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COMPLETE GUIDE: How to overclock AMD Phenom II X6 to 4.0Ghz

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July 22, 2010 8:46:41 PM

This is the COMPLETE guide how to achieve 4.0Ghz 100% of the time, stable
This guide was done with AMD Phenom II X6 1055T
I suppose that with a Phenom II X6 1090T you could reach 4.4Ghz stable, 100% of the time, that would be great!

I have tested this with Adobe Premiere CS5, Acronis True Image Home maximum compression (33GB file, great test to test the temperature), and Crysis, and normal gaming

This is how you do it:

First THEORY

You CANNOT reach 4.0Ghz unless you DOWNCLOCK the RAM, NorthBridge and HT Link Speed

You CANNOT reach 4.0Ghz unless you raise the voltage for BOTH the CPU and the CPU/NB

Anyway, here are the values. I have DRAM of 1333Mhz, so that is why I downclocked my RAM to 1140Mhz

Features you need to turn off:
Turbo
C1E
Cool N Quiet

Here are the values:

FSB: 285 Mhz
DRAM: 1140 Mhz
CPU/NB: 1425 Mhz
HT Link Speed: 1425 Mhz
CPU Voltage: 1.425 V
CPU/NB Voltage: 1.256 V



I will appreciate if someone can help me complete this guide with the max STABLE overclocking value that can be reached with C1E and Cool N Quiet enabled

I think 3.7Ghz is a stable speed with these features enabled. I might turn Turbo on too just to see if I can achieve that.

I wonder how much money will I save every month if I run C1E and Cool N Quiet. I am on my computer 8 hours a day.

However this guide was written for those wanting to reach a STABLE and 100% 4.0Ghz speed on all 6 cores, with a $199 processor: 1055T :) 
July 22, 2010 9:19:02 PM

Now, assuming the electricity here in California costs $0.16 cents per Kwh, I would spend 100 watts extra every hour my PC is on

That is, if I use 10 hours per day, 1 Kwh (kilowatt hour) extra every day

Now, if you multiply that by $0.16 cents, thats $5.1863 extra per month
Here is a graphic showing the price of electricity in USA



I am currently running my CPU at 3.6Mhz, but I think my experiment is pretty much dead now

for $5 a month I can avoid all these hassle and reach a stable 4.0Ghz instead of a stable 3.5Ghz-3.6Ghz.

I still haven't figured out what is the mas stable speed that I can reach with C1E and Cool N Quiet turned on

However, as you know, AMD processors use less power than Intel, so I might as well take advantage of that and just OC to 4.0Ghz 100% of the time
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July 23, 2010 1:51:30 AM

I was able to reach 3766 Mhz with C1E and Cool N' Quiet

I also enabled Turbo with the multiplier at 14.5 to reach a turbo speed of 3900

overall I'm happy with the processor, but I will be using it with 4.0Ghz, C1E, Cool N Quiet and Turbo disabled

I just did too many trial and error attempts to reach 4.0Ghz, and I am going to enjoy being part of the 4.0Ghz Club :) 
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July 23, 2010 2:40:10 AM

rafarataneneces said:
Now, assuming the electricity here in California costs $0.16 cents per Kwh, I would spend 100 watts extra every hour my PC is on

That is, if I use 10 hours per day, 1 Kwh (kilowatt hour) extra every day

Now, if you multiply that by $0.16 cents, thats $5.1863 extra per month
Here is a graphic showing the price of electricity in USA

http://img705.imageshack.us/img705/4098/electriccostmap.gif

I am currently running my CPU at 3.6Mhz, but I think my experiment is pretty much dead now

for $5 a month I can avoid all these hassle and reach a stable 4.0Ghz instead of a stable 3.5Ghz-3.6Ghz.

I still haven't figured out what is the mas stable speed that I can reach with C1E and Cool N Quiet turned on

However, as you know, AMD processors use less power than Intel, so I might as well take advantage of that and just OC to 4.0Ghz 100% of the time


forget about saving money by using CnQ, I have already tried this for a month back in January of this year @ 4Ghz. My electric bill was 80.53$ with CnQ enabled for the full month.. On February 1st I disabled CnQ and the bill was 84.27$. It also messes with my OC so I don't bother. I guess you would need a few PC's under one household running CnQ to actually see the savings.
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July 23, 2010 2:50:44 AM

Well I estimated a savings of $5, and you tell me it's around $4, so I was drop dead accurate :) 

Anyway, I am still testing my overclock, I just want to know what is the limit

the limit seems to be around 3766 Mhz, which is good

but again, I want to find that exact limit, just for testing purposes

then I will go back to my beautiful and stable 4.0Ghz :) 

Thanks so much for your post
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July 23, 2010 3:00:05 AM

rafarataneneces said:
Well I estimated a savings of $5, and you tell me it's around $4, so I was drop dead accurate :) 

Anyway, I am still testing my overclock, I just want to know what is the limit

the limit seems to be around 3766 Mhz, which is good

but again, I want to find that exact limit, just for testing purposes

then I will go back to my beautiful and stable 4.0Ghz :) 

Thanks so much for your post


all CPU's and mobo's are different so you need to find that answer on your own ;) 

my limit is 3.825Ghz summer/ 3.976Ghz winter
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July 23, 2010 12:39:28 PM

are u talking about the limit with C1E and Cool N' Quiet enabled or disabled?

Thanks for sharing that
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July 23, 2010 2:20:35 PM

that's with both enabled.

but since it is not prime stable I see no use for it, so I just disable all my power saving features. Cool n Quiet + C1E is not really meant for a PC where there is alot of OC'ing going on, it makes your system unstable most of the time, especially when you push those NB volts. I use those features in my secondary PC which is mainly for itunes/websurfing/etc..
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April 14, 2011 4:25:10 PM

Hello there,

I recently gave these instructions a go. I disabled turbo c1e and cool and quiet, followed all these instructions to the tee and I also have a coolermaster v6 cooler. However when I started crysis 2 and went to log in I got a bsod. Any reason this might be? Maybe my chip just cant handle as much? If I am going to overclock my pc which I am really interested in doing can someone just give me a simple explanation as to what settings to slowly change to see where this starts happening? Thanks for any advice anyone has.

Bryan
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April 14, 2011 5:59:59 PM

I just have to say this and maybe OvrClkr don't agree with me.

FAIL

1- With those settings you aren't getting any performance
2- Those settings only work for you and I'm pretty sure that if you change a basic component (CPU, RAM or both), those same settings will not work as well.
3- What temps? Not all people have the same temps that you have.
4- What stress test did you use it?

That's IMO
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April 14, 2011 6:11:26 PM

I think the title should be edited to "The Incomplete guide"

This isn't a guide at all just showing your values... and they're almost always different for every single PC set up.

bryanb: stress test it and modify voltages accordingly to gain stability.
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April 14, 2011 7:46:38 PM

A 1090t will not reach 4.4GHz 100% of the time. There's no guarantee that any CPU will hit 4.4GHz. If you hit 4.4GHz with a 1090t and have acceptable temps you are one of the lucky few in my opinion. And a 1055t will most definitely not hit 4.0GHz 100% of the time.

This isn't really a COMPLETE guide, hardly a guide at all. This is just you discussing your own overclock and what not. I bet if 10 people had the same system as you and applied the exact same settings specified in your first post, only 1 computer will be stable. Thats 10%, not a 100%.

Forgive me if you find that last statement a bit harsh...
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April 14, 2011 8:30:17 PM

Hey guys,

I appreciate the input. I am very new to this side of things, Ive always been an avid computer gamer, etc. but have never really delved into the side of overclocking, but after picking up my latest rig I have a strong interest in seeing what I can do.

I kind of figured this wasnt exactly the way to go about doing this. I am very quickly realizing that I will need to have patience and just slowly bump it up until I find where it is bugging out and then pulling back a bit into a stable condition.

As far as what I have gathered so far, it seems that I should bump up the cpu base clock (the 200mhz one) at like 5 mhz increments and then once I find where it becomes unstable, to bump up the voltage a notch and then keep going?

The only thing I wonder is I know that all of the major components work off of that base clock so do I want to be reducing any other values while doing this?

Thanks again for the responses and I will see what else I can find on this site to assist me in getting this done properly :) 

Cheers,

Bryan
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April 14, 2011 8:39:48 PM

@bryanb58: Please create your own thread asking for advice about your overclock.

And be sure that you list all your hardware specs in the thread for a full reply: Mobo, CPU, RAM, PSU, Cooler, and stock load temps that you get in without overclock.
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April 29, 2011 11:20:48 AM

This topic has been closed by 4ryan6
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