changes or slipstream anything. VISTA has the AHCI device drivers built in already. You do NOT need to install drivers from a floppy disk or anything else.

AHCI is just a protocol (set of rules for communication with the device) for the OS to use the HDD unit. It has better features than the older PATA system, so it is preferred for new SATA drives capable of working under that system.

RAID is actually a whole group of very different ways of organizing data on multiple (2 or more) HDD units for various purposes. One of its dilemmas, though, is that there are MANY slightly different versions of how it is done. They differ at the level of how the hardware controllers use the HDD's, and that also requires some cooperation with the OS. So, the OS MUST have a driver for the RAID system installed in it (like any other driver for a "device") that is specifically written for the particular RAID system you are using. NO version of Windows has RAID drivers built in - to use RAID in any form you DO have to install the correct RAID driver. And that means if you want to be able to BOOT from a RAID array, you need to follow particular installation procedures at the time of first installing the OS so that the required drivers are added into the right place in the OS being installed. Otherwise how could it access the HDD to boot from?

First piece of advice: do NOT leap into RAID of any kind until you read up on it and understand it well enough. You MAY (probably will) need to understand enough to fix it from time to time because the systems are more complex, require more attention to set up and maintain, and sometimes are more prone to failure, than any simple HDD system.

VERY briefly, here are the main types of RAID systems.

RAID0 uses two matched HDD units (sometimes more) and alternately splits pieces of every file between the two drives. This can give a speed advantage because one drive can be writing or reading data while the other drive is still searching for the next piece. But sometimes the speed advantage is small over today's fast HDD units. The disadvantage / risk is that BOTH drives must work flawlessly, because every file is broken up and a failure of one HDD unit in the array means ALL of the data is lost. RAID0 array users REALLY need to do proper data backups well! In a RAID0 array, the total array capacity is the sum of the HDD units' capacity.

RAID1 uses two matched HDD units also, but uses the second one to be an exact mirror copy of the first one. So if one HDD fails or has bad data, there is an instantly-available copy on the other drive to use. A complete restoration of the array, including a complete replacement of the failed HDD unit, can be done at a later time and even in the background as normal work progresses. This system works well in places where no downtime it tolerable. However, some people mistakenly use this system as an "automatic backup" which it is not. The combined capacity of a RAID1 array is that of ONE of its disks only, so it costs twice as much per GB as a single independent HDD.

RAID5 is a system that uses at least 3 HDD units (the classic form is 5) that should be matched. It takes every chunk of data written to the array, breaks it up, and does some mathematical processing to get a new additional piece of info, then writes all of these to separate HDD units in the array. The extra data calculated is such that, if any one of the pieces of data is corrupted (by a disk error or failure), the remaining pieces can be used to regenerate the original data with NO errors. It is thus called a "fault-tolerant" system because it can survive HDD errors without losing any data. In fact, if one HDD unit in the array fails, it can be replaced and the entire data set completely regenerated from the remaining good drives. This takes a lot of time and processing power, but it does work. To do this, however, takes more processing at all stages, so RAID5 systems typically have slower performance than individual HDD's. Moreover, if TWO HDD's in the array fail simultaneously (I have seen this once) the automatic data restoration cannot be done and all is lost. One more reason for doing backups properly. In a RAID5 system, the total data capacity of the array is only 80% or less of the total capacity of all its component HDD units.
RAID6 is much less common, but it is a step better than RAID5. Is is a further extension of the RAID5 concept in which additional data are calculated and stored (this takes more time and HDD space) from the original data. The result is that this system CAN recover from simultaneous failure of TWO HDD units in the array. Typically it uses 6 HDD units in one array, and makes available only 65% or so of the combined capacity of all its component units.

Regarding OS type and RAM:
Any 32-bit OS can only address memory up to 4 GB. You cannot possibly use more RAM than that with a 32-bit OS (unless you do some very special things most users cannot do). Moreover, some of that memory space - the part used for video (even if it is RAM on your video card) plus the part of real on-board RAM reserved for use by the OS itself - will not be available for applications to use. So a system with 4 GB of RAM and a 32-bit OS will actually have for general use something like 2.8 to 3.4 GB, depending on the size of your video card's memory.

On the other hand, a 64-bit OS can address vastly more memory space than you could possibly mount in a machine today. That means you CAN install more than 4 GB of RAM (if your mobo and wallet will let you) and it will ALL be available except for about 0.3 to 0.5 GB reserved for the OS itself. The memory space on your video card will NOT affect the RAM space you can use.

As for the advice to remove some RAM while first installing your 32-bit OS and then re-install it later, I can't explain why that is necessary in a few cases. But I guess it can't hurt and might help you avoid some odd problem. IF you do this, I suggest you do it this way:
If your 4 GB of RAM is in two sticks, just remove one of them. Consult your mobo manual and make sure the single installed stick is in the correct slot.
If your RAM is 4 x 1GB sticks, remove two of them. BUT again consult your mobo manual and make sure the two installed sticks are in the correct slots to enable what is called dual-channel memory mode.
After you have installed the OS, shut down and re-install the RAM you removed. when you start up again it will recognize the change and just work. Then you can proceed with updates, application software installation, etc.
m
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l
July 29, 2010 9:05:50 PM

Paperdoc said:
If you do as I suggested, it should all work. Since your old HDD is already Partitioned and Formatted with files on it, IGNORE my note about having to use Disk Management to do those tasks. It should be recognized as soon as you install it (step #9 in my post) and be visible in My Computer.

If you choose to remove the older HDD and then re-install it from time to time there should be no problem. That's an unusual way to do things, but it still ought to work.

To use AHCI you do NOT need to make any special changes or slipstream anything. VISTA has the AHCI device drivers built in already. You do NOT need to install drivers from a floppy disk or anything else.

AHCI is just a protocol (set of rules for communication with the device) for the OS to use the HDD unit. It has better features than the older PATA system, so it is preferred for new SATA drives capable of working under that system.

RAID is actually a whole group of very different ways of organizing data on multiple (2 or more) HDD units for various purposes. One of its dilemmas, though, is that there are MANY slightly different versions of how it is done. They differ at the level of how the hardware controllers use the HDD's, and that also requires some cooperation with the OS. So, the OS MUST have a driver for the RAID system installed in it (like any other driver for a "device") that is specifically written for the particular RAID system you are using. NO version of Windows has RAID drivers built in - to use RAID in any form you DO have to install the correct RAID driver. And that means if you want to be able to BOOT from a RAID array, you need to follow particular installation procedures at the time of first installing the OS so that the required drivers are added into the right place in the OS being installed. Otherwise how could it access the HDD to boot from?

First piece of advice: do NOT leap into RAID of any kind until you read up on it and understand it well enough. You MAY (probably will) need to understand enough to fix it from time to time because the systems are more complex, require more attention to set up and maintain, and sometimes are more prone to failure, than any simple HDD system.

VERY briefly, here are the main types of RAID systems.

RAID0 uses two matched HDD units (sometimes more) and alternately splits pieces of every file between the two drives. This can give a speed advantage because one drive can be writing or reading data while the other drive is still searching for the next piece. But sometimes the speed advantage is small over today's fast HDD units. The disadvantage / risk is that BOTH drives must work flawlessly, because every file is broken up and a failure of one HDD unit in the array means ALL of the data is lost. RAID0 array users REALLY need to do proper data backups well! In a RAID0 array, the total array capacity is the sum of the HDD units' capacity.

RAID1 uses two matched HDD units also, but uses the second one to be an exact mirror copy of the first one. So if one HDD fails or has bad data, there is an instantly-available copy on the other drive to use. A complete restoration of the array, including a complete replacement of the failed HDD unit, can be done at a later time and even in the background as normal work progresses. This system works well in places where no downtime it tolerable. However, some people mistakenly use this system as an "automatic backup" which it is not. The combined capacity of a RAID1 array is that of ONE of its disks only, so it costs twice as much per GB as a single independent HDD.

RAID5 is a system that uses at least 3 HDD units (the classic form is 5) that should be matched. It takes every chunk of data written to the array, breaks it up, and does some mathematical processing to get a new additional piece of info, then writes all of these to separate HDD units in the array. The extra data calculated is such that, if any one of the pieces of data is corrupted (by a disk error or failure), the remaining pieces can be used to regenerate the original data with NO errors. It is thus called a "fault-tolerant" system because it can survive HDD errors without losing any data. In fact, if one HDD unit in the array fails, it can be replaced and the entire data set completely regenerated from the remaining good drives. This takes a lot of time and processing power, but it does work. To do this, however, takes more processing at all stages, so RAID5 systems typically have slower performance than individual HDD's. Moreover, if TWO HDD's in the array fail simultaneously (I have seen this once) the automatic data restoration cannot be done and all is lost. One more reason for doing backups properly. In a RAID5 system, the total data capacity of the array is only 80% or less of the total capacity of all its component HDD units.
RAID6 is much less common, but it is a step better than RAID5. Is is a further extension of the RAID5 concept in which additional data are calculated and stored (this takes more time and HDD space) from the original data. The result is that this system CAN recover from simultaneous failure of TWO HDD units in the array. Typically it uses 6 HDD units in one array, and makes available only 65% or so of the combined capacity of all its component units.

Regarding OS type and RAM:
Any 32-bit OS can only address memory up to 4 GB. You cannot possibly use more RAM than that with a 32-bit OS (unless you do some very special things most users cannot do). Moreover, some of that memory space - the part used for video (even if it is RAM on your video card) plus the part of real on-board RAM reserved for use by the OS itself - will not be available for applications to use. So a system with 4 GB of RAM and a 32-bit OS will actually have for general use something like 2.8 to 3.4 GB, depending on the size of your video card's memory.

On the other hand, a 64-bit OS can address vastly more memory space than you could possibly mount in a machine today. That means you CAN install more than 4 GB of RAM (if your mobo and wallet will let you) and it will ALL be available except for about 0.3 to 0.5 GB reserved for the OS itself. The memory space on your video card will NOT affect the RAM space you can use.

As for the advice to remove some RAM while first installing your 32-bit OS and then re-install it later, I can't explain why that is necessary in a few cases. But I guess it can't hurt and might help you avoid some odd problem. IF you do this, I suggest you do it this way:
If your 4 GB of RAM is in two sticks, just remove one of them. Consult your mobo manual and make sure the single installed stick is in the correct slot.
If your RAM is 4 x 1GB sticks, remove two of them. BUT again consult your mobo manual and make sure the two installed sticks are in the correct slots to enable what is called dual-channel memory mode.
After you have installed the OS, shut down and re-install the RAM you removed. when you start up again it will recognize the change and just work. Then you can proceed with updates, application software installation, etc.


thanks again

i'll stick with ACHI...

is there anything extra to be done enable NCQ and Hot Swapping.

after all this i can use my second HDD (SATA I) through eSATA port right???
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July 29, 2010 9:15:25 PM

sminlal said:
Paperdoc's done an excellent job of explaining things.

If you're installing Vista or Windows 7 then you should use the AHCI mode. The system will work and will be able to access both HDDs in either mode, but AHCI is a newer protocol that includes additional features and can result in slightly better performance. With the newer operating systems there's just no reason to use IDE mode.

As Paperdoc mentioned - don't panic if, after installation, you re-connect the 2nd drive but it doesn't show up in Explorer. If it's a new drive you just need to use Disk Management to partition and format it (Start -> Right-click "Computer", select "Manage" -> click "Disk Management" in the left pane). Once that's done the drive will appear in Explorer and you'll be able to use it.

Paperdoc's suggestion of having only the OS drive connected when you install Windows is an excellent one. If you don't do this then Windows will create a "System Recovery" partition on the other drive, and it will actually boot from the other drive before starting Windows. This means your system will be rendered unbootable if EITHER drive fails.

The reason they do this is that if the OS drive gets corrupted you can still boot from the recovery partition in order to run repair software - but in my experience it just tends to cause confusion and problems because people assume that the OS drive is all that should be needed to boot from.


thanx a lot.

SATA I and SATA II can be simultaneously connected under AHCI with no problems right??
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a c 415 G Storage
July 29, 2010 9:39:24 PM

deerajks said:
SATA I and SATA II can be simultaneously connected under AHCI with no problems right??
Shouldn't be any problems. (Doesn't mean there won't be, but it's supposed to work...)
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a c 342 G Storage
July 30, 2010 3:10:35 PM

Echo that. Should be no problems at all. Each SATA port is managed individually by the controller chip. In fact, very often an eSATA port is actually provided by a different chip on the mobo from the main SATA ports.

Regarding NCQ and Hot Swapping, those both should be handled automatically by the AHCI driver. For Hot Swapping, that is not used among internal drives, anyway, but may be of interest for the eSATA idea. Sometimes, however, glitches in these feature implementations occur. If they do, check around here for relevant posts.

If you plan to connect the old HDD to the eSATA port, I presume that means you plan to buy an external enclosure and mount the old HDD inside to create an external or "portable" hard drive. That's often a good way to re-task a drive. I assume also that you have an eSATA port on your machine. A couple of points to note:

1. External enclosures often are available with more than one interface to the computer. For example, I bought one with both USB2 and eSATA; I use the eSATA, but I could take that unit anywhere and be confident of connecting to any PC via USB at least. These days if you can get the USB3 variety for faster (than USB2) performance and future-ready, plus eSATA, might be good idea.

2. If you have a real eSATA port on your PC already, you're golden. Many external drives and enclosures come with an adapter plate you mount in an unused PCI slot on the back, and a cable that connects to a mobo regular SATA port. This converts a SATA connector to an eSATA connector, but it does not necessarily give you a true eSATA port. It all depends on what extra features were built into your on-board SATA controllers. Some feature of eSATA - for example, Hot Swap ability and higher signal voltages to allow longer cable uses - are not part of the plain SATA specs, but MAY be included in your plain mobo SATA ports anyway. You just don't know. If you don't need those features it does not matter.
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July 31, 2010 1:39:48 AM

Paperdoc said:
Echo that. Should be no problems at all. Each SATA port is managed individually by the controller chip. In fact, very often an eSATA port is actually provided by a different chip on the mobo from the main SATA ports.

Regarding NCQ and Hot Swapping, those both should be handled automatically by the AHCI driver. For Hot Swapping, that is not used among internal drives, anyway, but may be of interest for the eSATA idea. Sometimes, however, glitches in these feature implementations occur. If they do, check around here for relevant posts.

If you plan to connect the old HDD to the eSATA port, I presume that means you plan to buy an external enclosure and mount the old HDD inside to create an external or "portable" hard drive. That's often a good way to re-task a drive. I assume also that you have an eSATA port on your machine. A couple of points to note:

1. External enclosures often are available with more than one interface to the computer. For example, I bought one with both USB2 and eSATA; I use the eSATA, but I could take that unit anywhere and be confident of connecting to any PC via USB at least. These days if you can get the USB3 variety for faster (than USB2) performance and future-ready, plus eSATA, might be good idea.

2. If you have a real eSATA port on your PC already, you're golden. Many external drives and enclosures come with an adapter plate you mount in an unused PCI slot on the back, and a cable that connects to a mobo regular SATA port. This converts a SATA connector to an eSATA connector, but it does not necessarily give you a true eSATA port. It all depends on what extra features were built into your on-board SATA controllers. Some feature of eSATA - for example, Hot Swap ability and higher signal voltages to allow longer cable uses - are not part of the plain SATA specs, but MAY be included in your plain mobo SATA ports anyway. You just don't know. If you don't need those features it does not matter.


thanks again... :) 

can i know glitches of what sort???

i've real sata port bracket ,which i need to connect to a yellow port right?
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August 5, 2010 7:01:38 PM

Best answer selected by deerajks.
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December 10, 2010 3:07:34 PM

Hi Paperdoc..

Saw your posts and help to the members here.. I also need your help

I had one 250 GB SATA Segate HDD running Win XP SP3 then my system crashed and could not install XP on the same HDD.
I had 2 partitions on it (C and E).
Now added another 80GB SATA HDD with Win XP3, running XP fine.
Thought to attach 250 GB HDD and take a backup of the data from previous HDD's E drive.

Now 250 GB HDD is showing in BIOS but not in My Computer or Manager - Storage.

Please help if something can be done.

Thanks,
Raj

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