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2TB Hitachi HD only recognize 137GB! What to do?

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July 30, 2010 3:59:05 AM

I'm at a loss. There's no jumper in the back either. I went to the Hitachi website to no avail. Running XP with SP2 installed.
July 30, 2010 4:00:49 AM

My motherboard is Gigabyte MA78LM-S2H with a Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core processor.
July 30, 2010 4:02:03 AM

I checked the BIOS and confirms 2TB Hitachi Hard drive so I don't think it's the BIOS.
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August 2, 2010 3:55:17 AM

Does anyone have any advices for me?
a b G Storage
August 2, 2010 4:59:53 AM

At the time of instalation (when you created the partition) your version of XP was pre-SP1.

If you search the forum, you'll find dozens of threads with advice on how to fix it.

Best solution

a c 329 G Storage
August 2, 2010 8:43:53 PM
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The answers depend a lot on information you did not give us. Is this the only HDD in your system? Did you install your OS on it? Or, is your OS already on another HDD and is this a new drive you are adding to an existing system?

First, let's assume as MrLinux did that this is your only HDD and you installed Win XP on it as the boot drive. (If that's not true - if you are adding a second HDD to a system - stop here and post a clarification for us to see.) If the OS you installed was original Win XP with NO service packs included in the Install Disk, it did NOT have support for 48-bit LBA and hence could not create or use any Partition over 137 GB (the way HDD makers count it) or 128 GB the way M$ counts it. Even if you update the installed XP to SP2 or SP3 after installation, that will NOT change the size of the Partition originally created. Jumpers have nothing to do with it. By the way, I strongly suggest you update to SP3, although that will NOT solve you problem here.

Once a Boot Partition is created, Win XP cannot expand it or change it in any way to add more disk space to it. So, how can you gain access to the rest of your 2 TB of space? You have five choices.

1. Leave what you have and adapt to the situation. Use Windows' built-in tool Disk Management to use the Unallocated Space on your HDD to Create one to three additional non-bootable Partitions on the drive and Format each of them. Each will be treated as a completely separate drive with its own letter name.

2. Buy and use a third-party software tool like Partition Magic that can (unlike Windows itself) expand your existing Partition by adding on the Unallocated Space so that your C: drive becomes as big as you want, up to the total HDD capacity.

From here on, the next three solution options mean you will wipe out what is on your HDD already and re-do the installation. So if you have been using your machine and it has important data in the HDD, make sure you copy it off to another safe place. Then AFTER the re-installation is done you can copy those back.

3. IF you are sure that the Win XP Install Disk you worked from DOES actually have SP1 or SP2 included in it, then just MAYBE the problem is that during the original Install process you did not notice that there was a choice to be made about the size of the Partition it was creating for the Installation. If that is the case, you can re-do the installation from the same disk, but be SURE to specify the Partition size as the entire HDD size. (By the way, Microsoft Windows will see a 2 TB HDD as about 1,825 GB, not 2,000.)

4. Assuming you only have an original Win XP Install Disk with NO Service Packs included, buy a different copy of Win XP that does have at least SP1 included in it and start over by re-installing from it. Ensure that the Partition it creates for the installation is the whole HDD space. Update to SP3 as soon as you can.

5. If you have a CD-R burner in your machine, you can make a new Win XP Install Disk by yourself for FREE with a process called Slipstreaming. Then you use it to re-do the Install, but this time with a fully up-to-date Win XP that WILL use the whole disk. To do this you will need to read up on the internet about Slipstreaming. Then you will have to download some software tools, some update files and a good step-by-step set of instructions. Basically, the steps in the process are these:
(a) Using a software tool, you copy your existing original Win XP Install CD to a new folder on your hard drive.
(b) You download all the files necessary to update that to the latest Win XP with SP3.
(c) Using more software tools, you update the image of the Install Disk in your folder to become a complete image of the new Install Disk you need.
(d) Using CD-R burning software you burn a new Install disk of your own.
(e) You use that new CD-R to re-do the Installation of Win XP, ensuring that this time it uses all of the HDD space for the C: drive.

This slipstreaming process is the longest route, but it is certainly the best. It means you will have a clean install of the latest Win XP and you will have your own Win XP Install Disk with SP3 included. It is a perfectly legal way to update the licensed XP Install disk you already own, and it is free. Go to the Microsoft site to start reading up on it. Most of the update files you will need come from there. Often, though, the software tools you need to do the copying, merging and final burning are from third parties.
a c 98 G Storage
August 2, 2010 10:54:14 PM

Your solution, Window 7!

Quote:
At the time of instalation (when you created the partition) your version of XP was pre-SP1.

If you search the forum, you'll find dozens of threads with advice on how to fix it.


Totally agree!

Windows XP, pre-SP1(?), does not support hard drives over 137GB.

Does your motherboard? Mobos, pre-2003, don't support 48-bit LBA, so again, 137GB Hard Drive limit. But I think you are ok, since your BIOS sees the drive, but the whole 2 TB?
August 3, 2010 8:08:54 AM

MrLinux said:
At the time of instalation (when you created the partition) your version of XP was pre-SP1.

If you search the forum, you'll find dozens of threads with advice on how to fix it.


I upgraded my version of XP to SP3. It is the only hard drive I have on my system and it has the OS loaded on it. In the past I had two hard drives and they seemed to load fine, being able to recognize more than 137GB. I don't understand why I can't do it again. The BIOS recognizes the full 2TB. I've read dozens of threads already but I'll do a search on it.
August 3, 2010 8:10:05 AM

I upgraded XP to SP3 and it is the only hard drive in the system at this time. I used to have two hard drives and I had no problem getting it to recognize more than 137GB. The BIOS recognizes the full 2TB.
August 3, 2010 8:12:20 AM

Thank you very much sir for your advice. I'll try it later when I have time.

Steven

Paperdoc said:
The answers depend a lot on information you did not give us. Is this the only HDD in your system? Did you install your OS on it? Or, is your OS already on another HDD and is this a new drive you are adding to an existing system?

First, let's assume as MrLinux did that this is your only HDD and you installed Win XP on it as the boot drive. (If that's not true - if you are adding a second HDD to a system - stop here and post a clarification for us to see.) If the OS you installed was original Win XP with NO service packs included in the Install Disk, it did NOT have support for 48-bit LBA and hence could not create or use any Partition over 137 GB (the way HDD makers count it) or 128 GB the way M$ counts it. Even if you update the installed XP to SP2 or SP3 after installation, that will NOT change the size of the Partition originally created. Jumpers have nothing to do with it. By the way, I strongly suggest you update to SP3, although that will NOT solve you problem here.

Once a Boot Partition is created, Win XP cannot expand it or change it in any way to add more disk space to it. So, how can you gain access to the rest of your 2 TB of space? You have five choices.

1. Leave what you have and adapt to the situation. Use Windows' built-in tool Disk Management to use the Unallocated Space on your HDD to Create one to three additional non-bootable Partitions on the drive and Format each of them. Each will be treated as a completely separate drive with its own letter name.

2. Buy and use a third-party software tool like Partition Magic that can (unlike Windows itself) expand your existing Partition by adding on the Unallocated Space so that your C: drive becomes as big as you want, up to the total HDD capacity.

From here on, the next three solution options mean you will wipe out what is on your HDD already and re-do the installation. So if you have been using your machine and it has important data in the HDD, make sure you copy it off to another safe place. Then AFTER the re-installation is done you can copy those back.

3. IF you are sure that the Win XP Install Disk you worked from DOES actually have SP1 or SP2 included in it, then just MAYBE the problem is that during the original Install process you did not notice that there was a choice to be made about the size of the Partition it was creating for the Installation. If that is the case, you can re-do the installation from the same disk, but be SURE to specify the Partition size as the entire HDD size. (By the way, Microsoft Windows will see a 2 TB HDD as about 1,825 GB, not 2,000.)

4. Assuming you only have an original Win XP Install Disk with NO Service Packs included, buy a different copy of Win XP that does have at least SP1 included in it and start over by re-installing from it. Ensure that the Partition it creates for the installation is the whole HDD space. Update to SP3 as soon as you can.

5. If you have a CD-R burner in your machine, you can make a new Win XP Install Disk by yourself for FREE with a process called Slipstreaming. Then you use it to re-do the Install, but this time with a fully up-to-date Win XP that WILL use the whole disk. To do this you will need to read up on the internet about Slipstreaming. Then you will have to download some software tools, some update files and a good step-by-step set of instructions. Basically, the steps in the process are these:
(a) Using a software tool, you copy your existing original Win XP Install CD to a new folder on your hard drive.
(b) You download all the files necessary to update that to the latest Win XP with SP3.
(c) Using more software tools, you update the image of the Install Disk in your folder to become a complete image of the new Install Disk you need.
(d) Using CD-R burning software you burn a new Install disk of your own.
(e) You use that new CD-R to re-do the Installation of Win XP, ensuring that this time it uses all of the HDD space for the C: drive.

This slipstreaming process is the longest route, but it is certainly the best. It means you will have a clean install of the latest Win XP and you will have your own Win XP Install Disk with SP3 included. It is a perfectly legal way to update the licensed XP Install disk you already own, and it is free. Go to the Microsoft site to start reading up on it. Most of the update files you will need come from there. Often, though, the software tools you need to do the copying, merging and final burning are from third parties.

August 10, 2010 12:57:43 AM

Best answer selected by WhiteLotus.
!